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Subject: WIP - Rudaea TCG (An Upcoming Physical TCG/CCG) rss

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Trevor Yung
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TL;DR - This is a pretty long post because I like to discuss some of the theory and reasoning behind the game. If you want, just scroll to the bottom and check out our website!


Hey guys, I'm Shugo, and I've been playing trading card games ever since I was a kid. They've been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. Although I would quit them at times, I always found my way back to them eventually.

I played Magic The Gathering on and off for many years, but stopped playing due to lack of people to play with, and it became pretty expensive.. haha. I've been playing Hearthstone ever since the Closed Beta and never really stopped playing till this day. I had a few short breaks, but it's a great game, and of course that's why all of you are here.

Around October last year, I was inspired to start working on my own card game with some good friends who also shared the same desires as myself. However, due to a bit of conflict and other issues, it got postponed and set aside. However, my main partner and I decided to proceed with the project and here we are now!

Rudaea is a card game that has some similarities to Hearthstone and Magic The Gathering, but also some very refreshing differences. However, we've been designing this game with some key differences of opinion that go against those of these two giants. I'm sure a lot of you have seen or heard of the reasoning's why Blizzard (and other companies) design "Bad Cards". You can check out Kripparian's video on Youtube if you haven't to get a better idea. There's also an old article written about ten years ago by Mark Rosewater; one of MTG's head developers. The points are still relevant to this day. But you know what? We don't believe in some of these.

Note: I have high respect for the developers of these games. While I don't agree with some of their opinions, please know I am not against them in any way.

Bad Cards Must Exist - While I do understand their reasoning that card power is relative, and this means some cards will just be worse than others.. I really don't think there needs to be strictly "bad cards". Mark Rosewater made the argument how bad cards are good for new players so that they have more room to "discover" new cards, and then realize why those ones are bad. He also stated how power level needs to be divided among rarities. While I believe that part to be true, I do think that Rares don't need to be bad. You can still have great Rares, but also some great Uncommons and Commons.

The reason he said the power needs to be split upon rarities is to help newer players get into the game easier. What confuses me, is he also stated it's better to have bad cards so that the more "skilled" player will be rewarded. He said if all cards were good, then it would lesser differentiate the new players for the experienced.. Wait a minute.. What!? Was there not a point about rarity power levels making it easier for newer players? What I really don't understand is.. Isn't it a GOOD thing if a new player could better compete with an experienced player? We all know that the experienced player will still have an edge, even if both players have good cards. Besides, you all know that anyone could "Netdeck" if they wanted to. It won't be long until those new players ditch the bad cards.. And if they don't, doesn't losing with them just make their experience worse? Sorry if this was bit of a rambling post.. But I strongly disagree with this point.

One last note on this. Mark Rosewater also said that people like to find "hidden treasures". Essentially, it's fun for players to discover a deck that can utilize a "bad" or "underplayed" card. You know, I do agree with this. But when you have some cards which are strictly worse than everything else, in every aspect.. There isn't much you can do with that. What if all the cards were at least "playable". Now, of course that is relative to power.. But if every card at least had fair stats, and a sort of ability, then you've certainly got a whole lot more possibilities to experiment with.

Soooooooo! That finally brings me back to Rudaea. In this game, there are NO vanilla creatures. While some creatures' abilities may be a bit simpler than others, every card will AT LEAST have one ability. We understand some will still be "unplayable". Though the level of "unplayability" should be less, and it may even make you consider some cards as a better option for some decks.

Okay I think that's all. If you did read this whole post, props to you. I hope at least a few of you found my thoughts about the "Bad Card" theory interesting. The last thing I'd like to mention is our game is only in development. We are looking to build a community to become a part of it and help us play test the game. The PDF file to download, print, and play with, is currently unavailable at this time.. But should be up and running within a week (I'm hoping)!

http://www.rudaea.com

You can also search for our Facebook page; Rudaea Trading Card Game.

Check us out, leave a comment, check out our forums (although there won't be too much to say on there yet), and give us some feedback! You can also PM me on here, or on our forum if you need to contact me.

Thank you for your time!

- Shugo

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Andrew Rowse
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I guess the obvious first question is 'why a TCG, when the overwhelming majority of evidence points to TCG being a dead model for all but the very top dogs (Yugioh, Magic)?'

Even the LCG model is a frequent non-starter for new games. There've been plenty of kickstarter TCGs and LCGs that have failed despite nice art and gameplay that looked at least fairly compelling, and I suspect that many of them would have fared better if they'd positioned the game to be playable out of the box without requiring players to build a deck between games.

Take a look at Smash Up's 'shufflebuilding' mechanic. Imagine extending that to 15 card modules, then building a deck by combining four random modules. Would that work for your game?
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Steven Tu
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Everyone getting into video game dev thinks they can make the next big MMO, everyone getting into card game dev thinks they can make the next big TCG, everyone getting into web app dev thinks they can make the next Facebook.
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Trevor Yung
Canada
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Tuism wrote:
Everyone getting into video game dev thinks they can make the next big MMO, everyone getting into card game dev thinks they can make the next big TCG, everyone getting into web app dev thinks they can make the next Facebook.


Why not strive for it to be the best, rather than settle for seconds. That's not to say that we're cocky and think we're the best, but would like to give it our all to create something that people will like, and hopefully fix some problems that the "Giants" have.
 
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Andrew Rowse
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Shugo wrote:
Tuism wrote:
Everyone getting into video game dev thinks they can make the next big MMO, everyone getting into card game dev thinks they can make the next big TCG, everyone getting into web app dev thinks they can make the next Facebook.


Why not strive for it to be the best, rather than settle for seconds. That's not to say that we're cocky and think we're the best, but would like to give it our all to create something that people will like, and hopefully fix some problems that the "Giants" have.


It's an admirable goal, but bear in mind what sets MMOs, TCGs and Facebook apart:
* They rely on a large userbase - if you're the only person in your town who plays a TCG, it's nigh unplayable.
* They have large infrastructure costs

Acquiring a large userbase from scratch means doing a lot of advertising and networking. Are you in a position to do that? Do you have past successes that you can leverage to bring a ready-made fanbase? Are you prepared to risk a ton of money on a targeted advertising campaign? Is your product sufficiently distinct/superior to Magic/Hearthstone that you will be able to convince players to leave behind their investment and switch games?

(Your art is quite nice, but it's not Magic-level. Your graphic design looks like Redemption!)

Consider Ascension: Deckbuilding Game - created by Magic Pro Tour champions (I think) to be the sort of game that would appeal to them and their fellow Magic players, but using a deckbuilding rather than TCG format. That meant that a single Magic player could pick up a copy and know that he had a full set, playable with three other dudes and without eating into his Magic deck construction time.

I think that's what you need to consider - how can you modify your product to slot into a 'hole' in your target demographic's game world?

Good luck! Remember that almost everybody who advises against making a TCG has probably themselves spent time designing (and giving up on) a TCG of their own!

(My first time was in the wake of Magic's Fallen Empires and was about vampires, and the second was a deck-cycling game loosely based on Rage.)
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