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Subject: Miniature painting for Christmas. rss

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Mara Feldmane
Latvia
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Hello, cool board game people.cool

I desperately need your help and opinion.

Since Christmas is coming to town faster then I would like it, I wanted to surprise my husband with miniature paining kit since he has gotten curious enough to actually want to paint. I have been reading posts and comments on different pains but there are so many types (base, layer, dry and so on) and brands (Vallejo, Citadel, Reaper) that I got confused.

I want those paints to last longer on the miniatures and in the bottles. I don't know which brushes would be best, if it even matters, and what colors to get. Mostly I'm confused about types, what are they used for, and brands.

As you can notice I'm not a board game expert and about miniature paining I know even less.

I hope my request is resonable and I you can help me, otherwise my husband is getting socks for christmas.shake

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You'll get people saying Citadel, Vallejo, and Reaper. They will try to state their case as to why one is better but it really doesn't matter. They are all fantastic and you can't go wrong with any of those three. Actually, I'm sure I'm leaving out some other good brands.

Here is your buying list:

Paint Sets:

http://www.miniaturemarket.com/rpr9961.html
http://www.miniaturemarket.com/rpr9962.html

You'll see lots of sets but I find that these ones are probably the best deal. Most sets seem to be the same price as if you ordered the bottles individually, or sometimes (like Vallejo sets), even more! But you don't have to buy sets. You can just pick whatever brand you like and choose the colours yourself! When I just started I bought three of each colour in shades I liked. It's paint, so you can get any colour you want with just a few colours anyway!

Primer:

You can go to any department store and pick up some primer. Just make sure it's for plastic and it's matte. That's it. I like black primer and the Krylon brand.

Brushes:

He's just starting, so he doesn't need crazy fancy brushes. Go to Michaels or wherever, you can even just order them on Miniature Market. Get a 0 size brush and a 2 size brush. Like this: http://www.miniaturemarket.com/catalog/product/view/id/12173...

Sealer:

You'll need a sealer when you're finished painting. This will keep everything sealed and prevent chipping. You can get a gloss can from Krylon and then you give a spray of Testors Dull. Both of these can be found at department stores or craft stores.

Wet pallet:

http://www.miniaturemarket.com/catalog/product/view/id/21247...

This is a must. It keeps the paints from drying out. It doesn't have to be the one. That's just an example. Don't buy their pads. You can just use parchment paper!

That's mostly everything you need! You can find deals by doing quick searches online, or you can just buy them all in the same place like a hobby store. Package it all up in a nice big box and you have yourself a fantastic starter kit!


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M.C.Crispy
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Are there any suppliers of Reaper paint sets in Europe?
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Jake Staines
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To add to Mike's sound advice:

broken clock wrote:
You'll get people saying Citadel, Vallejo, and Reaper. They will try to state their case as to why one is better but it really doesn't matter. They are all fantastic and you can't go wrong with any of those three.


While I agree with the sentiment, I would add a warning. Each of those manufacturers has more than one range of paints - Citadel has some intended for basecoating (they used to be called 'foundation' but they changed a little while ago) and some for regular painting. Reaper has 'HD' which are a bit like the citadel basecoat paints - more pigment. Vallejo has 'Game Colour' (which are pre-thinned for brush painting and mimic GW's Citadel colour range), 'Model Colour' (which are more 'realistic' colours and have a higher pigment density) and 'Air Colour' (which are thinned for airbrush use - whatever you do don't buy these ones unless you have an airbrush!). Generally you want a couple of paints in the base-coat/high-pigment range for easy and patch-free basecoating, and then the majority of colours in the regular range for all the highlighting, shading, detail and so on.

Also, I use Vallejo exclusively and love them to bits, but they can be a pain to shake (to ensure they haven't separated) before using. If you get Vallejo paints, also buy some small ball-bearings and drop one in each pot to help it mix. IIRC Reaper include a little skull in each pot for this reason, while Citadel paints are a different shape and don't have so much of a problem anyway.


Primer:



When picking primer, be aware that you will have trouble getting bright colours over a black primer, and you'll have trouble creating a moody look over a white primer. I use mid-grey for a realistic look, but it's really down to the painter's preference.

broken clock wrote:

Brushes:

He's just starting, so he doesn't need crazy fancy brushes. Go to Michaels or wherever, you can even just order them on Miniature Market.


Again, I agree with the advice but I would add a warning. Bad brushes make painting miniatures extra-hard, so it's really worth making sure that you get decent brushes. Pros often use kolinsky sable, which is made from the hair of the Siberian Weasel and is super-expensive - but you don't have to go that far. I really like synthetic bristles, and find them to usually be a good compromise between quality and price. Plus they often have fancy white bristles!

