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Subject: [WIP] But for me and my friends only... rss

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mortego
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"Rolling 4x4" (a spin-off of Roll For It!)


Rolling 4x4 is a game of lucky dice rolling where players have 4 turns in 4 rounds to get a sequence of numbers to score points, the more dice used to make a sequence the more points they score.

2 – 4 Players
Ages 6+
Playing time: 15 – 20 min.

Components: 24 six-sided playing dice (6 of each color; red, yellow, green & black), 1 orange six-sided die for round keeping and 20 light blue cubes (LBC).

Game Set-Up: Each player starts with 6 dice of the same color. Players roll all six dice to determine how many LBCs (light blue cube) they will start with; for each pair of dice they roll equal to 7 they receive one cube. Example: Gerald rolls all six of his dice and rolls a 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 & 6. He can make two pairs equal 7, 3+4 & 6+1 so he receives two LBCs to start the game. (More about what LBCs do later.)

Object of the Game: Players have 4 turns to make a numerical sequence from their dice & gain points at the end of each round depending on how large their dice sequence is, at the end of four rounds whomever has the most points scored wins.

The Game: Determine who goes first; roll 2 dice, highest result goes first, roll off all ties. The first player sets the orange dice to “1” to track the turns, after all players take their turn the orange dice is set to “2” and so on until the fourth turn which is the end of the round. The orange dice is then passed to the next player for round two and the orange dice is set to “1” again to keep track of round two. The game is played in four rounds each consisting of four turns for each player. On a player’s first turn each round they will roll all six dice and use the results to determine where they will start their sequence;

Example: On her opening turn Laura rolls all six dice and rolls a 2, 3, 3, 3, 4 & 5. She will now decide how to start her sequence. She decides that she’ll start her sequence by placing her dice in this order; 2, 3, 4, 5. The two remaining dice (3 & 3) are not able to be used in her sequence since she already has a 3. Laura’s turn is now over and the next player starts their turn.

(Note: if on a player’s first turn their dice results cannot produce a sequence of two or more dice then, they are allowed to reroll all of their dice at no cost but those results remain standing and cannot be re-rolled again)

Example (con't.) On Laura’s next turn (second turn) she rolls her two remaining dice and rolls a 3 & 6, she then places the 6 next to her 5 therefore extending her sequence by another dice. She is unable to use her 3 because there’s already a 3 in her sequence.

Laura’s third turn is lucky for her as she rolled her last remaining dice and the result was a 1. She then adds it to her sequence beside the 2 and has a completed sequence of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6. Laura is immediately awarded an LBC that she can use to alter any of her future dice results (see LBC below). She will score 6 points at the end of this round for using all 6 dice in her sequence. Lucas however was only able to use 4 of his dice to make his sequence by the end of the round and will score 4 points.


This continues until all four players have had four turns and then score their points depending on how many dice they used to make a sequence.

Placing Dice: When players place their dice after their initial dice placement they must be able to add them to the sequence without creating any gaps.

Example: Julio already has a sequence of 2 & 3 as a result from his initial dice placement on his first turn, his results from his second turn are 1, 5, 5 & 6. He is able to add the 1 to his sequence but not the 5 & 6 because a 4 is missing. If he had rolled a 1, 4, 5 & 6 he would’ve then been able to complete his entire sequence.

LBCs: Players immediately receive an LBC when they complete a sequence using all 6 of their dice. Players also receive LBCs during a round in which they pass their turn because they have already completed their six dice sequence.

Example: During Laura’s fourth turn she has to pass because she already completed her sequence during her third turn (see above example) but because she has already completed her sequence she will receive an additional LBC as a reward for completing her sequence before the end of the round. If Laura had been extremely lucky on her first turn & rolled a 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 therefore making her 6 dice sequence on her first roll she would have immediately received an LBC for completing her 6 dice sequence, then she’ll gain an additional LBC during her second turn, then third and fourth turn winding up with four LBCs by the end of that round.

