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Days of Decision III» Forums » Rules

Subject: US Entry options and the 2008 Annual Political Options rss

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Simon Nicholls
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Can anyone explain how the additional Political options in the 2008 annual work in relation to the 15.10 WiFFE US Entry system in DoD? We play DoD with WiFFE and have been using the optional US Entry system for a while - it seems to work well but we have sort of ignored the 2008 options until now and if we include them, I think we have to include all of them.

Firstly, are they actually compatible? If they are, do options US9,10,11,12 and 13 (plus CW9) replace or supplement playing of the options noted in their descriptions? If not, do we ignore those political options that relate to US Entry? And are US Entry actions now completely superceded by the political options?

It seems clear that you can only play the option if you have the necessary entry level but then what happens? For example US9 requires an entry level against Germany and Italy (or just Germany) so assuming you can show that level when you play the option, does it automatically implement USE options 11, 16 and 20? Or does it just allow these options to be played later in the US Entry phase? In either case, do you still roll for movemmet of a chit from the entry pool to the tension pool (I assume so)? And for each USE option?

Optional Rule 15.10 restricts the number of options you can play (to reflect those covered by the DoD Political options). Are the USE options now covered by these Political options also removed from the possibilities? For example, if you want to play USE option 11 you have to wait until you can show a much higher entry level and then play the US9 political option.

Any assistance greatly appreciated.


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Andrew
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My understanding is that those cards (the USE focused US ones) are meant for use with DoD and WiFFE, but when using the standard DoD Entry system, rather than 15.10.
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Grog Jones
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As the Japanese player who will be worrying about the US option play concerned, I'm thinking that if we use these, we should treat it similarly to a DOW option - you play the option in political affairs, then you can take any of the USEntry options in any following US entry stages. This would allow the us some control over tension.
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Simon Nicholls
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AndrewFW wrote:
My understanding is that those cards (the USE focused US ones) are meant for use with DoD and WiFFE, but when using the standard DoD Entry system, rather than 15.10.


I'm not sure that can be right. How would you play the WiFFE USE options without having tension and entry pools? These don't exist in DoD. I think it is intended that they are played as the options are specifically mentioned on the new cards.

However, as I said, I'm not really sure. Thanks for responding - clearly I am in uncharted waters here (at least as far BGG is concerned).
 
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Simon Nicholls
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Jes Nogger wrote:
As the Japanese player who will be worrying about the US option play concerned, I'm thinking that if we use these, we should treat it similarly to a DOW option - you play the option in political affairs, then you can take any of the USEntry options in any following US entry stages. This would allow the us some control over tension.


OK, but presumably if you pass the option by demonstrating the necessary entry level, then you don't need to do this again when you play the options in the US entry phase. And can you play all the options covered by the DoD political option in a single US Entry phase? I would say yes assuming you have the chits available.
 
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Laurence Williams
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Unaccustomed as I am to venturing an opinion let me have a crack at this.

In the DoD 3 rules, section 15.10 limits the US entry options playable by cutting out those covered by standard DoD 3 options (e.g. USE 15 - resources to Wallies, since this would be done via MP Option 3 in DoD). I think that it therefore applies that any of the supplementary options played also means that the relevant Wiffe US entry options are also replaced. There is a question as to what these might as not sure if this is clearly stated on the options themselves not having a set to hand at the moment.

As to the mechanics I would agree with Nogger that they could be played reactively and also that the requisite entry level would need to be shown at the time of the implementation of the event ONLY not necessarily at the time the option itself is played. I think this will give the US a minor increase in cost, since these options have a monitory cost as opposed to being free as US entry options in WiFFE, and the potential of building up a number of owed options in political affairs that may give other problems down the line.

Now having had a look at the rules again I am not so sure, could the supplementary options be used in addition to the original USE options? gIven that a couple of the US entry options are also covered now by the CW supplementary option, confused from Glasgow
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Andrew
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You play the card in the political phase. It then gives you the effect of having played that tension option.

To explain, using WiFFE entry, if I want to oil embargo Japan, I need the requisite amount of entry (and to have played the prerequisite options of Embargo Strategic Materials and Freeze Japanese Assets). I then do the Oil Embargo in the US Entry phase as a Tension option, and roll to generate tension (and if successful, move an entry chit to the tension pool).

When using the DoD3 Entry system, I instead play the card US13 during the political phase when my initiative is lower than Japan's, provided that I have previously played US12, and that Japan's entry total is over 65. The card itself then says that you get the effect of those options listed, which in this case is the oil embargo. You don't roll for tension, or any of that.

Without these cards, you have no way to do things like cut off trade with Japan prior to outright war if you're using DoD3 entry, instead of using the hybrid system.
 
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Chnodomar
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Hi Simon,

we've been playing DoD with WIFFE and we've also used 15.10 for US Entry. One member of our group was interested in finding out if creating the Ottoman Empire was a realistic option, so we decided to include the options from the 2008 annuals.

We have come across the same problem you described in your post. We concluded that the 2008 Annual must be referring to a previous version of WIF which didn't have US Entry Options 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 (there are a few more new ones that didn't seem to be present at the time).

As having both didn't seem to make sense, we have decided to remove all of those options.

Later we've also come to the conclusion that creating the Ottomans wasn't really a realistic option, so we scrapped using the 2008 annual entirely.

On another note, we also found changing partisan values (I can't remember which IPO that was) a too powerful option. Not only does it give you the ability to ease your garrison burden, but also do you gain a very cheap way of activating a minor. At the end this ended up being the main use of this option in our game. So it went into the scrap pool together with the rest of the Annual...

 
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