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Hive» Forums » General

Subject: Why the creme color instead of white? rss

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Eric
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I was just wondering if there was a reason the pieces other than black are creme color instead of white for the color edition of the game? Maybe the creme is easier on the eyes?
 
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Virginia Milne
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Players associate the cream colour with ivory. Ivory playing pieces have given pleasure to generations of game players
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Ariel
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Classic, nicer, elegant?
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Ebony and ivory.

Those two have a long history as base material for robust objects.
E.g. (chess) playing pieces, piano/organ keys, violin fingerboards and tuning pegs,...
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Eric
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bonz wrote:
Ebony and ivory.

Those two have a long history as base material for robust objects.
E.g. (chess) playing pieces, piano/organ keys, violin fingerboards and tuning pegs,...


Yeah you're right. It does make sense when I think of it that way.
 
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Ian Noonan
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"The druid said the damned thing was friendly... HOW THE HELL WAS I SUPPOSED TO KNOW!!!”
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'Cause it looks nicer...
 
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Miah
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Since the pieces are made of Bakelite, I have a strong suspicion it's not any of the reasons given here, but rather the fact that Bakelite CANNOT stay white. The material oxidizes and yellows pretty quickly, and there is no way to prevent this. It's one of the easiest ways to identify fake vintage Bakelite - if the item is white, it's not Bakelite.
 
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Ariel
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Gryphon Tracks wrote:
Since the pieces are made of Bakelite, I have a strong suspicion it's not any of the reasons given here, but rather the fact that Bakelite CANNOT stay white. The material oxidizes and yellows pretty quickly, and there is no way to prevent this. It's one of the easiest ways to identify fake vintage Bakelite - if the item is white, it's not Bakelite.

Ok, but how do you explaing that the Color version have creme pieces and the Carbon version white ones? So the Carbon pieces are not made of bakelite? I'm pretty sure that the Carbon ones are less creme (but I could be wrong too).
 
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Miah
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Chango wrote:
Gryphon Tracks wrote:
Since the pieces are made of Bakelite, I have a strong suspicion it's not any of the reasons given here, but rather the fact that Bakelite CANNOT stay white. The material oxidizes and yellows pretty quickly, and there is no way to prevent this. It's one of the easiest ways to identify fake vintage Bakelite - if the item is white, it's not Bakelite.

Ok, but how do you explaing that the Color version have creme pieces and the Carbon version white ones? So the Carbon pieces are not made of bakelite? I'm pretty sure that the Carbon ones are less creme (but I could be wrong too).


That's the real mystery! I noticed after posting that the Carbon white pieces are indeed true white. Not sure why they went that way for Carbon, unless they thought the off-white just didn't look "Carbony" enough.

Could also be the Carbon pieces are not Bakelite after all, but a similar material that is not supposed to patinize like Bakelite does. There are a bunch of companies that make faux-Bakelite jewelry and other items from different plastics.

There's nothing wrong with that per se, except I'm not sure any of these materials share Bakelite's qualities of heat resistance and amazing durability. If those pieces are Bakelite, you could very well pass your Hive set down to your children and grandchildren - the true white pieces will be yellow, but they will still look and feel good. The cream pieces will look even better. No gurantees that any other modern plastic will endure as well.
 
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Russ Williams
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Gryphon Tracks wrote:
Since the pieces are made of Bakelite, I have a strong suspicion it's not any of the reasons given here, but rather the fact that Bakelite CANNOT stay white. The material oxidizes and yellows pretty quickly, and there is no way to prevent this. It's one of the easiest ways to identify fake vintage Bakelite - if the item is white, it's not Bakelite.

I think the Hive pieces are not literally Bakelite. They're just "bakelite" in the generic sense of a material reminiscent of Bakelite (like how people use "xerox" to mean any kind of photocopy).
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John Cooper
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They are most likely made from the same urea-formaldehyde resin that modern dominoes are made from. I own three such sets of dominoes: black, (bright) white, and "ivory" (off-white), just like the three colors of Hive pieces.
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Russ Williams
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FWIW the wikipedia article about Hive https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hive_%28game%29 says they are made of phenolic resin, which is used in making Bakelite and many other similar substances. (Bakelite is made from phenolic resin and wood flour.) Apparently phenolic resin is similar to but different from urea-formaldehyde.

But I am not a chemist.
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Miah
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russ wrote:
Gryphon Tracks wrote:
Since the pieces are made of Bakelite, I have a strong suspicion it's not any of the reasons given here, but rather the fact that Bakelite CANNOT stay white. The material oxidizes and yellows pretty quickly, and there is no way to prevent this. It's one of the easiest ways to identify fake vintage Bakelite - if the item is white, it's not Bakelite.

I think the Hive pieces are not literally Bakelite. They're just "bakelite" in the generic sense of a material reminiscent of Bakelite (like how people use "xerox" to mean any kind of photocopy).


This could be the case, but Bakelite is still manufactured and used in everything from cookware to auto brakes, aircraft parts and game components like Mah-Jongg tiles, so it's not out of the question. In many cases it's just called phenolic resin, but Bakelite is what it is.
 
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ŁṲÎS̈
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russ wrote:
I think the Hive pieces are not literally Bakelite.


How about we call them BakeliKe ?
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