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Subject: Fun for Kids and Adults! rss

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d clunie
United States
san jose
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Number of Players 2-6

Time: 30+ min (won't exceed 45)

Style: Shake n Match (similar to Yachtzee)

What's in the box:

6 Dice with a Dot, Face, Slash, Dash, Squiggle, Curve. Very Nicely made, in that they aren't just silk screened on or stickers, they are made as dice with the shapes IN the plastic itself. Very Durable.

60 Cards (10 Cards in Each of the 6 Colors; Orange, Red, Yellow, Green, Blue, Purple. If your colorblind the game can still be played as the colors correspond to the complexity of the pictures 1=orange, 6=purple, see below)

4 "Special Cards" (2 Free Roll, 2 Block Roll)

Shaker Cup

Rules Sheet.

Gameplay:

Gameplay consists of putting out 6 cards on the table face up for the "gallery", one in each color at the start of the game. The first player then draws and places another card "in the gallery". The player then rolls their dice.

The goal is to collect one card of each color. How you collect those cards is by creating the pictures on the card with the dice you've just rolled. If you can create any of the pictures on any of the 7 cards in the gallery you can choose only one card as your prize. You can only have one color of card in your "collection" at any time. If you only can partially make a picture one of the cards in the galley select the "extra" dice and re-roll them again up to 3 times total (including your first roll) At this point you either have to have made a picture and claimed a card or your turn is over.

The cards themselves range in complexity for their pictures:

Orange is made up of one die

Red is made up of two dice

Yellow is made up of three dice

Green is made up of four dice

Blue is made up of five dice

Purple is made up of all six dice

(so you can see color blind people can play this game with out much effort too!)

There are Three extra rules for complexity in the game, one is that at any time before a roll is made you can choose to "steal" one of the other players cards, as long as you don't have that color of course. How this is done is you declare your action to steal a card before you roll. Then you have to roll the dice and try to create that picture on that card you are trying to steal. If you fail to do so the player retains ownership, if you succeed then you win the card and put it into your collection. This allows you to "steal" colors that you might need if those colors aren't showing in the gallery, the only drawback is that you have to roll for that card, so if there are more "options" in the gallery for a card you need you'll be better off rolling for those instead. Stealing is primarily used for "blocking" someone from winning.

The other two things are the cards that allow you to "block" a turn which you have to play before a player rolls, which effectively skips them, and free roll which allow you to roll for a total of 4 times in a turn rather than 3, which is good if you need just one dice more for that complex purple picture.

The only question the groups I played with had were "do you continue to add to the gallery" or only have 7 cards showing at anyone time?" If you only have 7 showing the game seems to end up with people stealing a lot to either block other players from a win, while the other method of draw and add to the gallery seems to add in a situation where your just waiting for the right combo of colors to appear and tends to favor the starting player since they started the game and effectively won a card each round.

Our games consisted of players usually constructing the more complex shapes/pictures first then fighting for/stealing the easy one, two, three dice cards for the win.

Conclusion: Great Game lots of fun. Well made. Definite party game. Fast and furious. For adults its a good "drinking game" and for kids it's a good drink........err game to learn abstract methods of constructing things.

It's a steal for $6.00 bucks when it was on sale at Toys R Us. I think it normally runs 9.99.
 
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Ryan W
United States
Reno
Nevada
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Just to add a couple of notes on this: I recently purchased this for my nephew for his birthday, and we played a couple of times over the weekend.

As far as color-blindness, the deluxe version that I bought at Barnes and Noble has the name of the color printed on the card. So no need to look at the number of dice to figure out the color.

We played that no matter what happened in a turn, you flipped a card and put it into the gallery. There does not appear to be a limitation on the number of cards that can be in the gallery. In fact, I think the game would come to a grinding halt if that were the case.

Another reason to steal is that there is a low number of Orange and Red cards in the deck. So you mostly have to steal to get them. Plus, stealing more complex doodles would be a mistake, since you always have more flexibility in the gallery.

I must admit I enjoyed playing this game. It was fun to try and match the doodles. I'm tempted to purchase a copy for myself to play with my son.
 
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Betty Dingus
United States
Austin
Texas
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We thought the rules said you must flip a card for the Gallery before rolling your dice -- otherwise you lose your turn. Many of us lost our turns to the great glee of the others. I tried to institute a Grownups get a Reminder rule, but that only lasted one game.

We never noticed a shortage of cards, but we did find the Gallery full of purple by the end. The games drag on because of stealing, and last time half the group wandered away before the end -- never a good sign.

Also there's a lot of downtime if people analyze every single possibility and backup plan and the odds. Especially with a lot of people. There's also a lot of debate about "Steal his card, he's winning" and "Block her because she has four cards!" "Yes but they're the hard/easy color." And so on.

Still this was greatly enjoyed by the kids (ages 12-17) and us grownups enjoyed it in a Yahtzee kind of way with the bonus of the pictures to critique.
 
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