Recommend
12 
 Thumb up
 Hide
39 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Go» Forums » General

Subject: I implore you – learn to play Go, and stick with it. rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Matt F
United States
Newcastle
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Let me say this without qualification: Go is the best board game of all time, and it's not particularly close.

If you learn it, and stick with it long enough to fully grasp just how amazing it is, it will enrich your gaming time and be a lifelong source of joy.

The problem is, despite the extremely simple rules, it can take a long time to understand the game at a level that will get you hooked.

Starting with a 9x9 board, you may be intrigued by the tactics but unimpressed by the overall gameplay. Moving up to the 19x19 board, you will at first feel quite lost and totally overwhelmed from start to finish. It may seem like you're randomly plunking down pieces, yet the true "meaning" of those moves eludes you.

But, I implore you, don't give up! Stick with it! I promise, great gaming lies ahead.

(Most of) those who know how to play Go well love to teach the game to others; the more players, the merrier! So, look up your local Go club and learn in-person from local players. Or, go online and play as often as you can. They say it can take 100 games before you truly get what's going on, and I don't doubt for a second that this is true.

And, judging from my own experience, the best way to learn is to be unmercifully punished every time you make a mistake, so don't shy away from playing against better/higher-ranked players. Early on, you will lose, and you will lose a lot. You will make the same mistakes over and over.

But eventually, you will stop making those mistakes. Your scores will slowly rise. You'll start to beat rookie players, play competitively against similarly ranked players, and your handicap games against stronger players won't be the bloodbaths they once were.

This is when you will start to crave another match... and another... and another. If you make it to this beautiful promised land, congratulations. I have a feeling you will look back at the time you put in learning the game and feel it was definitely time well spent.

So... get GOing. (Pun intended.)

This is a good place to start: http://playgo.to/iwtg/en/

I also suggest playing online at Kiseido (KGS): https://www.gokgs.com/

After you have a fairly good grasp of the game, I strongly recommend the book Lessons in the Fundamentals of Go by Kageyama; it's actually an entertaining book, yet it also contains lots of helpful strategy.












22 
 Thumb up
0.80
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Stephen Tavener
United Kingdom
London
England
flag msg tools
designer
The overtext below is true.
badge
The overtext above is false.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
Moving up to the 18x18 board

I applaud your enthusiasm. Go is indeed a great game; though, if you look around the site you'll find a few others that might compete.

You do know that go is usually played on a 19x19 board, not 18x18, right?

I'd also recommend the "Graded go problems for beginners" series as an excellent way of improving your life and death skills.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt F
United States
Newcastle
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
mrraow wrote:
Quote:
Moving up to the 18x18 board

I applaud your enthusiasm. Go is indeed a great game; though, if you look around the site you'll find a few others that might compete.

You do know that go is usually played on a 19x19 board, not 18x18, right?

I'd also recommend the "Graded go problems for beginners" series as an excellent way of improving your life and death skills.


I know, it's subjective, there are certainly many great games. (But... honestly, I sort of think Go is the best in an OBJECTIVE way! )

Ha, I just corrected it to say 19x19. A mental error - not the first, or the last.

Yes, go problems are a great way to practice as well. Many online!

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
ARTHUR REILLY
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Bravo for posting one of the nicest and interesting posts I have ever come across here on boardgamegeek. I agree with you 100%, and you worded it all absolutely perfectly. I have owned a profession board and stones with cups for many years, but haven't played in a very long time. Indeed, this game is one hell of a challenge, that definitely worth taking on for the brave and persistent.

As a side note:

There a version of Hnefatafl - The Copenhagen Version, that's perhaps the 2nd oldest game in the world and the next most interesting. So I believe at least, that all you had to say, applies to this game as well.

Thank you so much for your wonderful efforts.

Sincerely,

Arthur Reilly
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Ah, Go enthusiasm!

mofo83 wrote:
Go is the best board game of all time,

I've been playing Go for two decades (with the good fortune of learning it from a coworker, so several of us were all newbies progressing and playing together, plus I found a local club in my city soon thereafter). I have also played & enjoyed many hundreds of other games as well, many of them quite excellent... And for me too, Go remains the greatest of all games.*

And indeed a local club can be a great thing for learning and camaraderie. Not only for playing against stronger players, but also for being able to find similar-strength players to enjoy even games, and for strategy discussion + game review, for comparing notes on equipment and books, etc.

Also agreed that KGS is quite nice for online play, and Graded Go Problems for Beginners is a quite useful fun problem series!


