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Subject: Learning how to sculpt my minis rss

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Vicente Sivera Catala
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Hello there,

I'm thinking about learning some zBrush and try to do some of my own minis.

Anyone on this forum could point me to some good learning resources for that. Specifically about 3D for printing.

I messed around with 3D modelling in my university years. And while I was not good, I could certainly do some stuff.

Also I don't believe 3D artist are expensive, they charge what they should. It's just that I don't have the dough for paying them.
 
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Francesco Pizzo
Italy
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Zbrush central is full of tutorial.
About modelling and 3d printing also don't underestimate blender 3d:
is free, is very powerful, in some task is more enough, for hard surface modelling is more complete, efficient and fast compared to Zbrush and to be honest I using it more than zbrush.
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Vicente Sivera Catala
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Thanks for the advice. I will definitely check blender too.
 
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Jerry Martin
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This is 100% new to me. But my work just got a 3D printer and I have permission to use it as I like. Can Blender be used for that type of printing?

The Zbrush is not even in the realm of affordable.
 
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Francesco Pizzo
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Sure, I'm a professional sculptor, working for many miniatures company (Dust, Mantic etc. etc.) and I using Blender on daily base for my sculpting work (here you can download my portfolio and resume: http://www.mediafire.com/download/pk999bjd4m5k895/Francesco_...
you can download blender for free here:
www.blender.org
On blender site you can find a tutorial for 3d printing (very basic shape), also there is book and free tutorial around the net.
http://www.blender3d.org/e-shop/product_info_n.php?products_...

Zbrush can handle more dense meshes, also have more brushes, but are the only advantage I think zbrush have over blender in our market field (last blender release improve a lot viewport capabilities)

Here a series of tutorials for sculpting:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekw-pg3PS_U (is a playlist)
Free blender introduction (don't forget blender is not only a digital sculpt software, but also an animation package, rendering, polygonal modelling, VFX, compositing software and more):
https://cgcookie.com/flow/introduction-to-blender/
Here and advanced sculpting tutorial (not free):
https://cgcookie.com/course/modeling-a-sci-fi-helmet/

also don't forget there is a lot of free and commercial addon for blender, the most I used are free:
- Pie Menu (the wazu variant is my favourite)
- Retopo addon

Also, before start I suggest you, in user preference, to set "selection on left mouse button" and "release to confirm". Also you can vary a bit the blender interface colour in "theme"

Go to Blenderartists for any doubts you have about, the community is pretty supportive, also you can see on the gallery very great art done with blender. There is a lot to study, but worth it.
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Vicente Sivera Catala
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Francesco is a top-notch artist. I checked your stuff some months ago and it looks awesome.

Thanks for this tutorials. I was looking for specific tutorials for brushes and stuff, but only found how to sculpt extruding polygons and stuff...
 
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Francesco Pizzo
Italy
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Thanks for the kind words about my work

what you mean for tutorial about brushes?
I don't know what is your level about, anyway what you need is create shapes. Zbrush, blender, mudbox, maya etc. etc. all using polygons for creating shapes. Zbrush, mudbox, sculptris, blender sculpt module etc. push and add polygons in way very similar to traditional sculpt, but in many cases you can do the some with polygonal modelling in particular way for hard surface (zbrush added polygonal modelling only in the last release), in polygonal modelling you add vertex, faces and extrude in a more technical way. At the beginning is less intuitive, but is a way you can use to learn, and IMO is better to understood digital.
Before start thinking about miniatures, first, learn what polygons are, subdivision, edge, vertex etc. etc. this is the basic and you'll learning better if try polygonal modelling instead digital sculpt. After this concentrating yourself on shapes, how obtain a shape you want (Dismantle complex shapes in simple shapes and then refine it). A good way is start with polygonal modelling, defining shapes and volumes, than refine with digital sculpt.
I self-taught, and was a long process (I started to learn back in 2006, and never stop, started with traditional sculpt)

After learned it, than pass about 3d printing and miniature related issue, but this is your last problem, before this you must be capable to modelling the shapes you want (humans, weapons etc. etc.

This is a job done with blender, look the video preview, the instructor is very capable and is very well explained:
https://cgcookie.com/course/modeling-a-sci-fi-helmet/
is a good tutorial, but without run, start from the basic, the net is full of basic tutorial, for every software you'll choice to learn.
Be patient, read, practice, watch, practice and try and try again.
good luck

 
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Vicente Sivera Catala
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What I meant it that before (years ago) blender didn't have a way of sculpting using a tablet. So you had to do everything with extrusions, polygon tweaking and stuff.

Back in time I learnt the basics and I modelled some simple stuff, attached you can see one of my crappy models :P



What caught my attention about zBrush is that even though you need 3D knowledge, you could do lots of stuff in a more intuitive way. So I'm glad to see that blender now incorporates lots of the "traditional" sculpting options.

I know this is hard work and I'm not expecting to get anywhere as good as you. I'm a 2D illustrator myself so already have lots of work to do everyday. This will be just some kind of hobby thing, lets see where it leads :)
 
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Francesco Pizzo
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Blender had sculpt mode around release 2.44, so about 8 years ago, before 3d printing exploded (company like GW used Free Form (expensive software and hardware) for modelling their metal moulds for plastic injection), Zbrush 2 was released one year before if I'm not wrong, Zbrush 1 was not a proper sculpting software but a 2.5 dimension paint/modelling software, pretty ignored by the industry.

I was a traditional sculptor, using green stuff and fimo, and start my digital modelling journey for opposite reason than you: I no good at all in drawing and painting, so want use 3d for creating some illustration, than 3d printing exploded and what I learned about 3d turn out useful for my job.

Agree about zbrush, but if you want really understood what you doing even in zbrush is better understood and study first traditional poly modelling software. The funny stuff is many old guard and all people starting study 3d with traditional software like maya or 3dsm think Zbrush is unintuitive and have a bad GUI
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