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Subject: What counts as a grand slam capture rss

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John
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I have played this once using the variant where a grand slam capture is allowed but doesn't capture anything (I don't think it made any difference in our game). I've just realised that I was assuming that a grand slam capture was capturing the seeds from all my opponent's pits (all 6) but having read a few threads on here it seems that a grand slam would be capturing all the seeds on my opponents side - so if one pit was empty and I captured the other 5 this would be a grand slam. Is this correct? If so is there a minimum size for a grand slam - does a single pit count as a grand slam?
 
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Damian Walker
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I hadn't come across the term "grand slam" in oware before, I've had to check it out on Wikipedia. Given that their definition is "capturing all of an opponent's seeds in one turn", that could include one pit if it had all the seeds in it.

That makes sense, as such a move would normally be illegal if there was no alternative. My sources put this as "leaving the opponent with a move" or other similar terms.
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John
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Thanks. Yes, it doesn't seem like a proper Oware term, but I've seen it used a few times to describe a moves which captures all seeds.
 
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John
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The term "grand slam capture" may have come from David Chamberlin's 1984 book "How to Play Warri" which is on line*. Interestingly in Chapter 1** he gives different rules from any others that I have read:

David Chamberlin wrote:
If one player empties the other's houses through a capture, he must move again to provide the other player with seeds, if that is possible. This situation usually arises in a "Grand Slam" capture, in which a player seeds his opponent's entire row twice.


This book is listed on http://www.oware.org/ (but is out of stock).

The Oware Society suggests that a move that captures all the opponents seeds does not capture anything.

oware.org wrote:
So long as there are no houses with less than two or more than three seeds, in-between them, a maximum of five houses can be captured in this way. Beyond five houses one forfeits everything, as this would leave the opponent with no seeds to play with.


Whilst this could be interpreted to mean that you could capture 5 houses this way if the opponent had no seeds in their 6th house I suspect the intention is that wouldn't be allowed (if it were ever to occur in a game which it might not between competent players).

* http://web.archive.org/web/20001012215151/http://scs.student.virginia.edu/~games/traditional/warri/rules.html
** http://web.archive.org/web/20001012114352/http://scs.student.virginia.edu/~games/traditional/warri/chapter1.html

(I can't work out how to make these links work)
 
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John
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I've just discovered Warri is a different game, the rule quoted above being the difference between that game and Oware. BGG lists Warri as an alternative name for Oware.
 
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