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Subject: Hex tiles / grids and more. rss

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Mary Megrant
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I know that this is so basic that I hate to ask. However, ater having difficulty even cutting cardboard squares for a peice pack, I KNOW that I will not be able to manufacture my own hexes by cutting.

I am thinking of using cookie cutters with the flour salt homemade clay that used to be in vogue for crafts. (I've never tried it, but it should be way cheaper than polymer clay). But I already foresee that I will probably want to play around with various tilings of the plane, so I may nned custom tile sizes.

Is there some kind of quick and dirty "dinking around" kit? I would at least like to find paper printed with a hex grid.

I also want to make myself some dissection puzzles for my personal use. (like Tangrams), but there are other interesting dissections.

Does anyone know of an article at BGG or elsewhere analyzing pros and cons of various materials for hand crafting games? Or quick tricks of the trade?

Brings to mind a landscaping class. My group was all women, and we were trying to pound stakes all to the same level in the ground, to mark the elevation for a concrete slab we were pouring. Finally the instructor approached us, and he quickly just sawed the troublesome stakes to a uniform height.) It had never occured to us that we could do that!

Mary
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plantluvver wrote:

Is there some kind of quick and dirty "dinking around" kit? I would at least like to find paper printed with a hex grid.


Generate your own grids to specification using this free internet software:

http://www.incompetech.com/beta/plainGraphPaper/
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Christopher DeFrisco
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Ah, negative. I am a meat popsicle.
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Here's a link to the same site as the Graph paper, but for hex (hard to find otherwise):
http://incompetech.com/beta/hexagonalGraphPaper/hex.html
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Christopher DeFrisco
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Some more options are purchasing pre-cut blank hexes (not sure if it fits what you are thinking of):
http://www.pictorsstudio.shoppingcartsplus.com/catalog/item/...
http://www.pictorsstudio.com/annex.htm
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George Haberberger
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If you have access to a PostScript printer, you can modify the following to print hexes:

%!PS
% Hex Paper
% georgeha
% APril 8th, 2004

/inch {72 mul} def

/pwidth {8.5 inch} def
/pheight {11 inch} def
/hwidth 57.6 def

% change pwidth to match desired paper width
% change pheight to match desired paper width
% hwidth is hex width in points, 72 points per
% inch

/mt {moveto} def
/lt {lineto} def
/rt {rlineto} def

/hw2 {hwidth 2 div} def
/hside {1.155 hw2 mul} def
/hs2 {hside 2 div} def

/hex {
hw2 hs2 rt
0 hside rt hw2 neg hs2 rt
hw2 neg hs2 neg rt 0 hside neg rt
hw2 hs2 neg rt stroke
} def

/linehex {
hw2 hwidth pwidth {
dup 0 mt hex
hw2 add hside hs2 add mt hex} for
} def

%linehex

0 hside 2 mul pheight {
linehex
0 hside 3 mul translate}

for

showpage
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Jeff
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Not sure what size you're looking for but if you want to buy some already made you can find a few sizes by going to your neighborhood flooring center and asking for Hex tiles. They're common in bathrooms ...I noticed this one day while in the shower.

Somewhere in that statement there's one of those jokes that begins, "you know you've been gaming too much when..."


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Alex Henderson
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My free utility called DrawHexGrid and posted at http://cryhavocgames.net/Tutorials_Utilities.htm will create hex image patterns of any size, with or without hex numbers, etc.
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Drake Storm
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I had a similar question, but..

I don't want to know how to make the Hexagon shapes/grids, I want to know how to print and cut them out easily on something more sturdy than paper.

I tried to paste a paper hex grid to some thicker cardboard stock and tried to cut out the hexes with scissors, but it was too thick. Then I tried with a razor, but it was too much of a pain. The next option was to use a jigsaw, but cutting cardboard stock with a saw seemed a little too much work. I was also thinking of a paper cutter, but that would waste too much cardboard stock as you have to cut in straight lines and a hexagon grid printout doesn't have many.

