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Subject: Abuse under the power of the badge rss

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http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-daniel-hol...

So, the cop in Oklahoma that sexually assaulted several women using the power of his position was sentenced to 263 years in prison for "18 counts, including four first-degree rape counts as well as forcible oral sodomy, sexual battery, procuring lewd exhibition and second-degree rape." His victims ranged from a 17-year-old teenager to a 57-year-old grandmother. All of his victims were black and chosen because he believed they wouldn't report it - and many did not.

One thing that struck me when reading this article was a stat: "An Associated Press examination last year found that about 1,000 officers in the U.S. lost their licenses for sex crimes or other sexual misconduct over a six-year period." That lead me to this article. It makes the point that that figure is probably underreported, because it's only counting those that actually had their licenses revoked, doesn't count some states like California and New York because they had "no statewide system to decertify officers for misconduct" (?) and "some reported no officers removed for sexual misdeeds even though cases were identified via news stories or court records." (??)

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/fd1d4d05e561462a85abe50e7eaed...

I suppose this shouldn't surprise me as why should police be any different than other populations in the country. I'm not even sure what this translates to in terms of a percentage and whether it's higher or lower than the percentage in the general population over the same period. Yet it does bother me quite a bit given that these men have a lot of power over their victims.
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Andre
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she2 wrote:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-daniel-hol...

So, the cop in Oklahoma that sexually assaulted several women using the power of his position was sentenced to 263 years in prison for "18 counts, including four first-degree rape counts as well as forcible oral sodomy, sexual battery, procuring lewd exhibition and second-degree rape." His victims ranged from a 17-year-old teenager to a 57-year-old grandmother. All of his victims were black and chosen because he believed they wouldn't report it - and many did not.

One thing that struck me when reading this article was a stat: "An Associated Press examination last year found that about 1,000 officers in the U.S. lost their licenses for sex crimes or other sexual misconduct over a six-year period." That lead me to this article. It makes the point that that figure is probably underreported, because it's only counting those that actually had their licenses revoked, doesn't count some states like California and New York because they had "no statewide system to decertify officers for misconduct" (?) and "some reported no officers removed for sexual misdeeds even though cases were identified via news stories or court records." (??)

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/fd1d4d05e561462a85abe50e7eaed...

I suppose this shouldn't surprise me as why should police be any different than other populations in the country. I'm not even sure what this translates to in terms of a percentage and whether it's higher or lower than the percentage in the general population over the same period. Yet it does bother me quite a bit given that these men have a lot of power over their victims.


The disturbing side of this story, besides the rape aspect, is the fact that, as stated, some states do not have a decertification process. In other words, no one but fellow police and the citizenry is policing the police, for misdeeds. When that lack of accountability is present, abuse of power will be present as well.
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J.D. Hall
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When you employ fallible human beings as peace officers, give them a badge, a gun, and power over their fellow citizens, some of them are going to abuse that power.

Frankly, I'm surprised that so few do so.

That being said, it is bothersome that some governments at all different levels are satisfied with so little review over police conduct. But there is a big pushback from police officers and their families and/or supporters about holding cops more responsible for their actions. Police, after all, are extremely unpopular with most of the populace, not just minorities or the poor. No one likes to see those flashing lights in their rear view mirror. That tends to have police "circle the wagons" so to speak, and form that thin blue line to keep others out of their business. There needs to be more dialogue, more interaction between police officers and the people they serve to diminish that level of distrust on both sides.

Also damn glad that little weasel will never step foot out of prison alive. He is scum.
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Andre
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Methinks much of the hostility towards those in blue stem from the fact that they do 'circle the wagon' and make a concerted effort to keep their business, as their business. So when a case like this comes along...it only reinforces that hostility. When they demonstrate, more by policies and actions, their intent to police themselves, and allow outside agencies to police them, I think hostility toward them will decrease. So far, I don't think they've done a good job at that.
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I'm glad they threw the book at this guy. I'm sure the other inmates will ensure he gets the kind of punishment he deserves.

This is a terrible thing, but there are 1.1 million police in the US. 1000 of them going bad this way is a amall percentage. Nevertheless, I hope they find ways to better prevent it.
 
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J.D. Hall
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And to threadjack a little bit:

As an Oklahoman, it should be noted that this trial took place in Oklahoma City, with an all-white and majority male jury, a white judge, and a white DA. The defendant was white.

The victims, many of whom testified, were black. All but one had criminal records for drug possession and/or prostitution.

The jurors threw the fucking book at this scumbag.

Guess Oklahomans haven't learned California-style justice yet....
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Chad Ellis
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tesuji wrote:
I'm glad they threw the book at this guy. I'm sure the other inmates will ensure he gets the kind of punishment he deserves.


I have a no sympathy for a serial rapist, but what the fuck? It's hard to read this as anything other than, "In prison he'll get raped himself and that's a good thing." Is that what you intended?
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remorseless1 wrote:
And to threadjack a little bit:

As an Oklahoman, it should be noted that this trial took place in Oklahoma City, with an all-white and majority male jury, a white judge, and a white DA. The defendant was white.

The victims, many of whom testified, were black. All but one had criminal records for drug possession and/or prostitution.

The jurors threw the fucking book at this scumbag.

Guess Oklahomans haven't learned California-style justice yet....


