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Subject: San Juan - Review rss

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Greg Schloesser
United States
Jefferson City
TN
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Design by Andreas Seyfarth
Published by Alea / Ravensburger
2 - 4 Players, 45 minutes - 1 hour
Review by Greg J. Schloesser


Puerto Rico by award-winning designer Andreas Seyfarth is widely recognized as one of the best boardgames ever designed. It has won numerous industry and hobby awards, and has sold millions of copies worldwide. For years it was rated as the top game on the Boardgame Geek, the hobby's premier boardgame website. Mechanisms within the game have been borrowed / copied by numerous other designers, and the game continues to influence game design to this day.

It was no surprise that a card game version of the game was released shortly after the boardgame's success. San Juan also proved quite popular, capturing the feel of the boardgame in a card game format. Sadly, it was out of print for many years, but has recently been republished by Ravensburger under their Alea label. This new version incorporates the "New Buildings" expansion as well as one brand new building. Other than these additions, as well as a slightly larger box and new cover artwork, the game remains the same.

In an effort to become San Juan's most profitable citizen, players will acquire production buildings and use the resources produced to purchase more valuable buildings. Many buildings supply special powers, enhancing one's efforts to achieve wealth and prosperity. The game ends when one player constructs his 12th building, and the player amassing the most valuable buildings emerges as San Juan's wealthiest citizen and wins the game.

As with Puerto Rico, the central mechanism is choosing roles. In turn order, each player selects one of the available roles and performs the action and privilege that role conveys. All opponents also get to perform the action, but not the special privilege, which is reserved solely for the player selecting the role. Each role may only be selected once per turn. The roles are:

Builder. Each player may construct a building, playing a card from their hand and paying the required cost as indicated on the building. Cards also serve as currency, so the cost is paid by discarding the required number of cards from one's hand. The player selecting this role gets a one-card discount when constructing.

Producer. One production building owned by each player produces a resource. This is done by drawing a card from the deck and placing it face-down below the building. The player taking this role is rewarded by having a second production building produce. Production buildings are the same as in Puerto Rico: indigo, sugar, tobacco, coffee and silver, with silver being the most valuable. Each production building can only hold one resource, so it is wise to sell these resources often.
Trader. Speaking of selling, this is the role that accomplishes that task. The top trading house tile--which lists the selling prices for each type of good--is revealed. Each player may then sell one good, with the player selecting this role selling two. Payment is made in the form of cards, which are taken into the players' hands.

Players do not know the actual selling price--which varies slightly with each tile--until someone selects this role. This does add a dose of luck / uncertainty to the proceedings, but since the prices don't vary wildly, it isn't too much of a concern. Players who have been mindful of past tiles may want to decline to sell, waiting for a more profitable selling price to arise.

Councilor. The player who selects this role draws five card from the deck and keeps one. All other players draw only two cards, keeping one.

Prospector. This is the only role wherein only the active player derives a benefit, which is the taking of one card from the deck.

Once all players have selected a role, a new round is conducted, with all five roles once again being available to select. Players must discard down to 7 cards, so card hoarding is not an option. This process continues until one or more players construct their 12th building, at which point victory points are tallied to determine the victor. With four players, the game usually lasts about 45 minutes or so.

San Juan is significantly less complex and plays quicker than its progenitor Puerto Rico. This is by design and makes it more accessible to folks new to gaming. It does take awhile for folks to get accustomed to the fact that cards are used for both building one's city as well as for currency, a concept that has perplexed several folks to whom I've taught the game. Once that minor hurdle is surpassed, however, the game is easily learned, allowing folks to quickly understand and enjoy it.

There are some interesting decisions to be made. These primarily center around the choosing of offices and deciding which buildings to construct and which cards to use in their construction. Buildings that convey the best benefits and most victory points are expensive to construct, so it will usually take numerous turns to accumulate the cards to pay these costs. Since a player can only hold seven cards at the end of a turn, accumulating enough cards to pay for expensive buildings must be accomplished during the turn, with these cards being expended before players are forced to discard cards.

There is a wide variety of different buildings providing various benefits and rewards. It is wise to construct buildings whose powers are complementary, as this often enhances a player's abilities and options. The new buildings now contained in the base set add even more abilities and options and are a welcome addition.

It is important to note that San Juan is essentially a solitary affair, with little interaction amongst the players. There is not much a player can do to directly affect his opponents. Some folks do not enjoy games that have this "solitaire" feel, but I generally don't mind, particularly if the game isn't one of great duration. San Juan's 45 minute time frame helps overcome any hesitancy due to this solitaire nature.

It seems inevitable that a popular board game is sure to spawn a card and perhaps even a dice version. Most of these versions don't measure-up to the original and have a very short shelf life. While there is no denying that Puerto Rico is a masterpiece that would be virtually impossible to equal in a card game version, San Juan does succeed in capturing much of the flavor, and even uses the central "role" mechanism to great effect. It is well suited to introduce folks to European-style gaming, and has enough present to keep gamers interested and challenged. It is one of the better card adaptations of a popular board game.
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John Burt
United States
Portland
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When played well, there can actually be quite a bit of interaction, though it is more subtle than standard "take that" mechanisms. For example, you can choose a role that will deny your opponent the privilege that you know they need, or build relentlessly to deny them the ability to lay down expensive buildings or get a production engine going.

One of the most pleasing aspects of San Juan is that it has a long and gentle learning curve and just gets deeper the more you play, but simultaneously it is fun to play at any level.

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Wayne Walker
United States
Chuluota
Florida
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quill65 wrote:
When played well, there can actually be quite a bit of interaction, though it is more subtle than standard "take that" mechanisms. For example, you can choose a role that will deny your opponent the privilege that you know they need, or build relentlessly to deny them the ability to lay down expensive buildings or get a production engine going.

One of the most pleasing aspects of San Juan is that it has a long and gentle learning curve and just gets deeper the more you play, but simultaneously it is fun to play at any level.



I came here to say this, but quill65 said it so much better. The times have played with people (vs. AIs on the iPhone) I have experienced plenty of interaction. If you are on your game, every role selection will tick somebody off. It is glorious!
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Reno Thompson
United States
Louisville
Kentucky
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WE LIKED SJ, but noticed that whoever got the Library card in play the quickest seemed to win more often then not. Has anybody else felt this way???
 
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David Barlowe
United States
Clarks Summit
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Library is indeed strong, but can trap you if not built at the right time.

Original San Juan, the Guild Hall is so OP it warps the entire game around production strategies.

The new rule for it (1 pt. for each production building, +1 for each type of production building) seems strong but perhaps not as OP.
 
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Ivan J
United Kingdom
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Got to agree, changing the scoring of Guild Hall is the best change to the balance of the new game.

What made it OP in the orig game, was any indigo suddenly became effectively worth 3 points! Meaning you could be scoring well and keep cards. Scoring 16+ pts with it was not uncommon.

If I ever got the guild hall early, I'd just sit on it. Build any production building, happy knowing I'd win the vast majority of games. When combined with smithy it was impossible to stop.

The new scoring also encourages you to buy sugar/coffee, something that wouldn't usually be first choice for efficient scoring with guild hall.
 
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