Am I missing an obvious solution? Mine was to just create my games using squares for now and if they pan out, worry about hexagons later.
 
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Walt
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One suggestion I've heard is to use rectangles aligned like a common brick wall. (The technical name for this tiling escapes me.) Each rectangle has six neighbors, so it's equivalent to a hex grid. With the rectangles of proper dimension, a map can be tiled equivalently to a hex tiling. Essentially, 2/3rds of the hex lines in a conventional hex map will be, when viewed as a long zig-zag, parallel to an edge of the map/board: convert the zig-zags to average straight lines parallel to the edge. Then extend the remaining hex lines (individually parallel to the adjacent edges of the map) to meet those straight lines, forming somewhat pudgy bricks.

Another option is to use movement lines, like TransAmerica. As in TA, these can be varied to denote terrain. These have about the same impact on the underlying graphics as a grid.

A third option is to put points at the center of the hexes, like Empire Builder. This has the least impact on the graphics behind the hexes, but you have to make sure the dots are visible. EB uses icons other than dots to denote terrain, as well as having features, like rivers, between the dots.

Whether hex, brick, line, or dot, you can use lame-old Windows Paint to put a grid on a picture. Make a grid the same size as the picture by making one hex (or whatever) and then copying it to make two; copy the two to make four; four to make eight; etc. (Once you make a few, a little overlap will ensure exact alignment, and the stretch/skew tool can be useful.) Save that (so you never have to recreate the grid) and cut it into the clipboard. Bring the picture into Paint and paste using the option to make the background transparent (change the option just below the left menu when the select rectangle tool is on).
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Alex Henderson
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" I'm looking for a way to run both a playfield and a hexfield on the same map... is there a way to take a photo of something... or a rendered picture and add a hex grid to it? (without obscuring the picture underneath so that you really lose the picture quality?) "


Assuming I understand your question, and assuming you have access to a graphics editor like Photoshop or Paint Shop Pro, it's easy. Use DrawHexGrid (see above) to generate the hex grid image on a white background. Load that image into its own layer above the "playfield" image, use the magic wand tool to select all the white areas in the hex grid layer, and delete them. That's it!

PS - if you want center dots or cross-hairs in the hexes, DrawHexGrid will do that for you.
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Bill Bennett
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You can buy wooden hex tiles, sold for miniature figure bases, from http://www.litkoaero.com/

They are laser-cut for precision and come in three different thicknesses (3mm, 1.5mm and 0.8mm) and in ten sizes (from 1" to 3" and some in millimeters).

I have purchased both square and round bases for miniatures and their customer service has been excellent.

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Marlin Deckert
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Die cutting to make hexagonal tiles is another way to go. See this thread for more information: http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/129881.
 
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KK Su
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DrakeStorm wrote:
I had a similar question, but..

I don't want to know how to make the Hexagon shapes/grids, I want to know how to print and cut them out easily on something more sturdy than paper.

I tried to paste a paper hex grid to some thicker cardboard stock and tried to cut out the hexes with scissors, but it was too thick. Then I tried with a razor, but it was too much of a pain. The next option was to use a jigsaw, but cutting cardboard stock with a saw seemed a little too much work. I was also thinking of a paper cutter, but that would waste too much cardboard stock as you have to cut in straight lines and a hexagon grid printout doesn't have many.

Am I missing an obvious solution? Mine was to just create my games using squares for now and if they pan out, worry about hexagons later.


You need a Rotary Cutter. It's a circular razor-blade that you press down and roll to cut, instead of dragging like a normal razor. Makes cutting through cardboard MUCH easier. You can find them at any Scrapbook Craft shop, or Sewing Craft shop.

So what you do is:
1. Print your hexes out on normal paper.
2. Paste your hexes on cardboard.
3. Use Rotary cutter to slice hexes out.
 
