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Subject: Short Review with some thoughts about why I don't like Dark Moon rss

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Ian Allen
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Let me start out by saying that Battlestar Galactica is my favorite game all time and i've played it over 70 times now. I love it so much I created a set of the game and all the expansions out of Legos. I would gladly play this every friday night all year long.

Having said that, I will go on to add that one or two members of my current game group have grown weary of BSG and I never get to play it anymore, which makes me sad.

That is why I was hoping I could get enough of the BSG experience in BSG Express or the upgraded Dark Moon to convince the group to play the shorter game.

At this point I've played BSG Express 2 or 3 times and Dark Moon once.

I am not going to go into detail on the mechanics of the game, after reading Rahdo's SUPER DETAILED awesome review, anything I could say or pictures I could show would just be redundant.

But I do have some thoughts on the differences between the long and the short version of BSG and I'd like to share those and see what other people think.

So lets get to it.
While they did change several things with Dark Moon and make it a much better game than BSG Express, my opinion is that it is about 1/5th the fun of BSG in 1/2 the time.

I do think you could get the play time down to an hour and BSG takes an average now of about 3 to 3.5 hours with 5 players ( add about an hour to that if playing with 6 or 7)
If you could get Dark Moon's playing time down to 1/3rd the time .... would it be worth playing?
Not to me.

Here is why:

In BSG, with all the expansions, I feel like I have about a dozen to maybe 20 choices each round.
Granted there are good and bad parts of each expansion and I could go into detail on that, but I will summarize it to say:

Expansions and Options to Include:

+Base Set
+Pegasus Expansion +Pegasus -New Caprica
+Exodus Expansion +Cylon Fleet Board -Ionian Nebula -Conflicted Loyalties
+Daybreak Expansion -Search for Home -Demetrius

Of the 12 to 20 choices I mentioned above, there are usually 1 or 2 choices that are considered "best options", and then 2 or 3 other choices that
"make sense" and are acceptable, and then 3 or 4 choices that make someone wonder whether you are just wasting your turn or whether you have something sneaky in mind one way or the other, and then 3 or 4 choices that make people openly accuse you of being a Cylon.

These choices are all sort of on a sliding scale of importance based on how critical the situation is at the moment.
If its turn 1, then just about anything is acceptable. If the game is hanging in the balance, then anything but "best options" will
get groans and accusations and table talk flying, so you range of acceptable choices starts out VERY broad and slowly gets narrower and narrower towards the end of the game.

Even still, you still have to make interesting and sometimes agonizing decisions all the way to the end of the game.... do I Exec Order another player, do I try to shoot down some of the enemy ships, do I repair FTL because we may need it soon, do I use my OPG (once per game) ability, do I draw cards to get ready for upcoming crisis checks, do I launch into space, do I play a quorum card, do we try to brig someone, do we strip the presidency from someone, do I make a check Reckless in order to gain some bonus, not to mention all the revealed Cylon options (which there are a lot more of with the expansions), etc. etc. etc.

That depth of choice is what I love about BSG. I don't get that many options in any other game I can think of. There is a fair amount of table talk, like with any cooperative game, but you can follow the "group-think" or you can do your own thing as you see fit.

With Dark Moon there are only 2 or 3 total choices each round total. It was basically Repair spot A, B, or C OR get a couple of your dice back. OR you could exec order someone else to .... either Repair A, B, or C or else get a couple of dice back. Hardly any decisions at all and definitely not interesting ones.

PLUS - Instead of card play being the main mechanic, this has become a dice game, so there is a lot more of a luck factor in what you do on your turn. I am a terrible dice roller and needed another dice rolling game like a hole in the head.

Taking Dune or Cosmic Encounter and turning it into a dice game would make me want to drive my car into a pylon and end it all.
During our session, we had a Human we had a player who only contributed negative dice many times even though he didn't want to.
As a Cylon, I had to contribute a couple of positive dice in a row even though I didn't want to. I don't like being forced to help the other side against my will.

In BSG you take the action or play the card you want to play and only incidental things like extra casualties on FTL early jumps
or how much you kill when shooting a nuke, etc. are covered by a die roll. The equivalent in BSG to playing dice you don't want to in Dark Moon would be if you were forced to contribute cards to a skill check even though you only had cards that would help the other side. That would be awful in BSG and I am likewise not a fan of it in Dark Moon.

