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Subject: Only theme and collection value in here rss

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Kristof Tersago
Belgium
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What’s it about?
The players represent groups of pirates dwelling around in Pirates-town before hopping onboard of their ship. Points can be earned in the town and on the ship.
Winner is he/ she who has the most points after 5 rounds.


How does it work?
The town is build using the 9 tiles in a 3x3 grid, the red captain figure is placed on the starting spot and every player receives a certain amount of pirates.

The game is played in 5 rounds, each of 2 phases. During the first phase, the players walk around in town. During the second phase, battles are fought to see who gets on board of the ship. All this to gain different chips, representing victory points.

Phase 1: The town


During his turn, a player has to advance the captain to a neighboring free field on the board. To do this, he has to fill up all the spaces in the alley between the current location of the captain and the target location with his pirates. Now the action on this field is executed.
There is quite a lot of variation in actions. You can have a drinking contest in the bar, open treasure chests, look for secret maps,...

If a player wants, he can move the captain yet another time by paying one gold piece and placing his pirates. During his turn a player can also pass but this will also cost one gold piece. The final option is to move your remaining pirates to the ship.

Phase 2: The ship


The ship is basically an elimination race where the first three places score points. All pirates that have been moved here now roll dice against each other to see who will be eliminated in the battles. The three best players grab another point chip.

After the ship has set sail, all players collect their pirates, both from the board and from the ship, and another turn starts.

Winner is he/ she who has the most points at the end of round 5.

Where is the fun?
'Rum and Pirates' is an easy and pretty straightforward game. There is a decent amount of luck in the game due to the large amount of dice rolls both in the town as in the ship. Consider all this dice-rolling as mini-games in one large game.
But don't consider it to be anything more. This game is dice rolling in different forms with a tactical element built into the system. The only real decision you have to make is where the captain will be heading off to.

Why should I like this?
- Easy to learn
- Pirates theme

Why shouldn’t I like this?
- Luck dependant
- Repetitive gameplay

Final verdict
'Rum and Pirates' is fun during the first round, a bit numb during the second and dull during the last rounds. Too much dice rolling, too little choices (basically only where you are heading next in town), too repetitive.
Only buy this game if you want to have the full Alea set or if you like pirates. Otherwise, stay clear of it.

Note that this is a review and thus therefore not cover all the rules of the game.
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John Earles
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Quote:
Only buy this game if you want to have the full Alea set or if you like pirates. Otherwise, stay clear of it.


This is obviously your opinion, and you have every right to it.

I on the other hand will disagree.

I enjoy this game. My wife and I even enjoy the 2-player game. No it's not a brain-burning, über-strategy game. Look elsewhere if you want that. (It is a shame that people see Alea on the cover and cannot accept that the series does not have to be all super-heavyweights.) Yes, there is a lot of dice rolling. Look elsewhere, if you cannot stand a bit of luck influencing the game. You do have to put a lot of faith in random events. I treat this more like an "Ok, let's see how I can deal with that" challenge.

I like the "place a pirate", resource-management mechanism. I like trying to manoeuvre the Captain around to a position benefiting me. I like the various "games". I just think it is fun. Do you move to the bunks early to give yourself a majority, or try and gather up a few more pieces and take your chances with fewer pirates (but the benefit of winning ties)?

All that and you get to drink rum and say, "Avast!" and "Arrrr". arrrh

Avast!

Your mileage may indeed vary, but for me this is a fun family/friends game.
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John Lopez
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This is a light game that I skipped buying for pretty much the reasons you mention. If I didn't have a bevy of other light games I might have picked it up: this isn't a *bad* game. I didn't feel that there was much control, so the fun was mostly to be had by speaking in pirate voices. There are better games for that as well.

Edit: Use of the English language above third grade level.
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Curt Carpenter
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Quote:
The only real decision you have to make is where the captain will be heading off to.

Bah. The only real ddecision in Through The Desert is where to place your camels. The only real decision in Ra is whether to call Ra and what to bid. ...

This is clearly a game not everyone enjoys. But I find it fun for the whole game, very much unlike, say Pirate's Cove. In find that there enough dice events to even out the luck of the dice. I think it's fun for people who like to play the odds. By the way, the critical decision point is not just where you move the captain, but cost/value tradeoff of where you can go for the number of pirates it costs to get there. And where that would leave the captin for the next guy. I will concede that there can be a strong turn order binding problem if someone has a tendancy to leave the pirate in a good place for the next guy. But there are many many games where you do the same thing on every turn (such as the two mentioned above)--I think it's just whether you find each turn interesting or not that matters. And in this game, I do.
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Mik Svellov
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Musti wrote:
Only buy this game if you want to have the full Alea set or if you like pirates. Otherwise, stay clear of it.


There are a couple of alea games I wouldn't want to own, but this is not one of them. It is highly original, has a good mix of tactics and luck and is great fun!
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Kristof Tersago
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Looks like I should have popped in earlier here.

Let's start by saying that the conclusion is indeed a subjective statement. The 'what do and don't you like' is always more objective.

Now for the game. It's light and it's fun but I just feel it's so light, there is not much left after a few rounds. The pirate-management is basically money management, the battling at the ship is basically Risk,... There are indeed some tactical choices in how the captain moves. But to me that's not enough to make this a good game.

Now, this does not mean it's a bad game. Certainly not. It's just not my cup of tea. And I also feel that there are better games with similar mechanisms. But there is indeed no game I know of which combines these mechanisms in one game. And there aren't too muc pirate games either.

Bottom line: I think from the comments above that it's fair to say that the game will appeal if you look for a light game or a pirate-themed game.
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Curt Carpenter
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Musti wrote:
I also feel that there are better games with similar mechanisms.
Could you suggest some? I might like them. Especially those with a similar mechanism to how the pirates are put on the board and the captain moves around. Thanks.
 
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Kristof Tersago
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For me, there are two basic mechanism : the management of your limited supply of pirates and which location you go to (or avoid that your opponent goes to).

It is original to do it with pirates but if you think money instead of pirates, there are some games where you have to pay money to get somewhere. Sometimes even to block your opponent. I would suggest Hermagor, which, viewing your profile, might be a game you like. If you see it a bit wider, I might even suggest Leonardo where you also have a limited supply of meeples that needs to be carefully managed and can be used to hamper (or in a game like Caylus even block) your opponent.

To a certain extent, Funkenschlag can also be used. You can use your limited supply of money to buy power plant, resources or houses all of which have serious impact on what your opponent can do.

Perhaps I am stretching it too far now. And perhaps I'm missing some things in the game that you all have found. If so, please let me know.
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Scott Nelson
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Traders of Genoa, Louis the XIV and Dorn's other Robber Knight game have a similar moving and leaving stuff, breadcrumbs sort of thing.
To some extent, management issues are in Atlantic Star, and about as light, minus a few depth issues at times. FishFlluppenFrickadelin has the pick and deliver system without much/if any luck. Traders of genoa also have the pick up and deliver bits. It also has a lot of negotiation, (the game relies on it), but very much a similar game which is deeper, and caters to many more than Rum and Pirates/Reknown and Honor will. For how many have given it a 9 or 10, you might look into it...and ALEA make it too.
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