LBCs can be used during a player’s turn in two ways and as many times as they can pay in cubes:

1.) Use an LBC to alter one dice result +1 or -1 before adding it to that player’s sequence. Players may use more than one LBC to change a dice result even further +1 or -1.

Example: Lucas wants to change his 4 to a 6 so he has to use two LBCs to change that 4 to a 6.

2.) Use two LBCs to reroll any of their three dice of that player’s choosing (any 3 of 6, even if they’re already in their placed sequence).

Scoring: At the end of each round players will receive points based on their sequence they built for that round; 6 dice used in a sequence scores 6 points and that player receives an LBC, 5 dice used scores 5 points, 4 dice 4 points and so on… This happens at the end of all four rounds. In addition to scoring player’s sequences at the end of the fourth round LBCs are also scored as bonus points (for every 2 LBCs a player has remaining they score 1 bonus point). After all player’s scores are tallied the player with the most points win, ties are broken by the player who had the most unused LBCs. If still a tie then all tied players share the win!
 
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Sturv Tafvherd
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killerjoe1962 wrote:
"Rolling 4x4" (a spin-off of Roll For It!)


Rolling 4x4 is a game of lucky dice rolling where players have 4 turns in 4 rounds to get a sequence of numbers to score points, the more dice used to make a sequence the more points they score.

2 – 4 Players
Ages 6+
Playing time: 15 – 20 min.

Components: 24 six-sided playing dice (6 of each color; red, yellow, green & black), 1 orange six-sided die for round keeping and 20 light blue cubes (LBC).

Game Set-Up: Each player starts with 6 dice of the same color. Players roll all six dice to determine how many LBCs (light blue cube) they will start with; for each pair of dice they roll equal to 7 they receive one cube. Example: Gerald rolls all six of his dice and rolls a 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 & 6. He can make two pairs equal 7, 3+4 & 6+1 so he receives two LBCs to start the game. (More about what LBCs do later.)

Object of the Game: Players have 4 turns to make a numerical sequence from their dice & gain points at the end of each round depending on how large their dice sequence is, at the end of four rounds whomever has the most points scored wins.

The Game: Determine who goes first; roll 2 dice, highest result goes first, roll off all ties. The first player sets the orange dice to “1” to track the turns, after all players take their turn the orange dice is set to “2” and so on until the fourth turn which is the end of the round. The orange dice is then passed to the next player for round two and the orange dice is set to “1” again to keep track of round two. The game is played in four rounds each consisting of four turns for each player. On a player’s first turn each round they will roll all six dice and use the results to determine where they will start their sequence;

Example: On her opening turn Laura rolls all six dice and rolls a 2, 3, 3, 3, 4 & 5. She will now decide how to start her sequence. She decides that she’ll start her sequence by placing her dice in this order; 2, 3, 4, 5. The two remaining dice (3 & 3) are not able to be used in her sequence since she already has a 3. Laura’s turn is now over and the next player starts their turn.

(Note: if on a player’s first turn their dice results cannot produce a sequence of two or more dice then, they are allowed to reroll all of their dice at no cost but those results remain standing and cannot be re-rolled again)

Example (con't.) On Laura’s next turn (second turn) she rolls her two remaining dice and rolls a 3 & 6, she then places the 6 next to her 5 therefore extending her sequence by another dice. She is unable to use her 3 because there’s already a 3 in her sequence.

Laura’s third turn is lucky for her as she rolled her last remaining dice and the result was a 1. She then adds it to her sequence beside the 2 and has a completed sequence of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6. Laura is immediately awarded an LBC that she can use to alter any of her future dice results (see LBC below). She will score 6 points at the end of this round for using all 6 dice in her sequence. Lucas however was only able to use 4 of his dice to make his sequence by the end of the round and will score 4 points.


This continues until all four players have had four turns and then score their points depending on how many dice they used to make a sequence.

Placing Dice: When players place their dice after their initial dice placement they must be able to add them to the sequence without creating any gaps.