What you do need to do is make sure before you buy a brush that the bristles all meet in a neat point and don't splay out in different directions. Be aware that brushes often come with a bit of wax on the bristles to make them look good, and this can potentially hide problems. Good shops will let you get some water, moisten the brush and make sure it still forms a point; the other shops don't deserve your money. A brush that doesn't form a nice point is more or less useless for miniature painting, especially at the beginner level.

Sealer:


Specifically, gloss sealer/varnish/lacquer is the only one that will actually protect your paint job. It's worth spraying with gloss even if you don't want a glossy finish, you can always knock it back with a matt varnish afterwards.

Wet pallet:


You can easily make your own wet palette with a plastic container, a rectangle of sponge-sloth that fits in the base of that container, and a sheet of baking parchment. Dampen the sponge, place it in the container and place the parchment over the top of it; mix and thin your paint on the surface of the parchment, and moisture will wick through from the sponge on the other side and keep the paint fresh for longer. There's no need to buy a dedicated wet palette at all!
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Douglas MacIntyre
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mccrispy wrote:
Are there any suppliers of Reaper paint sets in Europe?


http://miniature-heroes.co.uk/ may be worth a look - tends to order both minis and paints form reaper for uk distribution.
 
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Craig H
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Two random thoughts...

If you have a FLGS that sells paint, maybe consider getting that brand's starter set. Personally, I would prefer to add colours of the same brand when it comes time to "expand the collection".

One other thing to consider is that it appears that many online tutorials use Citadel paints so you may want to consider them strictly for a familiarity aspect.

Maybe the best thing to do is to buy a small starter set in any brand - that way if it turns out he doesn't like painting (I've heard there are people like that...) it's not a lot of money wasted and if he likes it but decides that another type of paint is the way to go, well, again, not a lot of money wasted.

I guess that is three thoughts...
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Tomáš Sládek
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Bichatse wrote:


Specifically, gloss sealer/varnish/lacquer is the only one that will actually protect your paint job. It's worth spraying with gloss even if you don't want a glossy finish, you can always knock it back with a matt varnish afterwards.


Curious, what are matte varnishes for then? Dullcoat, Vallejo matte varnish etc...
 
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Borghal wrote:
Bichatse wrote:


Specifically, gloss sealer/varnish/lacquer is the only one that will actually protect your paint job. It's worth spraying with gloss even if you don't want a glossy finish, you can always knock it back with a matt varnish afterwards.


Curious, what are matte varnishes for then? Dullcoat, Vallejo matte varnish etc...


Removing the shine from the glossy varnish.

Step 1) Use Krylon gloss varnish
Step 2) Wait 24 hours to dry
Step 3) Use Dullcoat

But let's keep this shit simple. Providing a bunch of information on the materials of brushes and the benefits of certain prime colours is a bit much for someone who just said they are feeling overwhelmed.


 
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Mark Blasco

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How much money do you want to spend? There will be differences in suggestions if you want to spend $40, or $100, or $250.

My biggest suggestion would be to make sure you get:

A primer (it doesn't have to be anything fancy, but you will want to prime things before you paint them

A few different brushes (size 0, 1, and 2 would be a good start, but I found the size 1 to be the best when I was starting out)

A set of paints that contains at least the basic colors. I prefer vallejo, because the citadel jars bug me, but if you have a local game/hobby store that sells model paints, go with whatever brand they carry, so it's easy to pick up more without having to order them every time.

A wash (type of paint) in black (this helps to define things). If you can get more than one, a brown wash will compliment this, followed by other colors.

Some sort of pallet. Many painters like the wet pallets, but for starting out, a little one with the small indents is good for starting.

This should be enough to go from a blank miniature to a painted one. You'll then need to varnish them to protect them. Some sort of spray gloss varnish, followed by a spray matte varnish, will protect the figures so the paint doesn't just chip.

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Ian Bennetts
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markblasco wrote:
HI prefer vallejo, because the citadel jars bug me...


Agree 100%, I have a mix of Vallejo and Citadel pots, the vallejo ones are easier to organise and don't get messy.

 
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Joke Meister
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If your husband is new to painting, I would also recommend not buying everything for him piecemeal but instead, go for one of the starter sets. There are lots of options and they tend to have most of what you need to get started - including models, paint, brushes etc. You don't even need to bother with a wet palette until you (or rather, your husband) get more serious about painting.

I personally use Reaper paints and they have a learn to paint kit that is pretty good value - https://www.reapermini.com/OnlineStore/Learn%20To%20Paint%20...

With that said, there are lots of alternatives so feel free to shop around and find one that works for you.
 
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Mark Raciborski
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For brushes
http://www.thebrushguys.com

Our local Michaels has a lot of crap, people ruin the tips, they get crammed back into the display every which way. You have to hunt for a good one.

Worst, some brushes have something like a cornstarch substance in the bristles to protect the tips. I seen some brushes that people have bent the crap out of, guess they don't know you need to wash that out with warm water.
 
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