* For many years Go was the only game which I rated 10 at BGG. Finally this year I gave 10 to a second game, Shogi...
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan Thunkd
United States
Florence
MA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
russ wrote:
And indeed a local club can be a great thing for learning and camaraderie. Not only for playing against stronger players, but also for being able to find similar-strength players to enjoy even games, and for strategy discussion + game review, for comparing notes on equipment and books, etc.
I cannot stress enough how much a good Go community can really help. I discovered Go five years ago after moving across country. Luckily, there's a very active Go community where I live, especially considering that it's not an especially urban area (one of the perks of living near many colleges). Our club has several Dan level players including a 4D and 7D who are good at teaching. Playing against stronger players, and especially reviewing the games afterwards, has been an incredible help in getting better at Go.

Just being able to play someone over the board is crucial for me. While I enjoy playing online as well, I can't imagine not having the ability to play in person. Sadly, I know that for some people that's their only option. I highly recommend that you search out and attend a Go club if there's one remotely close to you.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Virginia Milne
New Zealand
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Go will last you a lifetime. GO NEVER WEARS OUT!!!

I play at a local Go club, Chess club and several local board game meetups where Euro games and a smattering of Ameritrash gets played.

Nobody ever hungers after the next expansion for Go to stop it going stale

I have trouble getting my older Euro games to the table. "Play the new hotness, the new games are so better these days. Hey! I gotta new exansion on kick starter."

To be honest, these "zealots of the moment" have conceded that in five years time, their present games will probably be forgotten and they will be playing the new! better! games of the future.

All glory to Go!, ha ha laugh
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Some Guy
United States
flag msg tools
Avatar
I agree that Go is the greatest game of all time. I started playing it maybe 8 or 9 years ago. I take breaks often because it's hard to find people to play with. (And also, when I start playing a lot of Go, and studying it often, then I end up seeing little Gobans filling with stones when I close my eyes. It makes it very difficult to sleep, so I stop playing. I'm not trying to pull a Bobby Fischer.)

The only thing I will say, and maybe this makes me a jerk, but I HATE HATE HATE teaching Go to others. If you already know how to play, I would love to sit down and have a game with you, but don't ask me to teach you. In my experience, people don't often want to do any learning or studying on their own, the expect me to just sit down with them and fill their heads with everything I know and they will magically become better players. It's very stressful and annoying for me, and playing games with beginners is often very boring and not challenging for the better player.

Yes, I know how much of a jerk I sound like right now, but I have tried to teach several people and it always ends up the same. Maybe if someone was to come up to me and say "Hey, I bought a book and spent the entire weekend learning go! Do you wanna play? I want to see if I got any better!" Then I would be over-the-moon to play with that person. But most people sit down to play Go, then every thought about the game leaves their head when the game is over, and the next time they see me they just want me to teach them more. It's stressful, I tell ya!

Sorry for the rant.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
ARTHUR REILLY
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I do indeed love and own a professional set of "Go". Played in a couple of Tournaments many years ago and was ranked as an advanced beginner. The two things that always bothered me about the game was:

1. Trying to score the game at the end.
2. Trying to decide when the game was actually over

Maybe I need a better way of doing those things. But in any case it's an endless Classic.

Enjoy,

Arthur Reilly
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt F
United States
Newcastle
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
MENAREUS2000 wrote:


1. Trying to score the game at the end.
2. Trying to decide when the game was actually over



Hey Arthur,

I don't know exactly how many games you played, but these things become almost automatic once one progresses to a certain proficiency. And I'm not even talking Dan ranking... mid to low Kyus even. I have a feeling you maybe stopped playing juuuuust before you reached this level!

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt F
United States
Newcastle
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Shuko wrote:


It's very stressful and annoying for me, and playing games with beginners is often very boring and not challenging for the better player.

Maybe if someone was to come up to me and say "Hey, I bought a book and spent the entire weekend learning go! Do you wanna play? I want to see if I got any better!" Then I would be over-the-moon to play with that person.



I do understand what you're saying, though I don't share the same anxiety.

I think part of the problem is that people see Go and think it's just like any other mainstream board game, most of which you can "master" in a few sittings. (It doesn't help that it looks a lot like Othello!)

Like you said, the ones whose interest is sparked and really take the time to "study" are the ones to pour your time into!

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt F
United States
Newcastle
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
russ wrote:


* For many years Go was the only game which I rated 10 at BGG. Finally this year I gave 10 to a second game, Shogi...


I really want to try Shogi! I was fortunate enough to visit Korea a few years back and most of the men I saw around the city were actually playing Shogi, not Go!


