Bruce
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Chagrin Falls
Ohio
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Although I am a longtime gamer (wargames, Euros, RPGs, etc.), I am a complete newbie to sports games, and in particular to APBA Pro Baseball. My young son is showing interest in all things baseball, so I recently acquired a used copy of APBA with the 2009 MLB line-up. It will likely be a while before he is old enough to play, but it looks like fun and I'd like to learn it for my own sake!

I am a very casual baseball fan, and, in preparation for APBA, I've been self-teaching how to score a baseball game. The more I learn, the more fascinated I become, and the more I can see why baseball has such a passionate following.

The APBA basic rules are easy enough to follow. But my question is in regard to interpreting some of the roll results on the various charts (e.g., "Runner on Third Base", etc.). I tried to find explanations or descriptions on BGG and the Internet of the annotations/interpretations on those charts, and while I feel sure they are out there, I can't seem to find them. I'd be grateful to have someone point out a resource and/or explain a few examples below (or any others you think are sufficiently demonstrative -- the ones I've listed below have been picked semi-randomly). I think if I can get answers to a handful of examples, I'll be able to piece together the rest. I know (or at least I think I do!) what a lot of these annotations mean, but I'm especially confused by some of the alphanumeric indicators. Here are the examples:

Runner on Third Base - Fielding Two - 13:
"Strikeout; PO-C (R-Fly out; runner holds; PO-CF)"

Runner on Third Base - Fielding Two - 26:
"C-Runner out at home; batter to 2nd on rundown; A-2B A-C PO-3B
"D-Out at 1st; runner scores; A-2B PO-1B"

Runner on Third Base - Fielding One - 19:
"FC; runner escapes rundown on dropped throw; batter out at 2nd; runner remains on 3rd; A-3B A-C A-38 PO-2B; *E-3B runner scores"


I could give my own interpretation of the above, but I think that would only waste your time. Maybe this is just a baseball scoring thing, and if I had previously learned how to score baseball I would already know or be able to intuit these things easily! I could probably muddle through it, but I like to know what I am doing and get things right the first time.

Many thanks in advance to any who respond. And if anyone cares to offer any advice in learning and scoring the game, I'd be happy to hear!
 
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Todd Woodward
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Bowling Green
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Runner on Third Base - Fielding Two - 13:
"Strikeout; PO-C (R-Fly out; runner holds; PO-CF)"

Runner on Third Base - Fielding Two - 26:
"C-Runner out at home; batter to 2nd on rundown; A-2B A-C PO-3B
"D-Out at 1st; runner scores; A-2B PO-1B"

Runner on Third Base - Fielding One - 19:
"FC; runner escapes rundown on dropped throw; batter out at 2nd; runner remains on 3rd; A-3B A-C A-38 PO-2B; *E-3B runner scores"

PO- Put out
C- Close
D- Deep
A- Assist
E- Error
*- Fast Runner

Don't remember dealing with R.

Hope this helps!
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Stephen Roney
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twood1972 wrote:
Runner on Third Base - Fielding Two - 13:
"Strikeout; PO-C (R-Fly out; runner holds; PO-CF)"

Runner on Third Base - Fielding Two - 26:
"C-Runner out at home; batter to 2nd on rundown; A-2B A-C PO-3B
"D-Out at 1st; runner scores; A-2B PO-1B"

Runner on Third Base - Fielding One - 19:
"FC; runner escapes rundown on dropped throw; batter out at 2nd; runner remains on 3rd; A-3B A-C A-38 PO-2B; *E-3B runner scores"

PO- Put out
C- Close
D- Deep
A- Assist
E- Error
*- Fast Runner

Don't remember dealing with R.

Hope this helps!
No, the * indicates a different result when there are two outs at the start of the play.

R is a rating on pitchers which is fairly recent (as in within the last 20 years), which I believe is for low-strikeout pitchers. If the pitcher has the R rating, he turns that strikeout into a fly out.
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Bob Shurig
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Springfield
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I'm not sure if I remember correctly, but isn't (F) for fast runner and (S) for slow runner and (*) meaning the scoring (play) when there are 2 outs in the inning.
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Dick Butler
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First off, gamer99 is right about the asterisk; the * indicates the result when there are two outs in an inning.

