Lee Saunders
United States
Syracuse
Nebraska
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I am working on creating some interesting wall mounted versions of games in closable cabinets similar to those nice dartboard cabinets.

I thought I would start with Risk then move on to Axis and Allies. I have a full workshop including a CNC mill so I can create something professional looking. I've even cut some test playing pieces for Axis and Allies out of wood (A&A meeples anyone?). They look fantastic and it will be very easy to add rare earth magnets to them so they will stick to the game board.

My question to the group is. Would it be better to find either, images of the game board and get a poster printing company to print out a copy or separate the printed map of a real game from the cardboard and mount that on the metal.

I've successfully removed printed images from the chipboard of games before so that is not an issue. My issue is that unless I mount the board differently than I was thinking (50% of board in the center back of the cabinet where a dartboard would mount in a dartboard cabinet. and 25% of the map on each wing.), this folds the board differently than it is on the cardboard so the old fold wrinkles will be visible.

What I foresee with this cabinet is the ability to play games, store the pieces and keep in-process games safe by simply closing the cabinet. I would love to create cabinets like this for a large variety of games like: Risk, Axis and Allies, the Crayon Rails games etc.

So, any ideas, opinions or suggestions?
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Brian
United States
Nassau County
New York
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saunderl wrote:
I am working on creating some interesting wall mounted versions of games in closable cabinets similar to those nice dartboard cabinets.

I thought I would start with Risk then move on to Axis and Allies. I have a full workshop including a CNC mill so I can create something professional looking. I've even cut some test playing pieces for Axis and Allies out of wood (A&A meeples anyone?). They look fantastic and it will be very easy to add rare earth magnets to them so they will stick to the game board.

My question to the group is. Would it be better to find either, images of the game board and get a poster printing company to print out a copy or separate the printed map of a real game from the cardboard and mount that on the metal.

I've successfully removed printed images from the chipboard of games before so that is not an issue. My issue is that unless I mount the board differently than I was thinking (50% of board in the center back of the cabinet where a dartboard would mount in a dartboard cabinet. and 25% of the map on each wing.), this folds the board differently than it is on the cardboard so the old fold wrinkles will be visible.

What I foresee with this cabinet is the ability to play games, store the pieces and keep in-process games safe by simply closing the cabinet. I would love to create cabinets like this for a large variety of games like: Risk, Axis and Allies, the Crayon Rails games etc.

So, any ideas, opinions or suggestions?
I don't fully understand the purpose or benefit of doing this.

If you simply want to be able to store a game in progress, wouldn't it be better to build a storage area for the game to remain? Either by having it on in a vaulted table or played on a frame which could be moved into a large drawer?

With your idea, each game need to be reconstructed instead of having one storage system which is compatible with any game. When you fold the game closed, how many hinges are there? Will you need to leave enough height for double meeples so they don't collide? Will having magnetted meeples cause problems if they attract each other? Will the meeples which are within one meeple height of the hinge strike each other? Are you making this out of steel thick enough to recess the hinge so the metal board lays flat on the table? How heavy will it be?
 
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Lee Saunders
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Syracuse
Nebraska
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And since I wrote the question originally, all confusion is completely my fault.

The cabinet would be part game room décor, part artwork and part working game.

When our lives calm down a bit, I'll be finishing our basement and building a nice gaming table. Until then I do not want a gaming table that I'll just have to store, but I'll would like to work on something that will eventually be in my game room and art/décor is a nice small project that I can work on then store with minimal space required.

As for hinges I was actually thinking of building the board recessed similar to a backgammon board. Backgammon sets are hinged simply but there is a depth to the play area. Dartboard cabinets have quite a bit of depth to them as well. Plus with this design, the doors can be opened all the way and the board then would appear flat.

But, I am not married to this design. I want to work on the plans this winter and start cutting material in the spring.

 
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PJ Cunningham
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Greenfield
Ohio
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I think its a fantastic idea. Not only does it save space in your gaming area, but it could also be used to play long-term games between players with odd schedules; a player would take their turn whenever convenient for them, and maybe leaves a note on a dry erase board for the next player, then goes about their business until the next time/day its their turn.

Instead of making multiple cabinets, have you considered making just one cabinet with removable boards inside? That way you could have lots of game options without having to make multiple cabinets.

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Lee Saunders
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Syracuse
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ironregime wrote:
I think its a fantastic idea. Not only does it save space in your gaming area, but it could also be used to play long-term games between players with odd schedules; a player would take their turn whenever convenient for them, and maybe leaves a note on a dry erase board for the next player, then goes about their business until the next time/day its their turn.

Instead of making multiple cabinets, have you considered making just one cabinet with removable boards inside? That way you could have lots of game options without having to make multiple cabinets.
Wow... Just wow. That's what I get for having blinders on. Looking so hard at the trees, I didn't see the forest. etc, etc.

Making the board changeable is a great idea. And like I said before, I was not married to my original design.

Still, would reusing the art from a real board or having new art printed be better? One does not involve copyright, but the other does so I would have to either dip into the dark side or find alternate board artwork for every game.
 
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Sam Phillips Beckerman
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Austin
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I'm not sure if that would entail copyright issues. It would not be for resale and you have purchased the game.

When you said it was for game room decor, I assumed the boards of the games would show and there might be a little drawer under each with the bits. So they would look like the old telephone cubbies. And then you wouldn't want to make the maps interchangeable because they were decorative.
 
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PJ Cunningham
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saunderl wrote:
would reusing the art from a real board or having new art printed be better?
From an aesthetic standpoint, original game boards look cool and have maximum nostalgia factor.

However, from a design standpoint, new art allows you to best maximize the available space. Gameboards are all different sizes, and if you want to standardize them to fit your cabinet, you'll need to be able to change the dimensions, maybe reposition some of it, move reference charts around, etc.

If I were doing it, I think I'd base the size of the cabinet on my absolute favorite game board, and use an actual copy of it. Then later on I'd consider making additional boards, and would probably end up using new art for those.
 
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B C Z
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Reston
Virginia
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Both Risk and Axis and Allies have many pieces on the board and additional components, like dice or cards to have to worry about. That might get in the way of a vertical play and storage solution.

I don't know if the game is in your repertoire, but in college I created a vertically mounted cork board for Diplomacy. Armies were one kind of pin shape (ball on stick) and Fleets were another (traditional pegboard pin). This allowed easy tracking of long running play by email games on the wall near the computer desk.

It had the added ambiance of looking like old-timey war maps where front locations were literally represented with pins in a cork board.

Making this magnetic with two different shaped small magnets (cut out of those 'turn your business card into a fridge magnet' stickers) isn't a big leap.
 
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