Now if in Dark Moon you could roll first and then on your turn decide whether you wanted to contribute dice or not, based on what you rolled, I would like it better.
But - that's not how the mechanic works. The way it currently works, with you saying "IN" or "OUT", then rolling secretly behind your screen and being forced to contribute at least 1 die whether it helps you or hurts you, provides cover to the Cylon player because you can shrug your shoulders and say "I had to put out a negative - its all I rolled". That is the ONLY cover you are going to get in that game and it only works so many times before people start accusing you.

I feel like BSG is deep like the Mississippi River and that Dark Moon is like a big puddle of rain in the parking lot.
Sure, both of those games will get you wet, but if you are intent on catching fish - good luck with the puddle.

I completely understand that the big draw of Dark Moon is the playing time. Playing the game in 1 hour is hugely attractive to some folks. I get it.
I am of the school that would rather play an AWESOME 4 hour game of Descent 1 than a goofy, puzzle-like 1 hour session of Descent 2.

Obviously if 5 player Dark Moon took 3 hours to play like 5 player BSG, then people would NEVER play Dark Moon over BSG.

So the question is - is it still worth playing after hacking away all the depth and turning it into a dice game?

In my opinion no.
You don't have much time to do anything sneaky as a Cylon - the game, with you not openly working against the humans, moves forward VERY fast.
If you don't reveal at some point the game is going to be over, so to me it felt like the "Hidden Cylon" part of BSG was accelerated so much that you might as well just reveal in the beginning and start doing something useful for your team.
If you stay hidden, you can help the Human side, because of the "Must play a die if In" mechanic as much as hurt them.
Without the depth of BSG, there is less room to do fun, clever, sneaky things and its more about bashing your enemies over the head with a chair.

Now if you just want an hour long dice game, there are plenty of others out there that are plenty of fun.
I think what Dark Moon is trying to offer over those other dice games, is the traitor mechanic, which I was not hugely impressed with.

If I had never played BSG, I might think this game was amusing and alternate it in the rotation with King of Tokyo, Las Vegas, Liar's Dice, Elder Sign, Pickomino, and so forth, but because I am such a BSG fan, all I see when I play it are the ways in which it is inferior and I stare blankly at the lack of interesting choices and curse the crappy die rolls.

Anyway - those are my thoughts on it, biased from an "I-love-BSG" perspective.
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trevor

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Thank for the review, however I'm not so sure you can really compare BSG and Dark Moon, they are very different games IMHO, other than the hidden traitor mechanism.

Dark moon isn't trying to replace BSG, to me it's a separate style of game. BSG is an epic, sweeping game of negotiation and cooperation, with suspicion and double crossing on a grand scale. This is more of a small scale, reach objectives and sniff out a traitor in a short time frame to accomplish a set of small, focused goals.
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David Hammel
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Not to invalidate anything you said, but your first line told me everything I needed to know. I don't think the hardcore BSGers will ever think another game comes close to The Precious.
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Cameron McKenzie
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People look for different things in a game.

Personally I find it annoying when a game offers you dozens of possibilities in a turn where many of them are actually quite similar and many of them are too situational to be useful. It just creates a learning cure without adding much depth of strategy.

The tough choices in Dark Moon are usually not in how to spend your action (it is probably the least important choice you can make) but rather in which task card to pick, figuring out who you can trust, and which malfunctions to play in or pass on.

The game basically takes a few core concepts from BSG. The malfunctions are similar to skill checks, but with a different mechanic for dice. The mechanics around quarantine (brig), damage tokens, commander title, revealing as infected, and issuing orders, are all very similar to BSG. What we don't have are quorum cards, piloting mechanics, character variety, skill card actions.

In my opinion, Dark Moon takes the best part of BSG and leaves the bloat out. That middle hour of BSG (when people are at each other's throat with suspicion) is always the best part to me and Dark Moon feels that way the entire time.

But if you are into the skill cards, quorum cards, and space battles, there is no equivalent in dark moon. In that case, I can really understand the disappointment. To each his own
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Paul Newsham
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BSG: the game so good that none of your friends will play it.
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Eric Matthews
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bigGameGeek wrote:
Thank for the review, however I'm not so sure you can really compare BSG and Dark Moon, they are very different games IMHO, other than the hidden traitor mechanism.

