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Wings of War: Famous Aces» Forums » General

Subject: Getting started rss

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Glen Rudis
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How would one go about getting started with this game? I have been messing around with X-Wing miniatures and I have heard this is very similar, but with a different theme.

So how is it alike and different from X-Wing?

What would be a good place to start as far as what to buy, maybe provide some Amazon links for some good sets?
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Man thinks, the river flows.
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    First off, Wings of War is now Wings of Glory. Same exact game, different publisher, plusher components. This Famous Aces package is out of print, hard to find, and not necessary for playing the new version.

    Instead, start off with Wings of Glory: WW1 Duel Pack. This is the starter kit for Wings of Glory and has all you need for one-on-one combat. Getting both Duel Packs if you like the first isn't a half bad idea, since you get double damage decks and four good planes to start. The next logical option would be Wings of Glory: WW1 Airplane Packs to get more planes on the board (and the game is much more interesting with four than with two) or the Wings of Glory: WW1 Rules and Accessories Pack.

    Star Wars X-Wing is primarily a game about shooting. Wings of Glory is primarily a game about maneuvering. There's just a few options in the advanced rules for "builds" and the real action comes in the three-down-three-up card play, that makes out-maneuvering your opponent the big challenge in the game. X-Wing sometimes plays three moves (turns) in an hour, Wings of Glory will play dozens of moves in an hour. It's much more about positioning.

    I personally prefer the historic aspect to it -- all the planes are vintage paint jobs and actual warplane designs. I also like that I don't have to prep ahead of time, showing up with my planes, plunking down at the table and just going. It's a much more social game that way. And, if you can find players, you can put two-dozen airplanes on the table in one great big furball without the game grinding to a halt. The majority of the action happens simultaneously, so you're up on your feet and doing almost the entire time.

    A personal favorite.

              S.

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Andrea Angiolino
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rudis21 wrote:
So how is it alike and different from X-Wing?


The answer also differs depending if you consider WW1 or WW2 Wings of War/Glory.

The structure of the turn is basically the same in Wings of War/Glory (let me call it "Wings" in short, plese) as in X-Wing: Everybody plans, everybody move, everybody fire, a few checks and start again.

Moves in X-Wing are the same allowed to WW2 Wings fighters: straight, 45°, 90° of different lenghts (WW1 has 60° as a standard instead and a single speed for each plane). In X-Wing, as in Wings, there is even an Immelmann turn, a typical maneuvre from 20th century dogfights, even if not really fitting in a Star Wars setting.

Planning is 1 move per turn, as in WW2 Wings at introductory level (in WW1 you plan 3 moves per turn, in standard WW2 you plan one move per turn but one turn ahead).

In Wings you move and fire all at the same time, in X-Wing there is an initiative to consider to get the order of movement and firing (hence IMHO the introduction of downtime in X-Wing and the fact that X-Wing does not scale well increasing players and ships).

Firing cone is slightly broader in X-Wing - it is identically defined from center of base to front corners, but bases in X-Wing are more squared.

Firing ranges are almost the same lenght, with an inchless ruler. But there are three ranges in X-Wing instead than the 2 in Wings.
Besides, in Wings you check firing from the center of the base instead than from the edge. This solves some paradoxes that X-Wing has with lines of sight.

To fire, in Wings you do not roll dice, you just draw cards (in WW1) or chits (in WW2). Damage is secret. A plane can sustain 10/16 damage points instead than just 2 or 3, so firing is far less hit-or-miss. Added to secrecy, this makes situations far less frustrating IMHO than in X-Wing. If you do the perfect maneuvre in Wings, you have the satisfaction of delivering two cards of damage to the opponent - they are almost never two 0s, and even if they are you do not know it. In X-Wing, you often see all your guessing and planning ability (already lessened by the "choose a single move - use it immediately" sequence that often makes very obvious where you have to go) erased by a bad result on dice.

Hence the very good synthesis by Sagrilarus about the different emphasis of the two games on movement and combat, even in their many similarities in look and mechanics.

Besides, Wings tries to be faithful to the setting. In the game, airplanes reflects the real characteristics of the historical ones they represent. There is not the casual approach to simulation of X-Wing, with a Millennium Falcon that's quicker than Imperial fighters, red TIEs (missing von Richthofen maybe? ) and Imperial corvettes invented from scratch for the game.


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