More specifically, referring to this situation:

Runner on Third Base - Fielding Two - 13:
"Strikeout; PO-C (R-Fly out; runner holds; PO-CF)"

In APBA, a dice roll 13 is usually a strikeout. A person scoring the game would indicate this with a K next to the batter's name on his scoresheet.
Note: In baseball, the catcher gets credit for the putout(P.0.)when a pitcher strikes out a batter. Few fans are particular about who gets all the putouts unless they are keeping track of players' fielding averages for a full season.

The R in this case refers to a pitcher's individual rating. There are several different ones in APBA, more now than when I got my first APBA game back in the 60's. These ratings--currently K, R, W, X, Y, Z, and ZZ--sometimes change the normal result as indicated. Judging from the result above, an R pitcher is not one who normally strikes out a lot of batters, because in this situation an R pitcher allows a flyout to the center fielder instead, with the runner on 3rd holding instead of scoring. Instead of the K, a score keeper, of course, would indicate the result of that play with and F-8 on his scoresheet, or just an 8 circled.
Some scorers have other little additions, like putting an * next to a defensive play that was outstanding. A pf-2 could indicate a pop foul out to the catcher, while a p-4 might signal that the fly to the second baseman was a pop fly, not a line drive.

Keeping score is fun. I confess that I keep score playing APBA all the time, but not very often when I'm live at the ballpark.

Sorry about all the extra stuff I added above if you already know it. I'd have added even more if I had more time.

I'm happy for you that you have found APBA. It's a truly great baseball sim. It will give you and your son hours and hours of enjoyment and can teach him a lot about baseball and its great history.
 
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Dick Butler
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I forgot to add this: As soon as possible, familiarize yourself with individual fielding ratings and how to determine team fielding ratings. It will add immensely to your gaming.

Then, depending on your managing style, include the option of playing your infield in (C) or back (D) whenever appropriate. Become familiar, too, with individual base running ratings to guide whether you want to have your runner try for the extra base. And then there are outfielder throwing ratings. Or maybe, some of this is only in the Advanced version of APBA. I forget.

Whatever. You are in for a lot of APBA fun. Enjoy.
 
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Bruce
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Thanks to all of you for responding -- and so quickly! It is very helpful to me, both in learning how to score baseball and in deciphering the APBA results charts.

It is kind of funny. Until recently, I've spent most of my sports-watching time on football (usually college) and most of my sports-playing time on racquetball or golf. And although I've always loved watching baseball at the ballpark, I've rarely watched it on TV or listened to it on radio. But between APBA and the reading I've done over the last few weeks on baseball strategy and scoring baseball, I've developed far greater appreciation and enthusiasm for the game. In fact, I'm kind of kicking myself that I didn't do it earlier -- at least earlier this year! -- since I now have to wait all the way to spring before I can watch (or even just listen on radio to) a game unfold and try to score it. I really feel like I'll see the game through different eyes.

I had never given a second thought to cross-country running, but in recent years my two oldest daughters started to run cross-country, and I've come to really appreciate that sport, including its mental and physical subtleties. I think it's going to be that way with baseball, too.

Again, thanks for the replies!

But I do have one more APBA question. The game I bought was for the 2009 line-up. Can I use the rules/charts with that game to play with older teams, ranging back to the early years of baseball, or are changes that have occurred over the years (either in APBA or baseball itself) such that you would need a different set of rules/charts for different baseball eras?

Thanks!
 
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Stephen Roney
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nsc68 wrote:

But I do have one more APBA question. The game I bought was for the 2009 line-up. Can I use the rules/charts with that game to play with older teams, ranging back to the early years of baseball, or are changes that have occurred over the years (either in APBA or baseball itself) such that you would need a different set of rules/charts for different baseball eras?
The charts work for any year. The only issues are if you have older charts, they may not have all the ratings that have been added in later seasons. The reverse is not a problem. I only recently switched from using my 1970ish charts to newer ones in a league that is now up to the 1995 season.
 
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Bruce
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Thanks for the reply. Glad to know a modern set of rules is backwards compatible, since it opens up wide the seasons that are available for play.
 
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