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Subject: Eindhoven glider video rss

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Jim Bourke
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Just came upon this video in an aviation forum I frequent and thought it might be interesting to people here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfYSmGl8io8

Jim
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Pete Belli
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Pete Belli
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Chris Strabala
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Very cool footage! Thanks for posting!
 
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Edward Kendrick
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Extraordinary! You'd have thought the towing plane (Dakota?) would stall when the tow tautened - even though it was evidently elastic to some extent.

What would Health & Safety say?
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Will Marrero
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How do the land back in England? I assume they have a pilot in the glider? Hopefully hiding in the back just in case that snap back happens.
 
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Kevin
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Hard to explain but the tow rope in the C-47 was wound around a drum. As that rope started to pull out after it snags the glider tow rope, the drum rotates and the is a centrifugal brake that will start to slow the drum down. This allows the glider's tow rope to slow down and gently tighten. Eventually the rope it taut and the glider is moving and on it's way.

Yes, the rope also has some "stretch" or elasticity and that helps too.
The glider has a pilot so that scene where to tow rope breaks and snaps back into the glider most likely meant a pilot that was injured. Or had the crap scared out of him!

This method of flying over and snagging the glider tow rope was practiced stateside so it was a known risk. Most gliders were not retrieved this way. Rather the tow plane landed, they hooked up the glider tow rope and hauled it out, just like the first part shows in the film.

Also note one of the gliders early in the film segment has a Griswold nose. It's the odd looking "nose" sticking out the front of the glider. The glider nose was a weak point and if it impacted a tree, or stone wall or some other obstruction it most likely would cave in, killing or seriously injuring the pilot and co-pilot. Seeking a solution the Griswold nose was a steel girder device that comes to a point out in front of the glider nose. This way the glider would get deflected away from whatever it hit thereby protecting the nose of the glider.

I had the privilege of meeting a number of Glider Riders over the years and they were really amazing guys! Contrary to popular opinion CG-4a gliders were not death traps and the pilots were not "wash-outs" from regular pilot training. Indeed many were quite accomplished pilots who trained quite a bit to fly gliders into combat.
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Jim F
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Barbarossa wrote:

Extraordinary! You'd have thought the towing plane (Dakota?) would stall when the tow tautened - even though it was evidently elastic to some extent.

What would Health & Safety say?


Health and safety would say don't use gliders to transport troops in to battle full stop. Can you imagine present day combat troops agreeing to get in to one of those things and landing in them under enemy fire?
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Eddy Sterckx
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Ashiefan wrote:
Can you imagine present day combat troops agreeing to get in to one of those things and landing in them under enemy fire?


Maybe in 50 years time people will say the same thing about Black Hawk choppers.
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Edward Kendrick
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Ashiefan wrote:

Health and safety would say don't use gliders to transport troops in to battle full stop. Can you imagine present day combat troops agreeing to get in to one of those things and landing in them under enemy fire?


Come the revolution the H&S will be the first up against the wall ...
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武士に二言無し
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I can not imagine the real acceleration in the second method of towing! Hurk! gulp
We use, with sports-gliders/sailplanes, the traditional system: glider-----towing plane or with a winch, both more "soft" than those.
I've always thought that glider's pilots in WWII were super-men: months of training, responsibility of life of a bunch of men, some minutes of gliding flight and ONE single occasion to land "safely"!
From Eben-Emael to Op. Varsity, their history and use has always fascinated me, so much that at eighteen I was already an happy owner of a sailplane flight license.
Thanks Jim for sharing the video.

F.
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Edward Pundyk
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Barbarossa wrote:
Ashiefan wrote:

Health and safety would say don't use gliders to transport troops in to battle full stop. Can you imagine present day combat troops agreeing to get in to one of those things and landing in them under enemy fire?


Come the revolution the H&S will be the first up against the wall ...


I think you mean counter-revolution.
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Edward Kendrick
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fightinlegalist1 wrote:
Barbarossa wrote:
Ashiefan wrote:

Health and safety would say don't use gliders to transport troops in to battle full stop. Can you imagine present day combat troops agreeing to get in to one of those things and landing in them under enemy fire?


Come the revolution the H&S will be the first up against the wall ...


I think you mean counter-revolution.


Well we've already had the hex revolution.
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Leo Zappa
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When I read stories about WW2 gliders I'm always reminded of the unusual death of William Becker, the mayor of St. Louis, during World War Two. The mayor was a guest passenger on board a Waco glider in 1943 when the wing came off as the glider pilot hit the release lever...









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Kevin
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Ashiefan wrote:
Barbarossa wrote:

Extraordinary! You'd have thought the towing plane (Dakota?) would stall when the tow tautened - even though it was evidently elastic to some extent.

What would Health & Safety say?


Health and safety would say don't use gliders to transport troops in to battle full stop. Can you imagine present day combat troops agreeing to get in to one of those things and landing in them under enemy fire?


Well the main idea of gliders is to get behind the enemy lines and have a large body of troops ready and able to get into battle quickly. This versus paratroopers which also were dropped behind the lines but could (and did) get badly scattered. It would then take sometimes hours to get enough men assembled to create a battle ready force. Gliders were a valid attempt to avoid this issue and they proved to be well worth while.

While at times they came under fire whilst on their way to the landing zones, the landings themselves were pretty uneventful as far as enemy fire. Landing behind the lines meant landing in open areas where the enemy was not, then moving to a strategic location to secure a bridge, crossroads, key elevations, etc etc.

Despite popular opinion gliders for the most part were not death traps, as previously mentioned. Not every glider had a perfect landing of course, there were casualties to be sure. Yet the vast majority of glider landings were fine and the troops were unharmed. (The German experience with gliders on Crete where they landed on very rough ground naturally meant much higher casualties vs open fields that were relatively flat. The lesson they learned turned them away from using gliders for troop landings yet it wasn't the gliders that were the issue, it was the terrain they landed on...)

As an aside, the CG-4A gliders ended up being the 4th most produced aircraft for the U.S. in WW2 with 13,909 being built by the end of the war. Here in Mchigan where I live we had two producers of them, Ford which built 4190 and the Gibson Refridgeration company which built 1087.
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Tommy Hill
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Wonder what happened to the pilot on the glider smashed by the pick up. Bet he s*&t a brick.
 
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CJ
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eddy_sterckx wrote:
Ashiefan wrote:
Can you imagine present day combat troops agreeing to get in to one of those things and landing in them under enemy fire?


Maybe in 50 years time people will say the same thing about Black Hawk choppers.


Quite.
 
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Lance G
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Good video, thanks for posting.
 
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