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DC Comics Deck-Building Game: Teen Titans» Forums » General

Subject: Appropriate age for this game rss

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Scott Heenan
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I've got a six-year old who loves Teen Titans. I read a review of the original DC Deckbuilder from a guy and his kids, who were 4 and 7, were playing it with him. And the BGG page for it said ages 8 and up. The page for the Teen Titans version, however, is suggesting 15 and up.

For those of you who've played it, is there really that big of a gap between the two? Or would a kid who has picked up things like Forbidden Desert and Heroscape without much trouble be able to enjoy this?
 
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Paul Jefferies
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The original DC deckbuilder and the first expansion are pitched perfectly for what the game sets out to do...they are fun, fast, and entertaining. Teen Titans takes that formula and, for me, completely ruins it. Play time is doubled - they are TEEN titans after all so they their power is greatly reduced - game play is consequently frustrating and although they introduced an 'enduring' card effect...the cards are so weak as to be fairly useless. The jump in suggested playing age is probably to offset the difficulty of getting enough power to actually attack any of the supervillains; that and negotiating the enduring power cards. My two cents would be to skip the Teen Titans completely and get the original. My friend, whose copy we played...literally threw it away...it was that bad. And we both love the original.
 
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Benjamin Goertz
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oobydoob wrote:
The original DC deckbuilder and the first expansion are pitched perfectly for what the game sets out to do...they are fun, fast, and entertaining. Teen Titans takes that formula and, for me, completely ruins it. Play time is doubled - they are TEEN titans after all so they their power is greatly reduced - game play is consequently frustrating and although they introduced an 'enduring' card effect...the cards are so weak as to be fairly useless. The jump in suggested playing age is probably to offset the difficulty of getting enough power to actually attack any of the supervillains; that and negotiating the enduring power cards. My two cents would be to skip the Teen Titans completely and get the original. My friend, whose copy we played...literally threw it away...it was that bad. And we both love the original.


I think what Paul here is trying to say is that the strategy needed to be a successful player in Teen Titans is much more difficult that in the previous sets. There is definitely more "long-term" planning that has to be decided when choosing to use cards that are Ongoing in front of you. Compared to the first sets, you will need to really have turns planned out to be effective at taking down the Super-Villains and getting good power. There are no "super-combo" cards like Man of Steel in this set so younger children are not going to really get the same experience as a even slightly more experienced player. If your child has played the previous sets and seems to have a grasp of the idea of how to string combo's, they may be alright. If not, they may fall behind significantly and it may not be as fun for them. This is most likely why they bumped the recommended age up for this set. If you child is comfortable playing Forbidden Desert and Heroscape then I would say they could probably wrap their head around the expanded strategy involved with Teen Titans (assuming they have played a previous set or other deck-building game with proficiency).

Hope that helps.
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Max Maloney
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As a fan of this game, I can say confidently that the best standalone set is still the first one. It is a better balanced and designed set than any of the others.

I buy every release for the game, but I do this to combine them and make a custom deck. I haven't been very impressed with the experience of the standalone expansions when played as standalones. They aren't as well balanced and tend to lead to degenerate combo building.
 
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Scott Heenan
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BenJazz wrote:
oobydoob wrote:
The original DC deckbuilder and the first expansion are pitched perfectly for what the game sets out to do...they are fun, fast, and entertaining. Teen Titans takes that formula and, for me, completely ruins it. Play time is doubled - they are TEEN titans after all so they their power is greatly reduced - game play is consequently frustrating and although they introduced an 'enduring' card effect...the cards are so weak as to be fairly useless. The jump in suggested playing age is probably to offset the difficulty of getting enough power to actually attack any of the supervillains; that and negotiating the enduring power cards. My two cents would be to skip the Teen Titans completely and get the original. My friend, whose copy we played...literally threw it away...it was that bad. And we both love the original.


I think what Paul here is trying to say is that the strategy needed to be a successful player in Teen Titans is much more difficult that in the previous sets. There is definitely more "long-term" planning that has to be decided when choosing to use cards that are Ongoing in front of you. Compared to the first sets, you will need to really have turns planned out to be effective at taking down the Super-Villains and getting good power. There are no "super-combo" cards like Man of Steel in this set so younger children are not going to really get the same experience as a even slightly more experienced player. If your child has played the previous sets and seems to have a grasp of the idea of how to string combo's, they may be alright. If not, they may fall behind significantly and it may not be as fun for them. This is most likely why they bumped the recommended age up for this set. If you child is comfortable playing Forbidden Desert and Heroscape then I would say they could probably wrap their head around the expanded strategy involved with Teen Titans (assuming they have played a previous set or other deck-building game with proficiency).

