Jayson Myers
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Please check out my other reviews at:

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/145695/item/2728438#it...



Conclusion:

Wealth of Nations is a economic game that many will say is ugly or at least dull looking. The game is charts, numbers, and wooden bits. I have to start with that this is an "ugly" game. I get people will defend it, but the components are on the cheap side by today's standards. The game is tiles of colors with little dots.

This is a pure economic game that might take a while for people to wrap their head around, but the game is very simple. The game helps by giving you values for what trades should be worth. I HIGHLY recommend you stick to these numbers. It will drag the game out to try and get more. I wish they would have made this manadtory. This isn't a short game and trying to get another dollar is just death to this game.

This is a great teaching game about how economics work in a country. Supply and demand is in full effect and it is a great learning tool. The game is fascinating to watch unfold. This is going to be a turn off for some gamers. The game gives you interesting decisions in when to go into another industry but this is likely a mistake even though you feel like you must.

Wealth of Nations is going to lack that big moment you want in a game. Instead, your decisions harshly come back to haunt you over the course of the game. You can come back from a losing position in this game and that is exciting in its own right. This game isn't going to attract all gamers. This is a game for hardcore economic players, not because of the rule set, but rather because of the production of the game.

If you are playing against experienced gamers you will likely lose. When to automate and when to get into another industry and when to hose another player is so important, but it is an art in this game. While the game starts easy, after a copule of rounds you will see your decisions and the impact they have on the game. Your decisions will impact the other players also. There is some direct confrontation in this game.

Unless you fit the hardcore economic gamer group, I will tell you to try this game before you play it. It is unlikely you will appreciate this game without a couple of long plays.


Keeper.




Components:

The components are sub par. You get paper money, thin hexes, cylindar galore, a ton of wooden cubes (a little undersized), and a ton of little cheap cardboard counters. The board is just a bunch of hexes. The player boards/aid is just a tad on the cheap side. While everything in this game is functional, I would not call it a great production. It may be a statement from the time of its release, but it does not hold up by today's standards.




Rule Book:

Color/B/W: Color

Pictures of components: Yes

Picture of game set up: Yes

Pictures included: Yes

Example of playing the game: No

How long to read the book: 45 Minutes

Player Aid: Yes and it is really good after it is explained to you

The rules are pretty good. The back of the book has a great cheat sheet and the player aids included is very, very good. The set up is explained in detail. The first 8 pages is the set up and the components and the rules cover the next 6. The round is detailed in its explanation and is very good. The rule book itself is very good and you won't have any issues after reading it. Please pay attention to the tips and listen to them as it will help the play of the game come alive. Do not drag this game out. Listen to the tips!



Flow of the Game:

Goal of the Game:

The goal of the game is to have the most VP at the end of the game.

How it plays:

Players will play hexes to the board that represets their industry. They will produce goods and sell and trade those goods to get additional goods they need. Everything the players do should lead to scoring end of game VP or allow you to purchase things that will help you score even more VP.

Turn of the game:

1. Trade - Players take turns buying one single good (or sell). This is where you can trade with other players. On your turn, they can only trade with you.

2. Develop - 5 possible actions

A. Place a flag - this basically claims an area on the map for you to develop latter
B. Build industry tile - these have different cost, for the most part, the more of a type of industry you have the more productive those tiles are
C. Move industry tiles - at some point, you may be cornered and the need to move tiles will arise
D. Automate - Industry tiles cost resources to use each round; by automation you can reduce your cost for food
E. Pass and do nothing

*It is important to note that all of these actions cost resource cubes and they are very difficult to get. Spending these resources is the difference between winning and losing. This can be a harsh game, so you can fall behind at times.

3. Produce - You give up resource cubes to produce with your industry (usually this cost food and/or ore).

----------------------------------------------

** The first phase is the longest. The second phase shorter and the third is not long at all.





Should I buy this game?:

This is really for hard core fans of economic games only. The game can be a little long and you must specalize or the game can drag. Yet, this is the purest economic game on the market and one of the driest. I like this game and it will stay in my collection. If you like economic games, play this game.

Keeper.


*The images posted with this review are not mine and are images I found on BGG. If you click on the image, you can see who posted it to BGG.
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Agent J
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So dry, so ugly, so so good.
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I H
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Wealth of Nations is certainly functions well from an edutainment point of view, but with the convention of set trade pricing, the optimization engine becomes the focus of the game. That engine simply fails to hold my interest across multiple plays. (Even if the trade pricing was not explicitly printed on the board, the groups I play with, buyer and seller would quickly learn to [roughly] split the savings/profit anyway, which is the bane of other games -- e.g., Chinatown -- as well.)