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Steve
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Thanx - what a helpful link!
 
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Lajos
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plantluvver wrote:
Does anyone know of an article at BGG or elsewhere analyzing pros and cons of various materials for hand crafting games? Or quick tricks of the trade?

There is some info in the Print_and_Play_Games wikipage and even more in some of the geeklist mentioned in the bottom thereof.
 
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McRey Moyer
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http://www.spielmaterial.de/english/

They sell pre-cut hexagonal counters there.

Mac
 
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Eric Jome
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plantluvver wrote:
Is there some kind of quick and dirty "dinking around" kit?


Cut and paste the following into Notepad. Print.


_____ _____ _____ _____ _____ _____
/ \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \
/ \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \
/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \
\ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
\ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
\_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/
/ \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \
/ \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \
/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \
\ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
\ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
\_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/
/ \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \
/ \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \
/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \_____/ \
\ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
\ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /
\_____/ \_____/
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Jonathan "Gorno" Fashena
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Brick-laid "RectHexes" are nice for things where facing doesn't matter so much, especially as you can cut them out as a simple grid of continuous cuts (~7/6 ratio rectangles or just squares if you're lazy), then arrange then in offset rows. For cutting thicker stuff, try a paring or carving knife (and metal straight edge) and/or see: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/226297 and more generally BGG's DIY Forum, where we crafty folk hang out!

Gorno
 
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Jonathan "Gorno" Fashena
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re: Maps, http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/219633

Gorno
 
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Matthew Frederick
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Alex777 wrote:
Assuming I understand your question, and assuming you have access to a graphics editor like Photoshop or Paint Shop Pro, it's easy. Use DrawHexGrid (see above) to generate the hex grid image on a white background. Load that image into its own layer above the "playfield" image, use the magic wand tool to select all the white areas in the hex grid layer, and delete them. That's it!


Even easier, if you're using one of those applications, is to set the layer with the hexes to "multiply" and poof, the black lines will show up on the underlying image (black x anything = black) while the white parts will magically disappear (white x anything = anything).
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Matthew Frederick
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DrakeStorm wrote:
I had a similar question, but..

I don't want to know how to make the Hexagon shapes/grids, I want to know how to print and cut them out easily on something more sturdy than paper.

I tried to paste a paper hex grid to some thicker cardboard stock and tried to cut out the hexes with scissors, but it was too thick. Then I tried with a razor, but it was too much of a pain. The next option was to use a jigsaw, but cutting cardboard stock with a saw seemed a little too much work. I was also thinking of a paper cutter, but that would waste too much cardboard stock as you have to cut in straight lines and a hexagon grid printout doesn't have many.

Am I missing an obvious solution? Mine was to just create my games using squares for now and if they pan out, worry about hexagons later.


There is no easy solution (other than the expensive solution of buying a hex die and a die cutter). The rotary cutter suggestion above has the paper-wasting problem you mentioned, and all other methods are a huge hassle.

So sayeth one who has tried many, many, many things and has all the calluses to show for it.
 
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Jonathan "Gorno" Fashena
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How about cutting equilateral triangles (continuous cuts) in your backer, then using six as a backing held together by the facing and backing paper?

Do the tiles need to be more rigid or merely thicker? Flexible craft foam sheets, found everywhere, including big 2' x 1' (x 2 mm) sheets for 80 cents at Michael's Stores, and adhesive-backed ones, can be used for many projects.
I made this set of Carcassonne tiles with these as a backing for photo paper:
-- spray adhesive would make the non-adhesive kind adhesive, and a paring knife cuts them neatly (it took me years to think of that... with the big sheets and the "hexes with triangles between them so the cuts are continuous" outlay alluded to earlier, this is quite doable). (The trick is to incise the paper layer with an Xacto, then cut the foam underneath.) Paper affixed to one or both sides makes it more rigid (like home-made softcore-foamcore).

Gorno
 
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