Recommend
15 
 Thumb up
 Hide
3 Posts

Die fiesen 7» Forums » Reviews

Subject: They're mean to me and I love it rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Hilko Drude
Germany
Goettingen
Lower Saxony
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
What are you doing!? I don't even know you!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
One of the games which hadn't received too much Essen buzz around here (the bgg entry appeared a few days after the show) is Die fiesen 7 by Jacques Zeimet, published by Drei Hasen in der Abendsonne, illustrated by Rolf Vogt. Sounds familiar? You are an expert, then – that's the same people (designer, artist, publishing people) who once made Cockroach Salad. And it is inevitable that I'll mention that game again in this review.

Here's how Die fiesen 7 works:
There are seven criminals on five different cards: One criminal, two criminals, one criminal with a cell phone, two criminals with cell phones, one criminal looking into the barrel of a gun.



All cards are dealt out to the players to form a draw pile for each of them. Taking turn, the players now flip over the top card of their draw piles and place it on a discard pile in the middle. While doing that, they have to count (counting how many people are present to divide the loot). Counting goes from one to seven, then back down to one, then back up to seven and so on. A player who makes a mistake or thinks too long has to take the entire discard pile. But why would you make a mistake at all? Well, aside from accidentally counting beyond seven to eight, there are rules to be observed for the different cards. Cards with two criminals mean you have to say two numbers and the next player skips a turn (a very common source for errors, the next player often flips open a card accidentally). Moreover, a criminal with a cell phone cannot focus on the counting, so instead, he just clears his throat. A criminal looking at a gun is silent altogether. With several cards with phones and guns in a row, focussing on skipping turns and so on, players do lose track of the counting. Sometimes you can see it in the face of a player (especially when playing with kids), but there is always hope to play a cell phone or gun card to push the problem onto the next player. The first player to get rid of his/her cards is the winner.

So far so good, it is really similar to Cockroach Salad in its concept. Can that work? Yes, it can, and it does. First of all, while I love Cockroach Salad, I got rather good at it after some plays and rarely lost at all. If all players are really good at it, it does build up tension (because the pile gets higher and higher), but can also be a bit repetitive.
Die Fiesen 7 tackles these „problems“ in two ways. Firstly, the rhythm of the game is disrupted by the double cards which force players to skip a turn once in a while (also keeping tension high when two players have few cards left – it's not entirely predictable who will go out first. This is (in the basic game) the main source for errors. The second improvement is even more decisive: When you have played the game for a few times, the "mean rule" is introduced. When you use it (and you should!), the first player flipping over a cell phone card doesn't have to clear his/her throat, but can choose any noise/word/whatever instead. From now on till the end of the round (until someone collects the pile) all players playing cell phone cards have to copy that sound/word/whatever. This doesn't just cause raucuous laughter among the players (depending on what the players come up with, but yes, this might include numbers which should of course not change the counting in your head), but it also makes sure that the game stays fresh over a longer time.

All in all, I prefer Die Fiesen 7 to Cockroach Salad. It has everything a short game needs - somewhat typical for Zeimet's designs, in my opinion. And of course Vogt's illustrations are a perfect fit (though maybe not as daring as in the cockroach series). If you liked its predecessor, you will most likely love it. If building longterm strategies is the only thing you're after, stay clear of it. I am definitely curious to see how well this will do in the market. Whether its success will increase the visibility of this still small publisher or be limited by it, remains to be seen. It easily has the potential to be Drei Hasen in der Abendsonne's most successful game to date, if the word gets out.


13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Anthony C
United States
Ferndale
Michigan
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Do you think there's an even distribution of the different types of cards or is the plain gangster the most prevalent and all the rest are much less? I feel like in a simple game like this, the more special cards, the better.

I also haven't played Cockroach Salad but love Cockroach Poker. I tried Mogel Motte (Cheating Moth) but thought there were too many special cards and not enough clear direction as to what they would do. This one seems to solve that problem. I also like that it isn't a "see who can slap the pile fastest" type of game.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Hilko Drude
Germany
Goettingen
Lower Saxony
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
What are you doing!? I don't even know you!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I haven't counted the cards, but while the plain gangster is the most common card, there are enough special cards to ensure that often enough, several of them appear in a row, which is what causes the greatest confusion. In my opinion, card distribution is well-balanced. If there were too many special cards, there wouldn't be enough situations in which you would actually have to say a number. The silent cards, for instance, are great for the player who plays them (doesn't have to think), but build up pressure for the next player(s). If there were too many of them, there would be less laughter.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.