Imperial, of similar weight and length, makes for a much more engaging economic game that remains exciting with each and every play.
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Agent J
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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He's a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal of action. He's a furry little flat-foot who'll never flinch from a fray. He's got more than just mad skills, he's got a beaver tail and a bill.
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Trade pricing isn't the negotiation.

Trade partner is.

IE, you're looking at the negotiations the wrong way - trying to make a dollar here, instead of shutting the right people out of the trading market and into the board markets, which have horrible discounts on the selling and buying prices.

In Chinatown or Genoa, a deal either gets done or it doesn't. In Wealth of Nations, the deals get done, but it's either done at a huge cost savings through trade or it's done via the market at a much higher cost. That's what makes trading important - not having the ability to widdle the price down a nickel.
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Jayson Myers
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Jythier wrote:
So dry, so ugly, so so good.


And so true...
 
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Dylan Nichols
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I wanted so much to like this game.

But it was just DENSE. It felt like playing an excel spreadsheet.

Imperial sounds interesting though...
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Agent J
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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Imperial is interesting, but you're not going to find a game with a truer economy than WoN. And you can't trade in Imperial. Or at least, I haven't tried to yet. I suppose the way you run countries can be the trade.
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David Gibbs
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william4192 wrote:

Yet, this is the purest economic game on the market and one of the driest.


I might argue that Container is the purest economic game on the market.

Still, this is definitely one of the purest.

Jythier wrote:
... but you're not going to find a game with a truer economy than WoN.


Again, I might argue that Container provides a truer economy.

But, Container and Wealth of Nations are two of the pure-economy games out there.
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Agent J
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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He's a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal of action. He's a furry little flat-foot who'll never flinch from a fray. He's got more than just mad skills, he's got a beaver tail and a bill.
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Container is more of a closed economy while WoN is an open economy, with the others represented by the market boards. I'd say they both do exactly what they're meant to do and I'm very glad to own both.
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Agent J
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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He's a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal of action. He's a furry little flat-foot who'll never flinch from a fray. He's got more than just mad skills, he's got a beaver tail and a bill.
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Also I can teach a game of Container in 1/5 of the time it takes to teach WoN and have all the players actually understand it in that time.
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David Gibbs
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Jythier wrote:
Container is more of a closed economy while WoN is an open economy, with the others represented by the market boards. I'd say they both do exactly what they're meant to do and I'm very glad to own both. :D


I'm glad to own both, too. Along with 1830: Railways & Robber Barons, they're my, "so you want to play an economic game?" set.
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Agent J
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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He's a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal of action. He's a furry little flat-foot who'll never flinch from a fray. He's got more than just mad skills, he's got a beaver tail and a bill.
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I never have that many hours for 1830.

Captains of Industry is very much in the middle of the two, with outside and inside buyers. That's my next go-to game.

Planet Steam's market is very interesting and works just as well as Wealth of Nations.

Locomotive Werks is purely buying and selling, same feel as the train rush in 1830 (so I hear) but without the length of the game or the stock market.

Rolling Stock is 1830 the card game, AND you can find games of that here to play by forum - we have a really nice spreadsheet that does 90% of the work for us.

Container and WoN are almost always talked about, but I'm a bit stuck on production/buying and selling/trading type games, so I know quite a lot of them.
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Moe45673
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It should be stated that WoN is much improved when using the V2 rules. I love this game and regrettably had to sell it as it took way too long to play. I never even finished a game!
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Big Head Zach
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I am curious to see how WoN compares to the upcoming M.U.L.E. board game conversion.
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Agent J
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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He's a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal of action. He's a furry little flat-foot who'll never flinch from a fray. He's got more than just mad skills, he's got a beaver tail and a bill.
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Planet Steam was a lot closer to MULE in my opinion.
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Moe45673
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The downside of Planet Steam is the lack of any transactions occurring between players, which MULE reportedly has. This does keep the playtime down, though.
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Agent J
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
badge
He's a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal of action. He's a furry little flat-foot who'll never flinch from a fray. He's got more than just mad skills, he's got a beaver tail and a bill.
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iirc, MULE had a realtime market that involved people selling and people buying, including a market, and you had a price level that you would lower or raise, and if you hit another player there would be transactions, or if you hit the market you'd sell to it or buy from it.
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