Dark moon isn't trying to replace BSG, to me it's a separate style of game. BSG is an epic, sweeping game of negotiation and cooperation, with suspicion and double crossing on a grand scale. This is more of a small scale, reach objectives and sniff out a traitor in a short time frame to accomplish a set of small, focused goals.


Whether one agrees with the review or not, Dark Moon was literally designed specifically as "BSG express". Of course there are differences,but to say these two games can't be compared doesn't even make sense.

Are there any reviews of Dark Moon out there that don't compare it to BSG in some way?


E
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Zaid
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That's the deal. Even though it is BSG Express, it rips out a big part of what some people love about BSG, which in turn makes them dislike Dark Moon. Also the part it removes is a part many dislike so Dark Moon becomes appealing to them, it's a streamlined version without all the bells and whistles that some people love, but very few people have patience for.

And that's where BSG Express and Dark Moon come in. Yeah, they're fair to compare, but BSG Express/Dark Moon scraps a lot of what BSG is, which makes BSG lovers hate it.
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Richard
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TheGreatHamEl wrote:
Not to invalidate anything you said, but your first line told me everything I needed to know. I don't think the hardcore BSGers will ever think another game comes close to The Precious.

That's great wording to invalidate a person's opinions based upon their opinions.
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Charlie Theel
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Oh Ian. You back up your opinion with good points and are certainly very detailed. I think it's good to have this review up under Dark Moon to highlight this perspective, which I'm sure other BSG fans may have.

I agree the mechanical depth is not there in this design (purposely due to time constraints), but it did more than enough for me by replacing those gutted options with the in your face dice mechanic. It brings discussion and suspicion to the fore much quicker and I think it does so as well as you possibly can.

I know you didn't like your first play of Homeland and I don't think you should waste your time playing that again either, as it occupies the same niche Dark Moon does - one which I don't think needs filling in your collection.

I'm very happy with Dark Moon though, and it has been a huge hit with the people I've brought it out with.

Besides time - one thing worth mentioning that it really excels at compared to BSG is player count. I've found Dark Moon to work with virtually any number of players.
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Mike Oehler
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MasterDinadan wrote:
People look for different things in a game.

Personally I find it annoying when a game offers you dozens of possibilities in a turn where many of them are actually quite similar and many of them are too situational to be useful. It just creates a learning cure without adding much depth of strategy.

The tough choices in Dark Moon are usually not in how to spend your action (it is probably the least important choice you can make) but rather in which task card to pick, figuring out who you can trust, and which malfunctions to play in or pass on.

The game basically takes a few core concepts from BSG. The malfunctions are similar to skill checks, but with a different mechanic for dice. The mechanics around quarantine (brig), damage tokens, commander title, revealing as infected, and issuing orders, are all very similar to BSG. What we don't have are quorum cards, piloting mechanics, character variety, skill card actions.

In my opinion, Dark Moon takes the best part of BSG and leaves the bloat out. That middle hour of BSG (when people are at each other's throat with suspicion) is always the best part to me and Dark Moon feels that way the entire time.

But if you are into the skill cards, quorum cards, and space battles, there is no equivalent in dark moon. In that case, I can really understand the disappointment. To each his own :)


I'd generally agree that BSG probably has more fiddly bits than it really needs.

But while Dark Moon cuts some kind of peripheral game mechanics to speed things up, I also feel it messes up skill checks.

BSG, with different types of cards adding/subtracting to different checks, and known draws, can provide a lot more actual evidence for sabotage. In some cases, most obviously with piloting, you can logically prove that someone lied about their contribution. Or you can estimate potential harm based on their colors and the check.

And in Dark Moon, you can't. It's all about whether or not you believe someone when they say they can only put in a negative die.

Essentially, BSG has a mix of resource management, social deduction, and evidence based deduction. Dark Moon doesn't just cut out classic FFG bloat (:)), it also cuts out most of that last part with more randomized outcomes, and more importance on guessing to limit infected quickly in the shorter time frame of the game.
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Cameron McKenzie
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Dark Moon has you asking questions like "How likely is it that an innocent player would have submitted that many negatives?" That part is just math, but it goes further than math because you also consider WHICH checks the player put negatives in, what kind of task cards he has chosen, and what kind of decisions he as made otherwise. Even decisions as simple as in/out can be telling (for example, choosing IN when three other people already chose in is a little questionable)

You could even read into positive rolls some. If a player threw +1 or +2 every time they rolled, you might start to wonder if they are intentionally holding back 3s and 4s.