 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt F
United States
Newcastle
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Since this post has now attracted some Go fans, I'll relate a story that further illustrates how special Go can be:

I was fortunate enough to travel to Korea a few years back; while planning the trip, one of the things I definitely wanted to do was to find a group of old guys playing Go in a park (which I had seen in pictures before), and possibly play with them.

The entire trip, I would peek into the small parks we walked by, looking for that iconic Go group, but I barely saw a single game being played anywhere in Seoul. (As I mentioned, it seemed Shogi was actually more popular for a quick, casual game.) I did find two turned-wood go bowls for $8 at a flea market, which have become perhaps my favorite souvenirs of all time!

Finally, on the last full day of the vacation, we took the subway to a different part of the city, where a huge street market was being held. Just beyond the market, we turned into a large park and there were DOZENS (perhaps 100+) of old Korean guys playing Go! Needless to say, I was pretty excited.

The Korean-speaking member of our group found the "leader" of this little Go-in-the-park "league," told him my ranking, and he quickly found someone of similar strength to play with me.

As we sat down at the board on some cardboard "seats," a huge group of old guys started to circle around us, talking excitedly. Apparently, despite the proximity to an American military base, they had NEVER encountered a caucasian-looking American who actually knew how to play Go! As I (somewhat poorly) plunked down the "proper" Josecki, they were truly amazed that I had even this elementary knowledge of the game.

Unfortunately, I think the excitement of the situation threw me off, and I made a pretty bad blunder fairly early on in the game. Bad enough that a lot of guys started to walk away, seeing that my opponent and I were perhaps not that closely matched after all. (Apparently some of the other players even accused the poor guy of lying about his rank!) I played well enough through the mid-game, but had my Korean-speaking friend resign for me before the end game. I was a little bummed that I hadn't played up to my usual level in my one Korean Go opportunity.

However, afterwards, one of the old guys came up to me, grabbed my hand, raised it in the air, and said in his broken English, "Number One American Champion!" So, despite my loss, I felt pretty good about it after all.

So... knowing how to play Go, and traveling in Korea/Japan/China, can lead to some pretty cool experiences!

10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
ARTHUR REILLY
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
mofo83 wrote:
MENAREUS2000 wrote:


1. Trying to score the game at the end.
2. Trying to decide when the game was actually over



Hey Arthur,

I don't know exactly how many games you played, but these things become almost automatic once one progresses to a certain proficiency. And I'm not even talking Dan ranking... mid to low Kyus even. I have a feeling you maybe stopped playing juuuuust before you reached this level!



From what I remember, after my last tournament, I was ranked: 10th kyu
As far as the scoring and knowing when they game was finally over, I could do those things, but just found them a pain.

Later, I got into chess, which turned out not to be my thing and then went on to play backgammon for many years, beating many of the top champions at the time and winning quite a few of tournaments. Now backgammon is my 2nd favorite game, with Hnefatafl - Copenhagen Version, being #1.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan Thunkd
United States
Florence
MA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
MENAREUS2000 wrote:
mofo83 wrote:
MENAREUS2000 wrote:


1. Trying to score the game at the end.
2. Trying to decide when the game was actually over



Hey Arthur,

I don't know exactly how many games you played, but these things become almost automatic once one progresses to a certain proficiency. And I'm not even talking Dan ranking... mid to low Kyus even. I have a feeling you maybe stopped playing juuuuust before you reached this level!



From what I remember, after my last tournament, I was ranked: 10th kyu
As far as the scoring and knowing when they game was finally over, I could do those things, but just found them a pain.
A 10 Kyu player shouldn't have any problem determining when the game is over. I wouldn't think that anyone better than 15 kyu would have a problem with that. Unless something dies it's mostly just solidifying the borders and making endgame plays. Occasionally there's a tricky situation where you think you're filling dame and you're actually taking liberties away from a group and that can destabilize some group... but that really shouldn't happening at 10 kyu.

Scoring the game isn't hard either. The worst part is moving stones around to make easily countable areas (10 point rectangles, 20 point rectangles, etc.) Counting the score during the game is much harder.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
mofo83 wrote:
russ wrote:


* For many years Go was the only game which I rated 10 at BGG. Finally this year I gave 10 to a second game, Shogi...


I really want to try Shogi! I was fortunate enough to visit Korea a few years back and most of the men I saw around the city were actually playing Shogi, not Go!

Interesting! I wonder if it was not literally standard Shogi (which AFAIK only has anything approaching mainstream popularity in Japan) but rather Annan Shogi (a Shogi variant apparently popular in Korea) (or perhaps Changgi)?