I give a lot of the kudos to the groups that got this press so that everyone in the process was aware that they were being scrutinized. As well as to them for coming to the courtroom to support the witnesses. Prior to their involvement, there was no press and the courtroom was empty of anyone supporting these women.
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Josh
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Somewhat interesting to note that Oklahoma County's* DA is an ex-cop who has had the cojones to aggressively prosecute more than a few cases that could have been swept under the rug due to expediency, such as a cop who shot a fleeing suspect in the back, and a pharmacist who straight-up executed a kid during a robbery (the local sentiment favored that the kid got what he deserved).

*Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Yep.
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J.D. Hall
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she2 wrote:
remorseless1 wrote:
And to threadjack a little bit:

As an Oklahoman, it should be noted that this trial took place in Oklahoma City, with an all-white and majority male jury, a white judge, and a white DA. The defendant was white.

The victims, many of whom testified, were black. All but one had criminal records for drug possession and/or prostitution.

The jurors threw the fucking book at this scumbag.

Guess Oklahomans haven't learned California-style justice yet....


I give a lot of the kudos to the groups that got this press so that everyone in the process was aware that they were being scrutinized. As well as to them for coming to the courtroom to support the witnesses. Prior to their involvement, there was no press and the courtroom was empty of anyone supporting these women.


Uhm, there was a lot of press on this case. Just didn't hit the national news until the trial was ready to go. And yes, kudos to the local groups who got out to support the victims inside and outside the courtroom. But trust me, there was press in the courtroom. I know those guys.
 
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Daniel
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According to this, domestic abuse is almost double the rate for spouses of state law enforcement officers.

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/cops-beat-wives-girlfriends...
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dandechino wrote:
According to this, domestic abuse is almost double the rate for spouses of state law enforcement officers.

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/cops-beat-wives-girlfriends...


Wow, that's fucked up. It speaks to either the stress of their positions or just them not getting help.
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Mac Mcleod
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she2 wrote:
dandechino wrote:
According to this, domestic abuse is almost double the rate for spouses of state law enforcement officers.

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/cops-beat-wives-girlfriends...


Wow, that's fucked up. It speaks to either the stress of their positions or just them not getting help.


And for some people the type of person the job attracts in the first place.

---

In addition to the above actual criminal police, you need to keep in mind the other police who know and say nothing. Even if they do nothing, it makes them just as bad as the bad cops. They are not protecting the office of police officer or the image of the police department. They are protecting bad people who should not be police officers.
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Wendell
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maxo-texas wrote:
she2 wrote:
dandechino wrote:
According to this, domestic abuse is almost double the rate for spouses of state law enforcement officers.

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/cops-beat-wives-girlfriends...


Wow, that's fucked up. It speaks to either the stress of their positions or just them not getting help.


And for some people the type of person the job attracts in the first place.

---

In addition to the above actual criminal police, you need to keep in mind the other police who know and say nothing. Even if they do nothing, it makes them just as bad as the bad cops. They are not protecting the office of police officer or the image of the police department. They are protecting bad people who should not be police officers.


I was reading here in the Dayton paper about local police going to Danville OH to attend a funeral for a cop who was killed there. That sort of solidarity is admirable because Danville isn't close and I doubt anybody knew the poor guy personally.

Unfortunately, this admirable solidarity has as a negative flip side the whole code of silence. And again, the small proportion of really bad cops (it IS a small proportion) end up being protected, maybe uneasily, by the others.
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remorseless1 wrote:
she2 wrote:
remorseless1 wrote:
And to threadjack a little bit:

As an Oklahoman, it should be noted that this trial took place in Oklahoma City, with an all-white and majority male jury, a white judge, and a white DA. The defendant was white.

The victims, many of whom testified, were black. All but one had criminal records for drug possession and/or prostitution.

The jurors threw the fucking book at this scumbag.

Guess Oklahomans haven't learned California-style justice yet....


I give a lot of the kudos to the groups that got this press so that everyone in the process was aware that they were being scrutinized. As well as to them for coming to the courtroom to support the witnesses. Prior to their involvement, there was no press and the courtroom was empty of anyone supporting these women.


Uhm, there was a lot of press on this case. Just didn't hit the national news until the trial was ready to go. And yes, kudos to the local groups who got out to support the victims inside and outside the courtroom. But trust me, there was press in the courtroom. I know those guys.


For you as a local, I'm sure you perceive there was a lot of press. I meant that there was no national news coverage. Even now, it's getting very little. I'm sure you can appreciate that if the victims were white women, it would have been all over the national news.
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Daniel
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Chalk this one up to another batch of those rare bad apples: http://thefreethoughtproject.com/cops-lock-man-scalding-show...

Quote:

Miami, FL — In 2012, a 50-year-old mentally ill prison inmate named Darren Rainey died while locked in a scalding hot shower, rigged to inflict retribution on prisoners, by guards at Dade Correctional Institution.

Guards put the schizophrenic man in the shower as punishment for defecating in his cell. Instead of getting Rainey the help that he obviously needed, guards took it upon themselves to inflict torturous punishment for hours.

For more than three years, not one of the guards involved in the torture and death of Rainey have been disciplined.

And now, just last week, the Miami-Dade Medical Examiner’s autopsy report concluded that Rainey died from complications of schizophrenia, heart disease and “confinement” in the shower — but ruled that his death was ‘accidental.’



Of course this was all accidental.
 
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