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Subject: Introductory Wargame, high random element rss

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Bruce Baskir
United States
Missouri
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Overview: Conflict is an introductory wargame that can give newcomers to the genre a rough idea about tactical planning, but isn’t heavy enough to drive them off.
Components: Fold-in-the-middle Parker Brothers board with corner home bases, and either brown (land) or blue (water) squares. Pieces are painted metal – you will recognize the ships and artillery pieces from Monopoly, but also included are cannon, and airplanes that look like they were designed for a 1930’s science fiction movie.
Set-up: Each player has a base in one corner of the board where most of his pieces begin play. In the center of the board is a reserve, where additional pieces are placed.
Game Play: During your turn you roll two dice and move one piece the number of spaces on one die, and another piece the number of spaces on the other die. Land units must stay on land spaces, water units must stay on water spaces, and airplanes may fly over either. Diagonal movement allows both land and water pieces to move past the bridges that connect the outer land area to an inner island. If you roll doubles, you get to roll again, but three doubles ends your turn and forces you to put a piece back into your reserve. If you roll a seven, you may take a piece out of the reserve and put it into your home base. With some minor exceptions, you capture an opponent’s piece by moving on top of or through the square where it sits. You defeat an opponent by landing a piece by exact count onto his starting space – this action not only removes him from the game, but returns to you any pieces he may have captured.
Rating: The rules are simple, but the outcome of the game is heavily influenced by the roll-and-move mechanics. Games usually involve lines of pieces facing off against each other seven spaces apart, with the first person to roll doubles winning the battle. The board is symmetric and uninspired. Not a bad introductory game, but likely to be ridiculed by any serious grognard. Could perhaps be modified to acceptability by coming up with a more inventive map, and developing a better movement system (possibly drawing cards into a hand instead of rolling dice and playing any two?) Overall I rate it a five, but I’m being generous because I like the pieces.
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Ronald Pehr
United States
Las Vegas
Nevada
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Good review. Should point out that this game is not new, it was designed more than 45 years ago and was intended for children (Which is what I was when I played it then)
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Jim Sandefur
United States
Lizella
Georgia
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To mitigate the luck a little we use the following House Rules: (1) Rolling doubles does not give you another roll but lets you add 1 to each die. (2) Every time you roll a one you use it and then roll that die again.

This gets rid of the over-the-top luck of rolling doubles and the disaster of rolling a one.
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Roger Hobden
Canada
Montreal
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I played this game lot when I was a child.

Then I got Waterloo, and nothing was ever the same after that.
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