(Curiously, I learned about Annan Shogi a few weeks ago but was just told it was a wacky Shogi variant in which when a piece has a friendly piece on the square directly behind it, it has the movement of that piece instead of its own... Only thanks to this thread prompting me to research Korean Shogi did I discover that this variant is relatively popular / established in Korea. Yay BGG. BTW this wacky variant is fun and well worth trying!)
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
ARTHUR REILLY
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Thunkd wrote:
MENAREUS2000 wrote:
mofo83 wrote:
MENAREUS2000 wrote:


1. Trying to score the game at the end.
2. Trying to decide when the game was actually over



Hey Arthur,

I don't know exactly how many games you played, but these things become almost automatic once one progresses to a certain proficiency. And I'm not even talking Dan ranking... mid to low Kyus even. I have a feeling you maybe stopped playing juuuuust before you reached this level!



From what I remember, after my last tournament, I was ranked: 10th kyu
As far as the scoring and knowing when they game was finally over, I could do those things, but just found them a pain.
A 10 Kyu player shouldn't have any problem determining when the game is over. I wouldn't think that anyone better than 15 kyu would have a problem with that. Unless something dies it's mostly just solidifying the borders and making endgame plays. Occasionally there's a tricky situation where you think you're filling dame and you're actually taking liberties away from a group and that can destabilize some group... but that really shouldn't happening at 10 kyu.

Scoring the game isn't hard either. The worst part is moving stones around to make easily countable areas (10 point rectangles, 20 point rectangles, etc.) Counting the score during the game is much harder.


Not everyone's experience is the same. I never said I had a problem doing these things, just that I found them a pain, and not an enjoyable part of the wonderful simplicity of the game itself. I still think it's the best and most interesting game in the world. Also keep in mind, to get very good at some of the games we're talking about on here requires a life time of commitment. At least if you want to get to the world class level, which has always been my goal with all the games I played.

Thanks,

Arthur Reilly
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
MENAREUS2000 wrote:
Also keep in mind, to get very good at some of the games we're talking about on here requires a life time of commitment. At least if you want to get to the world class level, which has always been my goal with all the games I played.

99.99999% of the people who play Go are not going to reach the top level... it's a pretty unrealistic goal.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
ARTHUR REILLY
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
russ wrote:
MENAREUS2000 wrote:
Also keep in mind, to get very good at some of the games we're talking about on here requires a life time of commitment. At least if you want to get to the world class level, which has always been my goal with all the games I played.

99.99999% of the people who play Go are not going to reach the top level... it's a pretty unrealistic goal.


I actually agree with you but for the fact that it only applies to people that give up. I wasn't one of them.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt F
United States
Newcastle
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
russ wrote:
mofo83 wrote:
russ wrote:


* For many years Go was the only game which I rated 10 at BGG. Finally this year I gave 10 to a second game, Shogi...


I really want to try Shogi! I was fortunate enough to visit Korea a few years back and most of the men I saw around the city were actually playing Shogi, not Go!

Interesting! I wonder if it was not literally standard Shogi (which AFAIK only has anything approaching mainstream popularity in Japan) but rather Annan Shogi (a Shogi variant apparently popular in Korea) (or perhaps Changgi)?

(Curiously, I learned about Annan Shogi a few weeks ago but was just told it was a wacky Shogi variant in which when a piece has a friendly piece on the square directly behind it, it has the movement of that piece instead of its own... Only thanks to this thread prompting me to research Korean Shogi did I discover that this variant is relatively popular / established in Korea. Yay BGG. BTW this wacky variant is fun and well worth trying!)


I think you are right, it might have been Changgi, actually!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Matt F
United States
Newcastle
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
MENAREUS2000 wrote:
russ wrote:
MENAREUS2000 wrote:
Also keep in mind, to get very good at some of the games we're talking about on here requires a life time of commitment. At least if you want to get to the world class level, which has always been my goal with all the games I played.

99.99999% of the people who play Go are not going to reach the top level... it's a pretty unrealistic goal.


I actually agree with you but for the fact that it only applies to people that give up. I wasn't one of them.



I'm actually going to agree with Russ on this one... unless one begins playing Go at a VERY early age, studies with a world-class player, and completely devotes oneself to studying the game (e.g., it is a 100% full-time job), there is almost no chance of becoming a "world-class" player.

