Justin Gortner
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So,

I have not tried to read too much about the game, as I do not want to spoil anything. But I want to understand what is in a "scenario" and if there is only one outcome. Would it be like playing the game of Clue with the same person, using the same weapon, and in the same room? Which would of course make playing the game useless. Or is it less extreme, maybe more like Imperial Assault, where even if you know certain small elements (certain triggers in rooms, say), you can still play through a second time and be challenged.

Any info would be great!
 
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Eisen Montalvo
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jgortner wrote:
So,

I have not tried to read too much about the game, as I do not want to spoil anything. But I want to understand what is in a "scenario" and if there is only one outcome. Would it be like playing the game of Clue with the same person, using the same weapon, and in the same room? Which would of course make playing the game useless. Or is it less extreme, maybe more like Imperial Assault, where even if you know certain small elements (certain triggers in rooms, say), you can still play through a second time and be challenged.

Any info would be great!


I have only played it once. My understanding is that it will take multiple game sessions to solve the game. Once it is solved, no need to play it again. To me it feels like a boardgame Myst (Video Game).
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Mathue Faulkner
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You can really only play the entire story once, but it's generally going to take 3-4 sessions to complete. It's like reading a "Choose Your Own Adventure" book where there is one correct answer, and you've already figured it out. There's really no reason to play the same story again. I'd estimate a total of 4-6 hours of play time.
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Dom Hiob
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jgortner wrote:
So,

I have not tried to read too much about the game, as I do not want to spoil anything. But I want to understand what is in a "scenario" and if there is only one outcome. Would it be like playing the game of Clue with the same person, using the same weapon, and in the same room? Which would of course make playing the game useless. Or is it less extreme, maybe more like Imperial Assault, where even if you know certain small elements (certain triggers in rooms, say), you can still play through a second time and be challenged.

Any info would be great!


hm, I just finished the Asylum scenario yesterday. I will try and not spoil anything. There is a basic story to be discovered in the scenario. Also, there are some puzzles. I don't know how many endings to the scenario there are, but I guess there may be basically only one successful ending (AFAIK).

All of these might naturally reduce your enjoyment of subsequent playthroughs of the same scenario. And I am afraid that if you remember certain ... things ... like solutions to puzzles and so on, another playthrough could be a cakewalk. Think Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective: The Thames Murders & Other Cases or, if you don't know that, think of a murder story. If you've once figured out the murderer, most of the time, you won't read the book again rightaway.

With all that being said, I guess you could still have lots of fun as a silent member of another group playing through the game, and watching them discover the story. You might see certain locations and items and such that never appeared in your playthrough.

ninja'd and could have guessed so

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Witold Jakubowski
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Think of it this way - what's the fun of watching once more a detective movie, when you already know who the killer is and the search for the killers identity was the main plot, main puzzle and main fun here.

TIME Stories scenarios consists of a story and some puzzles. You can play it for second time, but there will be no challange with the puzzles, no surprises with the plot and such.

And by "playing the game once" I mean couple of runs, that let's you win the scenario.
 
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Chris Tannhauser
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Running a scenario is like the movie Edge of Tomorrow where you use information gleaned from prior (failed) runs to make the next one more efficient—so while you will most probably get multiple runs at it (it took us three to solve "Asylum"), once you've solved it you're done.

It's akin to an RPG adventure module in that regard.
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Joshua Harris
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I think there is a bit of "it depends on YOU" at play here too.

I am one of those that seems to have a steel trap memory for puzzles and stories, so another play through would be a cake walk, and not worth my time. My wife, on the other hand, can't always remember a game that we played two weeks before... so she is a great candidate for bringing it back out 12-18 months later, and having a "used, like-new" experience on the replay.

That said, I don't think I would have any problem playing through with a different group, and taking a back seat to all major decision making. I could explore cards I hadn't seen before, get into my characters role, help out where needed, but refrain from leading the investigation at all. Not 100% as fun, but it would still be a great way to share the experience with 3 new people.

So, your own memory skills and willingness to take a backseat role in future plays will greatly impact your personal replay value.
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George Rothrock
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Plus, each "run" tells a particular story - way special way you failed to solve it, so in that sense, at least for me, they were all interesting plays.

I could enjoy playing as the "silent" character with new players, for sure.
I like the game as an experience: reading all of the cards out loud, in an appropriate character voice, not rushing, absorbing the card art and ambiance, trying to feel what I imagine the designer's intention for me as a player would be. Not in any hurry. That said, we did love the experience so much we played through the three/four runs to solve it in fairly short order...

