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Subject: Your biggest difficulties rss

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Albin Svensson
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As the header say. I'm interested in what you guys think.

What is your biggest difficulties and problems with your games? consider all the aspects from the starting idea to the production and marketing your games.

What is the most difficult and most tiresome obstacle to climb? how do you solve them?

//Albin
 
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Eddy Sterckx
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The step from working prototype to print 'n play files.

Coming up with ideas and making prototypes to test them out is fun. But once the design is finalized I'm basically 'done' with that game and I move on to the next project. Been doing this for 30 years, never felt the need to take it further.

But then last year a contest interested me enough to take it one step further : make it a print & play game. That part is just like work. Not saying I'm not ever going to do that again, but the incentive needs to be there for me.

The contest :

http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1457288/wip-waterloo-squares...

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Maher Sagrillo
United States
Denver
Colorado
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I design games, and am inspired to make more, at a far faster rate than I could possibly make them.
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James Campbell
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
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Marketing, marketing and marketing.

Idea to Design to Prototype .. even to Manufacturing is relatively easy compared to Marketing your game.

There are SO MANY new games coming out every week its difficult to get noticed amongst the raucous without being one of the well known big-names in the industry.

It takes time, effort and attention away from making more games, refining existing games, and life in general.

How to solve the issue? Without spending money on someone to market the game for you .. I have no idea. I just plug away as I can;
Contribute to forums, contribute on facebook groups, go to meetups and conventions whenever possible, attend game nights wherever possible, blog, press releases.
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Jeff Warrender
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Averill Park
New York
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For me, it's without question going from the idea to the first physical prototype. Altering prototype components isn't always a picnic either, but there's just quite a barrier to actually sitting down at the computer and making all of the cards and the board and whatnot from scratch, and then printing and cutting and sleeving and mounting and so on. It's not the enjoyable part of design for me, but it lives between the two enjoyable parts -- the designing and the playtesting -- so it's a necessary evil (not that it's especially evil, of course!).
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Michael Brettell
Australia
South Turramurra
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I haven't got as far as production, other than PnP, so can't comment on that aspect. For me so far its the endless loop of testing and simplification. We've been working on our first game for a number of years now, and I think we're finally at the point of not making any more major changes. Seeing the game from the point of view of someone who knows nothing about it is something that is very difficult, but something I'm hopefully learning, and of course play-testing is invaluable in this regard. Knowing when to stop the design changes could be the next big challenge.
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Carl Nyberg
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Yes, I'm in the same boat of playtesting and adjusting and playtesting. The most difficult part of this is finding people to test the game.
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Charles Ward
Japan
Matsumoto
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bill437 wrote:
Yes, same here. Playtesting - finding people to test the game (mine and others).
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Jay Sears
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In order of difficulties for me are:

1. Taking on someone else's game to re-design (it is like designing a new game from scratch but also adding in their ideas to create something new). To me it doubles the difficulty.

2. Creating a good enough prototype, and then having to re-do it again because you decided some mechanics were useless. Can be very time consuming and frustrating.

3. Getting all my ideas out of my head in time and trying to make sense of them in a logistical manner. I can easily come up with 5 new game ideas in seconds but then turning that into something concrete on paper is a real challenge as I will come up with idea, after idea, after idea in quick succession that my hand can;t keep up with how fast my brain processes things.

What I do though is use my guide to cover all areas whehn creating a new board game. Here it's here if you want to take a look: http://www.pixygamesuk.co.uk/blog.html

I will put some more blogs up each month to turn my experiences and research into useful articles.
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Hal
United Kingdom
Norwich
Norfolk
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My biggest difficulty recently has been recognising what's an interesting feature and what's a problem with the game. I don't want to smooth all the character out my games, but telling what is a lovable quirk and what is an annoying flaw is something I find difficult.
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Martin Windischer
Austria
Innsbruck
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Finding a publisher.

Until this stage I like every aspect of the designing process. I like to brainstorm ideas. I like to create a first working ruleset out of these ideas. I like to create a first (functional) graphic design and to build the first prototype. I like to playtest and revise the rules again and again. And often I end up with a (in my eyes) really good game.

Although it takes much time these are all tasks I like. I am miserable in marketing and I would really dislike the work I had to do if I were going the self-publishing route.
But so far I wasn't successful in finding a publisher.

My "solution" to this is to procrastinate. About once a year when I'm in the right mood I'm contacting a publisher per e-mail with one of my games. I also have found that the game design competition from Hippodice is a nice thing which maybe will help me to get something published.

For me it feels like it's mainly dependent on luck. Looking at the game market I see so many games where I think: "Why is this game published but not my game?"
I will continue to try so I hope one day I will be successfull.
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Bastiaan Reinink
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jwarrend wrote:
For me, it's without question going from the idea to the first physical prototype. Altering prototype components isn't always a picnic either, but there's just quite a barrier to actually sitting down at the computer and making all of the cards and the board and whatnot from scratch, and then printing and cutting and sleeving and mounting and so on.


I've been making prototypes 'by hand': Simply take a bunch of white cards (working on a card game at the moment) and write on them what they need to do.

Once I've gotten to a more-or-less stable version I'll make something a bit prettier on the computer, but until that moment I actually enjoy altering the cards (even while playing).

I've also found that my playtesters love this: They come up with a good idea and I'm implementing that in front of their eyes. Maybe I should give them the option of doing it themselves? :-)
Only risk is that they might be disheartened if I -don't- immediately implement...
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