Am I saying you should give up the goal of reaching that level? Certainly not. But his 99.99999% figure is probably about right.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan Thunkd
United States
Florence
MA
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
mofo83 wrote:
I'm actually going to agree with Russ on this one... unless one begins playing Go at a VERY early age, studies with a world-class player, and completely devotes oneself to studying the game (e.g., it is a 100% full-time job), there is almost no chance of becoming a "world-class" player.

Am I saying you should give up the goal of reaching that level? Certainly not. But his 99.99999% figure is probably about right.
Agreed.

Below is a snippet from an announcement on USGO.org about Shawn Ray (4D), where he talked about wanting to become a professional (i.e. world class) player. Most players will be lucky to get to the 4 Dan level in the first place. But it seems pretty clear from what he wrote that he couldn't become a world class player without devoting a lot more time and effort to it than most people would be willing to.

Quote:
“Thanks to the success of my YouTube channeI, I was offered a job at BadukTV – on the condition that I relocate to Korea,” Ray told the E-Journal. “I took this opportunity to move to Seoul and study baduk (go in Korean) seriously. I am planning to stay until I become 9D and then I want to come back to America to become a Pro player in the AGA.” Ray’s first video for BadukTV, which includes a fun animated opening, is available here.

“I chose Blackie’s International Baduk Academy (BIBA), as it was the only baduk school that I knew of that spoke English,” said Ray. “Since arriving, I have learned how to truly study baduk, and how many hours you really have to put into this game to become strong. I am sure many are interested in my training schedule so I will break it down. We wake up and get to BIBA around 11 or noon, and stay until 9 pm. Once we arrive it is self-study until about 2pm, then we play league games with players stronger and weaker than ourselves. In between games we do more self-study, until about 5 or 6 pm and then go eat dinner. We get back around 7 pm and Blackie (9p) reviews our games, or goes over pro games with us and helps us understand them. It is nice when a 9P helps you review pro games, because then you can see that they are human too and also make mistakes. Just mistakes you would never notice being an amateur! Once 9 pm hits, we all go home together. Once we get home, some of us do more studying, or we can relax until we go to sleep.”

“Our self-study consists of reviewing at least 4 pro games a day, doing at least 1 hour, or more, of life and death problems. Problems at your level can take anywhere from 1-5 min. Usually we go through nearly 100 problems per week. We also study Baduk books and analyze positions and new openings or joseki. It is a very intensive schedule to maintain and can mentally exhaust you very quickly. It took me a whole week before I was fully able to deal with the training regimen,” said Ray.
http://www.usgo.org/news/2014/07/baduktv-hires-shawn-ray/

TLDR; Unless you're willing to make it your primary goal, I doubt you have any ability to become a world class Go player... and even then it's probably only possible to people who show more of a natural aptitude for it than any of us here on this forum.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
MENAREUS2000 wrote:
russ wrote:
MENAREUS2000 wrote:
Also keep in mind, to get very good at some of the games we're talking about on here requires a life time of commitment. At least if you want to get to the world class level, which has always been my goal with all the games I played.

99.99999% of the people who play Go are not going to reach the top level... it's a pretty unrealistic goal.


I actually agree with you but for the fact that it only applies to people that give up. I wasn't one of them.

Well, knock a few 9's off the end to make it apply to the fraction of Go players who don't give up. Persistence is necessary, but certainly not sufficient, to reach top level. (That's not just about Go, of course, but about any difficult skill practiced by millions of people.)

(Which in no way means that it's pointless to persist. The journey, the progress, the enjoyment, and all that jazz.)
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bwian, just
United States
Longmont
Colorado
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I've learned it, played it, stuck with it. (One Go club claimed I was on the order of 6-8 kyu, although they were probably a bit generous based on my play since then. I've also forgotten what few joseki I'd managed to learn.)

It's just... Go is an abstract. Only two players. No theme. If I want to play an abstract, it's an excellent choice. I just rarely want to do so.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael B. Hansen
Denmark
Odense N
flag msg tools
badge
"duck duck duck duck duck duck duck duck duck duck duck duck duck duck duck duck" Ralph Wiggum .....
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It seems to me, that a lot of people are intimidated by what they think is a hard game that they have to master to enjoy. This is far from true. I have enjoyed Go at all levels ever since i started back in the 80's.

I have seen new players be introduced to Go, through Joseki and Tesuji, and that i think is a serious mistake.
I firmly believe that they will have more fun being introduced to a few of what some consider more advanced concepts, like thickness, shapes and gote/sente. I never teach the game on a 9x9 board because i think it forces an introduction to tesuji to early.
I agree with OP, more people need to play this, relax on getting to dan, and just enjoy the game.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.