Furthermore, you have to ask yourself whether it is worse to wrongly imprison an innocent or to let an infected go free. And if the suspected is the commander, that can really affect your risk tolerance.

It a different sort of social deduction, but no less valid.

It is very different than BSG skill checks (where you try to track where each card came from) but much like Roslin crisis or desintation picks (you see the result but didn't know what their choices were). I've always enjoyed the latter in BSG but it doesn't do it very often.

I can understand why it doesn't appeal to all. It's more mathy and statistical inference (drawing uncertain conclusions from certain data) rather than straight up deduction (which draws certain conclusions).

I'm a statistics guy, so I love it
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Ian Allen
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I think the biggest part for me is the fact that you are forced to put in dice that work for the other team.
That just irritates me. That is not letting you make a choice - it is forcing you to do something against your will at gunpoint.

If you rolled really really badly, you could help the other side over and over and over against your will. It is frustrating to lose a game like this over the luck of the dice and not the skill of the player.

The reasoning behind the mechanic I don't like - you can't SECRETLY contribute to a check when you are using dice like you can with cards in BSG.

So being forced to put a die in even if it helps the other team is the way the designer came up with to get around not being able to put a card in face down and hide who put in what.

Dice are not a good fit for a traitor mechanic like cards are. That is the problem.

There is no good solution using dice that I can think of off the top of my head to mask a traitor.

My solution would be to take this very same game and lose the dice and give people random card draws with the same distribution on them.

Then you could either play or not play cards into the check if you are "IN" however you like and the pile could be shuffled up to provide cover.
If you are "OUT" you draw more cards.
I think I might like the express version that way.

to sum up:
I think the problem with BSG Express aka Dark Moon is that it uses dice instead of cards and therefore has to do a clunky workaround that takes the decision out of the players hands, to try to mash the square peg into the round hole.

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Jonathan Kinney
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It's funny, I don't view Dark Moon as a watered down BSG replacement. I see it as an "upgraded" gameplay experience for those people playing Werewolf, Resistance or other super-quick hidden traitor games.

As well, it is not really a dice game. Yes, you roll dice. And yes, the dice impact the outcomes of the game. BUT, it is more about the decisions of the individuals in the game.

I can roll two positives and a negative. If this were simply a dice game, then I'd submit all my dice and it would go from there. But because the rolls are hidden and because the active player CHOOSES what to do, this game moves well beyond a dice game. It could just as easily be dealt cards or tiles.

I think that associating it with BSG Express, may have been a mistake. I think it would have made more sense to either let the current theme stand on its own OR look for another IP...I know people have talked about The Thing and that would be perfect...in fact we often make "The Thing" quotes as we're playing.

I guess what I'm saying is that, to me, this game is about the people sitting around the table and how they interact with each other and the game...more than simply rolling dice.

As an aside, I with I could say that I had played BSG 1/10th as many times as you. I've played it once, enjoyed it immensely, but have not been able to find the people to play it again.
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Jonathan Kinney
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glookose wrote:
I think the biggest part for me is the fact that you are forced to put in dice that work for the other team.
That just irritates me. That is not letting you make a choice - it is forcing you to do something against your will at gunpoint.

If you rolled really really badly, you could help the other side over and over and over against your will. It is frustrating to lose a game like this over the luck of the dice and not the skill of the player.

The reasoning behind the mechanic I don't like - you can't SECRETLY contribute to a check when you are using dice like you can with cards in BSG.

So being forced to put a die in even if it helps the other team is the way the designer came up with to get around not being able to put a card in face down and hide who put in what.

Dice are not a good fit for a traitor mechanic like cards are. That is the problem.

There is no good solution using dice that I can think of off the top of my head to mask a traitor.

My solution would be to take this very same game and lose the dice and give people random card draws with the same distribution on them.

Then you could either play or not play cards into the check if you are "IN" however you like and the pile could be shuffled up to provide cover.
If you are "OUT" you draw more cards.
I think I might like the express version that way.

to sum up:
I think the problem with BSG Express aka Dark Moon is that it uses dice instead of cards and therefore has to do a clunky workaround that takes the decision out of the players hands, to try to mash the square peg into the round hole.