But to me the game is more an experience/rpg rather than a game where you are looking for the optimum strategy, but I do tend to value the play experience of gaming, rather than the outcome - exploring the play space, seeing what happens, etc. I might have adopted this attitude to compensate for my middling win record, though

Plus, of course, there are more scenarios to play.
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Hector Castejon
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I have played both cases twice, with two groups. The second time, I was sometimes helping, sometimes guiding them to traps, and sometimes just doing nothing.

Making them fall into the trap was quite funny

I didn't had any puzzle to solve, but I had a lot of fun. If you like to roleplay, I think you can enjoy it 3 or 4 times at least.
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Clyde W
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I "beat" the game at 2p in about 3 hours. I'll never replay it again. I'm very much looking forward to new scenarios though!
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Mr G
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You can play the scenario once 'for real', which may involve a few runs through the various options.

There are not dozens of possible routes to take, rather a few red herrings, dead ends and so on.

You can't play it 'for real' once you know the solution. But you CAN take a character and run through with a new group as a guide to the mechanics but not making decisions. This is a lot of fun with the right group.

It's a heck of a lot like the old school 'investigative' scenarios for AD&D in the 1980s when hack and slash was going out of favour. Once you know the trick, twist, plot device , whatever, then you can still fight the monsters but it's less satisfying.

All that said, this is a truly excellent game. I'd happily pay the money for each single option scenario.

The closest analogy I can think of is buying a CD player (the base set) then buying each murder mystery CD as it is launched. It's great fun watching each episode but less so on repeat.
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B C Z
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The short version is that there is no randomization from game to game in terms of the potential solution.

This is not Clue or Mystery of the Abbey or Mansions of Madness where a different solution/scenario is created each play through.

Instead it is more like Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective: The Thames Murders & Other Cases where the text never changes, and additional plays would be to only discover any paths you chose not to take previously, kind of like taking sub-optimal routes through a "Choose your Own Adventure" just to see what would happen.

Later plays may also be like re-reading a mystery novel to determine if you can pick out additional details, but they will not change the sequence of events, the dialog, the prose or the eventual outcome.
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Tom Van 't veld
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Me and my wife have played Asylum twice. The second time, we let the other couple make the decisions. And although we new the story and the end, we had an absolute blast seeing them go through the story. Where we were stumbling around in our first play, the second time we moved like hell... only to go back to all the other things we had been doing the first time. We really enjoyed going through it a second time.

So yes, you can definitely play it more than once, although the first play effect will be lost. Kind of like watching "The sixth sense".
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Brandon Brockway

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I played through the Asylum scenario twice. First, was with my main gaming group, second was with my wife and sister/brother in-law (who had not played it). Even though I knew the Asylum story, and previously solved the puzzles, it was quite fun to observe how others worked through it and relive that original moment. With that said, I don't think I would play through it a third time. I think it's reasonable to play through each scenario twice this way, but not sure I would have the same group of 4 players take a second go.

Note that both time I played through the scenario in one, long, session.
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Wil
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donmakaron wrote:
Think of it this way - what's the fun of watching once more a detective movie, when you already know who the killer is and the search for the killers identity was the main plot, main puzzle and main fun here.


I'll comment that I personally get a lot of enjoyment out of experiencing a mystery film a second time with one or more people who haven't seen it. It's fun to experience it again with them and hear what they are thinking and what they are saying while secretly (and quietly) knowing how it turns out.

I have NOT played a Time Stories case twice to be able to say that this will be true with replays, but I think it will be and possibly even more so due to all of the discussion. Sure, this is along the lines of a game master type of experience for the second go at it but I think that will still be rewarding.

In fact, the extremely helpful gamer who taught my group at BGG commented that he was really enjoying hearing our thought process and re-experiencing it in that way.

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Byron Campbell
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It also depends on the scenario. Right away, Marcy Case is more replayable (but less fun IMO) than Asylum.

I may be in the minority here, but I plan to create a series of "challenges" to complete in each scenario. Rather than working toward the ending, you must accomplish a certain number of things in a set time limit, some of which require making different choices than the best path through the storyline would. Some could even be like an Easter egg hunt.
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Gamer D

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You'll only personally want to play through Asylum once. Once you have played it you know the answers to all the puzzles and it would be pointless to play it again, it would be like redoing a word puzzle you already finished and know the answers for.

That being said I had a lot of fun moderating the game for my two other groups after I played through it with my first group. All I did was hand out cards from the decks and tokens from the bank and otherwise just watched them play the game and make all the decisions. Watching my friends go through the adventure and how they handled the various challenges and pitfalls was a lot of fun.