Example: Julio already has a sequence of 2 & 3 as a result from his initial dice placement on his first turn, his results from his second turn are 1, 5, 5 & 6. He is able to add the 1 to his sequence but not the 5 & 6 because a 4 is missing. If he had rolled a 1, 4, 5 & 6 he would’ve then been able to complete his entire sequence.

LBCs: Players immediately receive an LBC when they complete a sequence using all 6 of their dice. Players also receive LBCs during a round in which they pass their turn because they have already completed their six dice sequence.

Example: During Laura’s fourth turn she has to pass because she already completed her sequence during her third turn (see above example) but because she has already completed her sequence she will receive an additional LBC as a reward for completing her sequence before the end of the round. If Laura had been extremely lucky on her first turn & rolled a 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 therefore making her 6 dice sequence on her first roll she would have immediately received an LBC for completing her 6 dice sequence, then she’ll gain an additional LBC during her second turn, then third and fourth turn winding up with four LBCs by the end of that round.

LBCs can be used during a player’s turn in two ways and as many times as they can pay in cubes:

1.) Use an LBC to alter one dice result +1 or -1 before adding it to that player’s sequence. Players may use more than one LBC to change a dice result even further +1 or -1.

Example: Lucas wants to change his 4 to a 6 so he has to use two LBCs to change that 4 to a 6.

2.) Use two LBCs to reroll any of their three dice of that player’s choosing (any 3 of 6, even if they’re already in their placed sequence).

Scoring: At the end of each round players will receive points based on their sequence they built for that round; 6 dice used in a sequence scores 6 points and that player receives an LBC, 5 dice used scores 5 points, 4 dice 4 points and so on… This happens at the end of all four rounds. In addition to scoring player’s sequences at the end of the fourth round LBCs are also scored as bonus points (for every 2 LBCs a player has remaining they score 1 bonus point). After all player’s scores are tallied the player with the most points win, ties are broken by the player who had the most unused LBCs. If still a tie then all tied players share the win!


To be honest, I don't have a high opinion of Roll for It. But, I think Roll for It actually has a level of strategy to it.

This game is very heavy on luck. Overall, there's nothing wrong with luck-based games ... just that it will be a "hard sell" on these forums.

Aside from that, I like your rule-writing.
 
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George P.E., PMP, DM
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When you say, "[WIP] But for me and my friends only...," does that mean you do or don't want feedback here?
 
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mortego
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GeorgeMo wrote:
When you say, "[WIP] But for me and my friends only...," does that mean you do or don't want feedback here?


I guess I mean I'd like some feed back but I'm not at all interested in going further with this game idea. Feed back is totally appreciated!
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mortego
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Stormtower wrote:
killerjoe1962 wrote:
"Rolling 4x4" (a spin-off of Roll For It!)


Rolling 4x4 is a game of lucky dice rolling where players have 4 turns in 4 rounds to get a sequence of numbers to score points, the more dice used to make a sequence the more points they score.

2 – 4 Players
Ages 6+
Playing time: 15 – 20 min.

Components: 24 six-sided playing dice (6 of each color; red, yellow, green & black), 1 orange six-sided die for round keeping and 20 light blue cubes (LBC).

Game Set-Up: Each player starts with 6 dice of the same color. Players roll all six dice to determine how many LBCs (light blue cube) they will start with; for each pair of dice they roll equal to 7 they receive one cube. Example: Gerald rolls all six of his dice and rolls a 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 & 6. He can make two pairs equal 7, 3+4 & 6+1 so he receives two LBCs to start the game. (More about what LBCs do later.)

Object of the Game: Players have 4 turns to make a numerical sequence from their dice & gain points at the end of each round depending on how large their dice sequence is, at the end of four rounds whomever has the most points scored wins.