I think the reason for the open failure, thematically, is that under the stress of the uncertain infections, and the base collapsing, stress means that people are crumbling under the pressure. Even experts cannot complete their tasks (however, they do receive the benefit of retrieving one of their tools - e.g, shield tech taking a die back when attempting to repair shields).

Personally, I think the open dice failures add to the tension in the game. It makes it a little more of a roleplaying game.
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Jim Jones
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glookose wrote:


The reasoning behind the mechanic I don't like - you can't SECRETLY contribute to a check when you are using dice like you can with cards in BSG.

So being forced to put a die in even if it helps the other team is the way the designer came up with to get around not being able to put a card in face down and hide who put in what.

Dice are not a good fit for a traitor mechanic like cards are. That is the problem.



You see, I LOVE this. It's what generates the paranoia and feels MORE realistic to me. In life, it is hard sometimes to distinguish between action and intent and the dice mechanic for this simulated high stress environment plays that out perfectly.
 
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Ian Allen
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morlockhq wrote:
glookose wrote:


The reasoning behind the mechanic I don't like - you can't SECRETLY contribute to a check when you are using dice like you can with cards in BSG.

So being forced to put a die in even if it helps the other team is the way the designer came up with to get around not being able to put a card in face down and hide who put in what.

Dice are not a good fit for a traitor mechanic like cards are. That is the problem.



You see, I LOVE this. It's what generates the paranoia and feels MORE realistic to me. In life, it is hard sometimes to distinguish between action and intent and the dice mechanic for this simulated high stress environment plays that out perfectly.


I understand what you are saying, but when you get a really bad run on the dice it can feel like the decision making process is taken out of your hands.

I have no choice but to help the other side. Next round, another crappy roll, I have no choice but to help the other side, another crappy roll - I have no choice but to help the other side.

To me - one of the most exciting and interesting things about playing board games are the choices you get to make. When those choices are taken out of your hands, you are just at the mercy of the dice.

In BSG you choose whether to play good cards, bad cards, whatever you want to do. In this game you frequently don't get to make that decision.

To me this game is only interesting when I roll a certain way and get to make a CHOICE about what I put in.

What fun is it to be a traitor and be forced to put in positive dice 3 rounds in a row like I did when I played it last? How does that reward clever, sneaky, skilled, strategic play?

I think this game ALMOST achieved what it set out to do, and is only held back by the fact that there is an awkward dice mechanic in a game with hidden traitors.

The game may still be fun to play, given the short play time, but it will be hard to convince me that dice work better than cards in a game like this. I think when the upgrade got made from BSG Express to Dark Star, they could have dropped the dice and made use of a less awkward and forced mechanic for dealing with hidden traitors.
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Allan Clements
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I agree that the dice mechanic doesn't really spread suspicion like the BSG card mechanic.

With the dice it just puts suspicion on the player who put the negative dice in.

With BSG when we see negative cards, we start to wonder which one of us did it, or was it destiny?

I do like the choice of tasks (BSG would be more fun if everyone had Roslins power) but to me they are too similar to be much of an interesting choice.



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Ian Allen
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Kamakaze wrote:
I agree that the dice mechanic doesn't really spread suspicion like the BSG card mechanic.

With the dice it just puts suspicion on the player who put the negative dice in.

With BSG when we see negative cards, we start to wonder which one of us did it, or was it destiny?

I do like the choice of tasks (BSG would be more fun if everyone had Roslins power) but to me they are too similar to be much of an interesting choice.





Good point - those 3 tasks are either repair spot 1, repair spot 2, or repair spot 3 .... not super interesting - even for a LITE game.

And most of the penalties - for revealing, being quarantined, being fatigued, etc. - are just "have less dice" ... which gives you even less choices to make.

The one thing I do like about Dark Moon, other than the theme, is the half of the event deck where you get choices. Those choices were the most interesting in the game. Do I give up one of my die slots to another player or do I keep my die slot and we don't move forward on the track?, etc.
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Stephen Rider
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MasterDinadan wrote:
But if you are into the skill cards, quorum cards, and space battles, there is no equivalent in dark moon. In that case, I can really understand the disappointment. To each his own


That'll be the expansion. Duh. ;-)
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This is a great review. First of all you explain your bias for BSG. It's honest and very informative as I know BSG and I am not a fan for various reasons.
Just by reading the title and the first line I already get a ton of information.
Even though I won't probably share your opinion about this game, I thank you for the help on my research about this game: well done.
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As a fellow diehard fan of the BSG board game and the brilliant tension and drama it usually provides in my play groups, this review was EXTREMELY helpful for me. I'm sure there are many more like me coming to check out what became of that "BSG Express" project. The reviewer should be praised, not criticized, for reviewing Dark Moon from that perspective.

