Born To Lose, Live To Win
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I am planning on remounting my King of The Tabletop onto wood. I am also planning on printing and mounting Pirates & Plunder on wood. I have found some great sources of cutouts/tiles/blocks by searching through the forums so I am set there. What I am wondering is, what is the most durable way to mount paper to wood and then fix/seal it so it will last indefinitley.

I thought about printing to label paper and then applying to wood and then applying some sealer, but I don't know if I trust label adhesive on wood, nor the label paper itself from fading or discoloring from the sealer. Anyone have good experience on this? I actually considered that Decopage stuff, but know next to nothing about it's durability. It seems like it might be long lasting, but I'm not normally a "craft" person, so I wouldn't know.
 
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Daniel Leitl
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Well, I have made a Lost Patrol game with just the counters printed on to cardstock and than glued to wooden disc and the map tiles glued to balsa wood sheets and sealed them with some spray varnish, I thought. The only thing I think about doing different is using regular paper as the cardstock was a little too thick. I would be careful with anykind of brush on varnish as previous experience has shown that it can cause some colors to run. When in doubt just try on small scrap first. Good luck with it and make sure to post pics of the final product.
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Dave Lartigue
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I printed images to sticky backed paper, stuck onto wooden disks, and then sprayed with ClearCoat:

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Brad Wagnon
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Buy a clear urethane sealer from the local hardware store. You can get it in a standard paint can, or a spray can. I think a very glossy finish would give the game pieces and tiles a rich look. You might want to experiment to see if you like a flat or satin finish better. You could also try a very light stain, to give your pieces an "antique" look.

Definitely try it out first to make sure the printer ink is not dissolved by the finish you are applying. You can also observe how much discoloration you get (should not be much, if any). If you apply a nice thick coat, the urethane should last indefinitely.
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Alan Kaiser
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MadBrad wrote:
Buy a clear urethane sealer from the local hardware store. You can get it in a standard paint can, or a spray can. I think a very glossy finish would give the game pieces and tiles a rich look.


You have to watch out with a glossy finish since it will likely cause glare problems. While annoying in and of itself it also may alter the way your eye sees color so you'd also have be be careful about which colors you select for the pieces with a finish like this. Stick with a matte finish for better results.

I've tried printing to full page labels and then mounting onto wooden pieces and it works just fine. The adhesive is pretty strong. One thing you will need to be very careful of is how you print onto the label paper. A good quality laser printer will give you a better and more lasting print. If you plan on using an inkjet printer then you'll need some type of clear coat finish to be sure the ink won't run or smudge.
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Gantry Rogue
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the other thing u can do is look around for scrapbooking stores or sites. They stress long-lasting acid-free paper products, so anything made with good stock will usually not fade or yellow and last longer than you or me
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Steve Sisk
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TedTorgerson wrote:
I use full page adhesive paper, but before I cut out the counters I cover the paper with self adhesive laminating paper. The counters look good and last a lot longer than with spray coats.

I'll second using any form of laminate over a spray coating. Laminates actually add an impermeable layer of plastic to your pieces to better protect them over the long haul.

There are a few choices... self adhesive (stick backed laminataes) or heat activated adhesive. I prefer the heat activated myself, if for no other reason than I love the matte finish that is available with some searching.
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Born To Lose, Live To Win
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I wonder about the laminates though, do they leave an edge that can be grabbed or accidentally picked? Here's why I ask, especially in King of the Tabletops case, all the counters will be in a bowl that you pull from periodically. The counters will typically be "tossed" like a salad often. I'm wondering if this type of abuse will catch the edges of a laminate. A spray or brushed coating would be flush (pretty much) with the paper and wood, especially if I make the paper part slightly smaller than the wooden.

Thanks for all the good info, in case anyone searches on this thread in the future, here is where I'm planning on buying my tiles:
http://www.caseyswood.com/shoppingcart/zen-cart/index.php?ma...
 
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Barry Kendall
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One thing experience has taught me is that a color copy is far more durable than a printer original. The fuser used to seal the color copy adds a low-lustre protective coating that is well worth the expense at a DIY copy place like Staples. I also recommend copying onto cardstock rather than paper as it's more durable and does not distort if you use a water-based adhesive.

I glue the copies onto art matting (with good old Elmers) and press with a large plastic wrap-covered book (with a pile of books on top for weight) until well set--24 hours or so. Then I cut counter strips horizontally and press again for another day.

Then I separate individual counters.

This allows the long cuts to be made while the matte board is still slightly damp and easy to cut with a rotary cutter and straightedge (on a cutting board, NOT the foam cutting material they sell at fabric shops).

Using this system I haven't had any counter wear despite repeated plays, even without using a final clear coat.

If such a coating is desired, acrylic matte medium is good (several light coats beats one heavy) and do spray, don't brush. Be sure you don't bond the piece to whatever you have it sitting on!

Alternatively, I've heard of some people having good success with a protective coating of hair spray!
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Steve Sisk
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TheChin! wrote:
I'm wondering if this type of abuse will catch the edges of a laminate.

I don't think the laminates themselves will catch any more than the actual paper that you print to and then adhere to the wooden tiles. The heat laminate especially because it is about half the thickness as most cold laminates.

If you're not planning on trimming the stickers to the exact size of the tiles, I can recommend some clear inkjet labels that are then adhered to the wood. They look almost exactly like you printed directly on the wood pieces.

A friend of mine did just that on a game that he has been using for years with no wear problems. I believe he used a clearcoat spray varnish after applying the stickers, though I'd have to ask to be sure.
 
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