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Hearthstone has a max of 2
Magic has a max 4

Mine, with the layout of the board the way it is, will allow 6. Do you feel this is too many in a sense, or that it doesn't really matter?
 
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Chris Stanton
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Without knowing anything about the game, it's difficult to say with any certainty.
Best guess however is that it really doesn't matter.
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Tim Davidson
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Card count limits is a TCG thing, which is a dead sales model in the real world (maybe not dead as a mobile app, particularly if licensed property). This type of game is best implemented as a Deck Building Game that can be sold as a single product. A DBG would give you more control over limiting a card pool.

Either way, a card limit is probably something that should be chosen much later in beta testing to address balancing problems you know exist.
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Steven Tu
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Depends on the game and sales model. When Netrunner first came I really appreciated its 3 per deck model as opposed to MTG's 4, and I've come to really appreciate Hearthstone's 2 per deck too, it makes it less money-grabby given the same mechanics.

6 sounds nuts unless all the cards come in at a low price point. Even then players have to contend with a massive bloated deck (unless your game goes for something like 5 different cards in a deck for a 30 card deck, which I just don't see working in terms of variety)
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Tom Pennifold
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Part of this decision will come down to how many cards in the deck itself, Hearthstone runs 2 of the same card in a 30 card deck, magic runs 4 of the same card in a 60 card deck.
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Steven Tu
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to1v1 wrote:
Part of this decision will come down to how many cards in the deck itself, Hearthstone runs 2 of the same card in a 30 card deck, magic runs 4 of the same card in a 60 card deck.


Also part of that consideration is that I'd much rather be shuffling 30 cards than 60 cards, though of course Hearthstone requires no real shuffling
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to1v1 wrote:
Part of this decision will come down to how many cards in the deck itself, Hearthstone runs 2 of the same card in a 30 card deck, magic runs 4 of the same card in a 60 card deck.


I'm thinking a 30 card deck limit should be plenty, but it isn't quite the same as how Magic/Hearthstone deals with drawing.
 
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Grace McDermott
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I'd need way more info before I could give you a real answer.

What size deck are you looking at for each player?
 
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Jim McCollum
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ForestDingo wrote:
to1v1 wrote:
Part of this decision will come down to how many cards in the deck itself, Hearthstone runs 2 of the same card in a 30 card deck, magic runs 4 of the same card in a 60 card deck.


I'm thinking a 30 card deck limit should be plenty, but it isn't quite the same as how Magic/Hearthstone deals with drawing.


The downside is that there is so little variety in the game. Of course, this is without knowing how your game works. When we were deciding this for Ameritocracy we playtested a bit at different amounts and then used this tool to calculate the probabilities given various conditions. We used the calculations to test our reactions from playtesting.

If you want to do some calculations, here are the important dimensions to consider.

Replacement or No?
Ameritocracy is like Magic, Hearthstone, Netrunner, etc. in that drawing cards is sampling without replacement. Replacement just refers to whether a card is put back into the population (the deck) after it is selected. For example, if you draw a card, execute the effect, and then shuffle it back into the deck to draw again, that is sampling with replacement. If you draw a card, add it to your hand, and then subsequently draw from the deck without adding the card you previously drew back, that is sampling without replacement. Why is this important? Because it changes the probability calculations. In the sampling with replacement scenario, the chance of drawing a given card from a 30 card deck with 6x of a given card is just 6/30 = 1/5. So for every 5 cards, you can expect to draw one of any particular unique cards. Most card games don't work this way because they don't use replacement. Without replacement, the calculations are more tricky. Fortunately, you don't have to do them by hand or with Excel, that website I shared above will do it for you.

So from here on out, I'm assuming you are sampling without replacement.

Population size
The population size is the total cards in the deck. If you expect most players will play with 30 cards, that is your population size.

Number of successes in population
This is the number of each unique card. In this case, you are proposing that players will play no more than 6 of a given card. Typically, in strategy card games with constructed decks, players will tend to play the minimum deck size and maximum copies of any one card.

Sample size
The sample size is the number of cards drawn. A good place to start might be the number of cards in the opening hand or available on turn 1. Let's just say in your game it's 4.

Number of successes in sample (x)
You are interested in the probability of drawing x copies of a given card. If x = 2, you are finding out the probability of drawing two of the same card. When x = 1, you are finding out the probability of drawing a particular card. Let's just set x = 1.

Cumulative Probability: P(X > 1)
I often think this is the most useful result to look at. This one is the probability of drawing at least x copies of the same card, but also account for drawing more. So if x = 1, this would tell you the probability of drawing one or more copies. In our set up here, it says the probability is about .61 or 61%. That means, in four cards, there is a 61% chance that you will have drawn any one unique card in the deck.

Just for comparison, if you were sampling with replacement, then you would have 4 chances at 1/5, so 4*1/5=80%.

How to use this information
This tool is useful for understanding the probabilities in your game, and how often a player will have access to a given card. One issue in games is replayability, and variation in the game can help with that. It can also be annoying to lose to "randomness", so there is some downside there too. FWIW, in both Magic and Hearthstone, the probability of drawing a given card in your opening hand is about 30-40%. Players will typically draw a fair number of cards in each game, so it might also be worthwhile to look at the number of cards accessible in later turns too, which you can do just by adjusting the sample size.

Hope that's helpful!
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Sturv Tafvherd
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Jim's method is the same thing I would do.

If I were to assume that when you say "minions" you mean that these are cards that you'd like to play on the very first turn, then you'd want a very high probability of drawing them into your hand on the first turn.

That said, you might have more than one kind of minion. So you're not necessarily limited to hoping to draw at least one of the six cards in the deck. If you had three different minion cards, then six copies of each is 18 cards in the deck.

Another way to figure it out is "How many minions do I want to have by turn X?" Meaning... given Y card draws, how many minions should have gone thru you hand?
 
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