So while you won't literally play an adventure more than once, if you're like me you might have fun watching other friends play through it and get a little extra play time from the adventures that way.
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Frank Jaeger
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I agree to what has been said:
- you play it only once
- you will probably play it again with friends and enjoy their experience
- the whole idea is a lot of fun and worth the money

If you think it is too expensive, compare it to a movie. If you go to the movie theater with 4 people you pay about $50, too. But with this game the next session - read: new scenario - will cost only $30. So I think it is absolutely worth its price. The experience is great.
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Dom Hiob
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this does not answer to the question of the thread, but rather answers to Frank Jaeger. So I'm putting it in spoiler tags.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
frank jaeger wrote:
If you think it is too expensive, compare it to a movie. If you go to the movie theater with 4 people you pay about $50, too. But with this game the next session - read: new scenario - will cost only $30. So I think it is absolutely worth its price. The experience is great.


First of all: I agree TIME Stories is well worth its money. I love the game and will buy the next couple expansions for sure.

That said, the more often I read the movie comparison, the more skeptical I get about it. Boardgaming as a hobby may be less expensive than going to the movies.* But: Comparing individual games to movies is kind of apples and oranges, IMO. If a movie theater offers tickets for 3$, I might say that is inexpensive. If a different movie theater offers tickets at 25$, I won't call that inexpensive just because collecting diamonds (or traveling, or playing golf) is more expensive. What I'm saying is: Calling something expensive or inexpensive should always be in comparison to something as similar as possible (also, that's how we use it in common language, see movie example above).

Compared to other board games and their play time, TIME Stories is quite expensive. Again: I think it's worth it, but there's no denying the fact that it's comparatively expensive.

As an afterthought: TIME Stories also does something similar to movies: You basically buy the cat in a bag. Other board games will let you know exactly what you get beforehand. By design, this is not possible in TIME Stories. In this way, TIME Stories actually is rather similar to a movie.

(*) I'm unsure about even that. The bottleneck for board gaming mostly is spare time and finding others who also have and want to share that spare time playing board games. So you might well end up with a bunch of games that only get played once or even never. Which makes their cost:manhour of fun ratio much worse. On the other hand, after watching a movie, you might decide you'd much rather not have seen it, so that may even out.
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Mathue Faulkner
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I must be a selfish gamer. I'd never think of playing the game a second time with friends...just so that they can experience the game.
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Joshua Harris
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mfaulk80 wrote:
I must be a selfish gamer. I'd never think of playing the game a second time with friends...just do that they can experience the game.


Not selfish, just different style of enjoyment.

90% of the reason I play games is to socialize and hang out with my friends and family. I l or co-ops, could care less if I win or lose, whatever. Gaming is just a vehicle for having fun with my friends.

Some people game for the challenge, or to test their brain power or skill against others.

Some people fall in between.

All are legitimate and valid reasons to game. Different strokes for different folks.
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jgortner wrote:
So,

I have not tried to read too much about the game, as I do not want to spoil anything. But I want to understand what is in a "scenario" and if there is only one outcome. Would it be like playing the game of Clue with the same person, using the same weapon, and in the same room? Which would of course make playing the game useless. Or is it less extreme, maybe more like Imperial Assault, where even if you know certain small elements (certain triggers in rooms, say), you can still play through a second time and be challenged.

Any info would be great!


It's more like a "Choose Your Own Adventure" book.

My husband and I played this game a couple of months ago (and did terribly with the other couple we played with). We played again with one change (one member of the other couple and a different friend) and we rocked it, but not because the three of us remembered everything. In fact, we found that we had forgotten quite a bit about the story. We also made sure to let the friend that had NOT played the game before guide the group (i.e. he played the Time Captain role for the whole game). This ended up being a good balancer.

Additionally, I'm planning on running this game at a local con. I'm not planning to "play" the game. I'll explain the rules and read the "A" cards to the group. Then I'll sit back and watch as the players play the game and make the decisions. I really enjoy instructing people in how to play games and watching others explore new games and ideas, so I anticipate a lot of fun for me.
 
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Greg Silberman
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Mostly.

You will know the answers to most if not all of the puzzles. You may have missed one or two points in the story but I would say those are not typically a huge deal.

That said, I think it is worthwhile. I really enjoyed my first play through of Asylum and I will likely teach/run it for one or more other groups then play the new stories as they come out.

The core box gives you the pieces necessary to play the expansions. If you don't like the sound of that, then don't buy the game.

I am considering on keeping my core set and then selling the expansions once I play them. Also, some people I game with have offered to buy or chip in on the expansions.

If the lack of replay-ability is a concern, split the cost, play someone else's copy or play something else.

Regards,

Greg
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