Hope that helps.



That does help! He's not played any deck builders before, but was thinking that if I was going to start him on one that his love of the Teen Titans might help fuel interest. Given that he does like Batman, Superman, etc., I may lean towards the initial set, see how he takes to it, etc.

And, Paul, should you find yourself throwing anything else out, let us know
 
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John H
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Advocator wrote:
BenJazz wrote:
oobydoob wrote:
The original DC deckbuilder and the first expansion are pitched perfectly for what the game sets out to do...they are fun, fast, and entertaining. Teen Titans takes that formula and, for me, completely ruins it. Play time is doubled - they are TEEN titans after all so they their power is greatly reduced - game play is consequently frustrating and although they introduced an 'enduring' card effect...the cards are so weak as to be fairly useless. The jump in suggested playing age is probably to offset the difficulty of getting enough power to actually attack any of the supervillains; that and negotiating the enduring power cards. My two cents would be to skip the Teen Titans completely and get the original. My friend, whose copy we played...literally threw it away...it was that bad. And we both love the original.


I think what Paul here is trying to say is that the strategy needed to be a successful player in Teen Titans is much more difficult that in the previous sets. There is definitely more "long-term" planning that has to be decided when choosing to use cards that are Ongoing in front of you. Compared to the first sets, you will need to really have turns planned out to be effective at taking down the Super-Villains and getting good power. There are no "super-combo" cards like Man of Steel in this set so younger children are not going to really get the same experience as a even slightly more experienced player. If your child has played the previous sets and seems to have a grasp of the idea of how to string combo's, they may be alright. If not, they may fall behind significantly and it may not be as fun for them. This is most likely why they bumped the recommended age up for this set. If you child is comfortable playing Forbidden Desert and Heroscape then I would say they could probably wrap their head around the expanded strategy involved with Teen Titans (assuming they have played a previous set or other deck-building game with proficiency).

Hope that helps.



That does help! He's not played any deck builders before, but was thinking that if I was going to start him on one that his love of the Teen Titans might help fuel interest. Given that he does like Batman, Superman, etc., I may lean towards the initial set, see how he takes to it, etc.


That is a great plan. My 7 year old son picked up the original base set with no problems whatsoever. Heroes Unite base set was no issue either, as no new mechanics were introduced.

We just started playing Teen Titans, and it is true the games run a bit longer in real time. Not really because the superheroes are weaker as someone claimed, but because there is more info to parse during a turn to determine your best plays. (I have found chaining the ongoing cards right actually makes the Teen Titans just as powerful, if not moreso than the superheroes in the previous sets.)

In the previous two sets, the order in which you played cards was usually not very important, if at all. The order you play cards is crucial in Teen Titans. And instead of having just your 5 hand cards to decide about, there will be several ongoing cards in your control most turns as the game progresses.

Those ongoing cards usually offer a choice between leaving them out in front of you as ongoing cards which gives some heroes and powers benefits, or discarding them to get a one time effect or boost of power. This requires some thought. Some cards have complex powers too. For example, the Beast Boy Superhero power involves a bit of thought and discard pile checking to see if you could pull it off and if you'd want to. The Cadmus Labs location lets you play a low-powered hero or villain twice in 1 turn, resolving his/her card effects twice. In other words, there is a lot more to process each turn. This is great in increasing player options. This is not ideal for playing with younger kids or for keeping play times in a tight window.

My son is handling Teen Titans fine after having played a lot of the 1st two base sets. It's just tougher to get a game in before his bedtime, and the game runs a lot slower for him because of the added mental overhead. It was very valid to bump up the suggested age on this one. He still loves it though, and we create great narratives each game.

I would definitely start with the well-balanced original base set with the most iconic characters. If he can handle that and likes it, he can play Heroes United, and then play other sets as he grows older if the interest is still there. My son absolutely loves the game; he was hooked from the first game playing as Superman.

One added bonus of this game is you can set your child up with the more straightforward (and perceived "stronger") superheroes while you play the trickier to use superheroes. It puts the game on a more even footing without you having to help your kid's cause. I play him straight, and he beats me fair and square sometimes. Some games we help each other out a bit by allowing each other to get the cards that help our respective powers the most, and some games we are doing our best to steal each other's most desired cards from the lineup. We always have fun. Hope you have fun playing with your son, too.
 
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