I was concerned that Dark Moon replaces strategic decisions based on trust and use of limited resources with random dice rolls. Statistical inference is less fun than social/strategic inference. Maybe there will be a Dark Moon expansion that adds more mechanics that tap into the feelings of "I'd better save some resources to protect myself rather than help the group this time" and "I don't trust you, but I have to work with you right now to get over this crisis."

Still, I will probably give Dark Moon a shot because I hunger for semi-cooperative traitor games.
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Paul Newsham
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thisisnotatest wrote:
I was concerned that Dark Moon replaces strategic decisions based on trust and use of limited resources with random dice rolls. Statistical inference is less fun than social/strategic inference. Maybe there will be a Dark Moon expansion that adds more mechanics that tap into the feelings of "I'd better save some resources to protect myself rather than help the group this time" and "I don't trust you, but I have to work with you right now to get over this crisis."


Dice pool management is a huge part of Dark Moon, both for dealing with Tasks (equivalent to Crises) and for retaining the option to vote either way when a quarantine vote comes up.

Some of the tasks fit your second requirement exactly; you succeed based on various acts of trust (showing status card, transferring leadership, permanent transfer of a die).
 
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David Chang

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jonocop wrote:
It's funny, I don't view Dark Moon as a watered down BSG replacement. I see it as an "upgraded" gameplay experience for those people playing Werewolf, Resistance or other super-quick hidden traitor games.

As well, it is not really a dice game. Yes, you roll dice. And yes, the dice impact the outcomes of the game. BUT, it is more about the decisions of the individuals in the game.

I can roll two positives and a negative. If this were simply a dice game, then I'd submit all my dice and it would go from there. But because the rolls are hidden and because the active player CHOOSES what to do, this game moves well beyond a dice game. It could just as easily be dealt cards or tiles.

I think that associating it with BSG Express, may have been a mistake. I think it would have made more sense to either let the current theme stand on its own OR look for another IP...I know people have talked about The Thing and that would be perfect...in fact we often make "The Thing" quotes as we're playing.

I guess what I'm saying is that, to me, this game is about the people sitting around the table and how they interact with each other and the game...more than simply rolling dice.

As an aside, I with I could say that I had played BSG 1/10th as many times as you. I've played it once, enjoyed it immensely, but have not been able to find the people to play it again.


I've never played Dark Moon. And my crowd of board game players LOVE playing social deduction games (Werewolf, ONUW, Secret Hitler, Avalon, Good Cop Bad Cop, etc). We play other games like 7 Wonders and the like as well for a nice change of pace.

But I always wanted to get a game where it can add a bit more meat to the social deduction genre. Do you think this is something that would be perfect for our group?
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Simon Maynard
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Exeter
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Changsta wrote:
I've never played Dark Moon. And my crowd of board game players LOVE playing social deduction games (Werewolf, ONUW, Secret Hitler, Avalon, Good Cop Bad Cop, etc). We play other games like 7 Wonders and the like as well for a nice change of pace.

But I always wanted to get a game where it can add a bit more meat to the social deduction genre. Do you think this is something that would be perfect for our group?

Indeed, this is precisely where I'm coming from. I want to bring a social deduction game to the table that has a bit more meat on it (and we're never going to have time to play BSG).
 
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Ian Allen
United States
Madison
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By all means give it a try as a medium-long length hidden traitor game.

Report back here if it works for you as a next step up from Social Deduction.

It's more than just a notch up from Werewolf and Resistance though. The time/complexity level is a big jump.

I find the dice forcing you to help the other side annoying, because it takes the decision away from you in those cases, but overall the game is not terrible if you can't get BSG to the table.


You might take a look at Samurai Sword (very nice Bang retheme), Castle of the Devil, Shadowhunters, Room 25, Spyfall, Blood Bound, Deception: Murder in Hong Kong and/or Shadows Over Camelot (not the card game version of SoC though - I hated that)
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