The Game: Determine who goes first; roll 2 dice, highest result goes first, roll off all ties. The first player sets the orange dice to “1” to track the turns, after all players take their turn the orange dice is set to “2” and so on until the fourth turn which is the end of the round. The orange dice is then passed to the next player for round two and the orange dice is set to “1” again to keep track of round two. The game is played in four rounds each consisting of four turns for each player. On a player’s first turn each round they will roll all six dice and use the results to determine where they will start their sequence;

Example: On her opening turn Laura rolls all six dice and rolls a 2, 3, 3, 3, 4 & 5. She will now decide how to start her sequence. She decides that she’ll start her sequence by placing her dice in this order; 2, 3, 4, 5. The two remaining dice (3 & 3) are not able to be used in her sequence since she already has a 3. Laura’s turn is now over and the next player starts their turn.

(Note: if on a player’s first turn their dice results cannot produce a sequence of two or more dice then, they are allowed to reroll all of their dice at no cost but those results remain standing and cannot be re-rolled again)

Example (con't.) On Laura’s next turn (second turn) she rolls her two remaining dice and rolls a 3 & 6, she then places the 6 next to her 5 therefore extending her sequence by another dice. She is unable to use her 3 because there’s already a 3 in her sequence.

Laura’s third turn is lucky for her as she rolled her last remaining dice and the result was a 1. She then adds it to her sequence beside the 2 and has a completed sequence of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6. Laura is immediately awarded an LBC that she can use to alter any of her future dice results (see LBC below). She will score 6 points at the end of this round for using all 6 dice in her sequence. Lucas however was only able to use 4 of his dice to make his sequence by the end of the round and will score 4 points.


This continues until all four players have had four turns and then score their points depending on how many dice they used to make a sequence.

Placing Dice: When players place their dice after their initial dice placement they must be able to add them to the sequence without creating any gaps.

Example: Julio already has a sequence of 2 & 3 as a result from his initial dice placement on his first turn, his results from his second turn are 1, 5, 5 & 6. He is able to add the 1 to his sequence but not the 5 & 6 because a 4 is missing. If he had rolled a 1, 4, 5 & 6 he would’ve then been able to complete his entire sequence.

LBCs: Players immediately receive an LBC when they complete a sequence using all 6 of their dice. Players also receive LBCs during a round in which they pass their turn because they have already completed their six dice sequence.

Example: During Laura’s fourth turn she has to pass because she already completed her sequence during her third turn (see above example) but because she has already completed her sequence she will receive an additional LBC as a reward for completing her sequence before the end of the round. If Laura had been extremely lucky on her first turn & rolled a 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 therefore making her 6 dice sequence on her first roll she would have immediately received an LBC for completing her 6 dice sequence, then she’ll gain an additional LBC during her second turn, then third and fourth turn winding up with four LBCs by the end of that round.

LBCs can be used during a player’s turn in two ways and as many times as they can pay in cubes:

1.) Use an LBC to alter one dice result +1 or -1 before adding it to that player’s sequence. Players may use more than one LBC to change a dice result even further +1 or -1.

Example: Lucas wants to change his 4 to a 6 so he has to use two LBCs to change that 4 to a 6.

2.) Use two LBCs to reroll any of their three dice of that player’s choosing (any 3 of 6, even if they’re already in their placed sequence).

Scoring: At the end of each round players will receive points based on their sequence they built for that round; 6 dice used in a sequence scores 6 points and that player receives an LBC, 5 dice used scores 5 points, 4 dice 4 points and so on… This happens at the end of all four rounds. In addition to scoring player’s sequences at the end of the fourth round LBCs are also scored as bonus points (for every 2 LBCs a player has remaining they score 1 bonus point). After all player’s scores are tallied the player with the most points win, ties are broken by the player who had the most unused LBCs. If still a tie then all tied players share the win!


To be honest, I don't have a high opinion of Roll for It. But, I think Roll for It actually has a level of strategy to it.

This game is very heavy on luck. Overall, there's nothing wrong with luck-based games ... just that it will be a "hard sell" on these forums.

Aside from that, I like your rule-writing.


Yup, very luck-based and not really for gamer types, more like for non-gaming family members like Gram and others.
Thanks for the good nod of rule writing, my wife said I should write rules as a side job, lol!
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George P.E., PMP, DM
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It looks a lot better than Tenzi

 
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mortego
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I was actually thinking of buying that game just for the dice!
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