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Ashes: Rise of the Phoenixborn» Forums » General

Subject: How difficult is this game to teach a CCG noob? rss

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soak man
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I honestly have never played any CCG's since MTG about 15 years ago. That being said, I have a vested interest in PHG and the Ashes Lore and character design has caught my attention. It sounds like a very fun game with characters and decks you can get attached to.

My partner, however, has never played any sort of CCG and is willing to try just about anything, but he does not have the intuitive nature of a long-playing gamer/board gamer. He is likely going to be my most consistent adversary however since the majority of our friends do not game at all.

I've already ordered the game, but how difficult do you think it will be to teach someone who has no CCG foundation?

We did try the Call of Cthulhu FFG LCG, and while he had fun, we found the gameplay pretty stale and haven't bothered with expanding our set.

Any advice or tips for teaching a new player without souring the experience? I bought the base set, and I was also wondering if there are any match-ups we should avoid while learning? We don't get into fights over games, but particularly vulnerable match-ups could ruin the first impression of the game for us.

Thank you much for any advice you have! Hoping to love the game, and spread the word.
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This was the first CCG-like game I've played (unless you count a few rounds of Hearthstone) and I think it's fairly easy to learn... although I'm also not very good yet I'll let more knowledgeable people give more tips, but as a newbie, I'd suggest:

1) stick to pre-constructed decks until he gets really comfortable with it; I think deckbuilding is where the disparity in experience will really show
2) while I haven't had a chance to try all the Phoenixborn yet, I'd say for a first game it might be good for him to use Coal, as I've found he's the most straightforward to use
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Paul Newsham
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I think it's fairly easy to teach, and the rulebook is well written. There's a bit of iconography to learn, but there are clear reference cards to help with this.

Maeoni vs Aradel is a good starting match, and you should give Aradel to the less experienced player. She wins in a fairly "obvious" way i.e. by flooding the board with creatures.

I also think that the turn structure makes Ashes quite friendly to new players. CCGs tend to have the problem of "ok it's your turn, now I sit here while you smack me in the face for a while". Ashes breaks this into alternating actions, and so gives a greater feeling of control.

Also, it's a very welcoming game in terms of having cool characters, beautiful art, and lovely chunky dice.
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Daniel King
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I don't think the rules are too difficult to follow, but I did play a few CCG's so my opinion might be biased in that respect a bit. I would recommend watching Rodney Smith's Watch it played. He does an excellent job of showing the rules. That combined with one read through of the rulebook should be sufficient.

As for bad matchups with the pre-constructed decks, I think most new players feel like Aradel's deck is pretty strong. So if one of you tends to be better at these sort of games, maybe the other can play Aradel to balance it a little bit. Noah's deck is generally regarded as one of the weakest pre-constructed decks.

I hope you enjoy the game. It's quickly become one of my favorites.
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Donny Behne
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It may actually be easier for him since he doesn't have expectations of how MTG works. Combat in Ashes is MTG-like but with some pretty pronounced differences (notably the attack a unit action). I've had MTG players take a little longer to grasp the concept because it's so similar yet different.
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Skaak
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As others have said, it's deckbuilding where you will start to hit the real disparities in skill/interest. My wife has barely played any CCGs (since a single game of MtG maybe 7-10 years ago that left a bad impression, the only one I've been able to interest her in is Android: Netrunner; surprisingly, I even got her to deck-build for that game, although she refuses to play as anything other than the Runner), but she was willing to try multiple games of Ashes (it hasn't really taken, but my young kids are partially to blame; none of the games we've tried recently have really taken because we just don't have time enough to play enough games that they start to click). It's a mechanically very simple game, and the quick reference + dice references are excellent.

Aradel vs. Maeoni is also my favorite starting matchup, but you can't really go wrong as long as you avoid Saria and Jessa (and as others have noted, Noah is really weak/difficult to play; if you really want to tilt things in your partner's favor that first game, play his Aradel to your Noah). The reason I recommend against Saria and Jessa is that both of their decks focus on disrupting their opponent's decks from functioning. That can be fun, but only once you're both invested in the game (and know enough about your favorite deck that you can adjust your strategy on the fly to combat Saria/Jessa shenanigans); otherwise it's just really frustrating to play against (Saria in particular can really drag games out longer than they need to go, since she's so focused on decking her opponent).
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Thanks for the advice guys! I've always liked indirectly dealing with my opponents and am very interested in messing around with Saria... that being said, I'll withhold using her for a while until we get a feel for the game. And if she's too frustrating to go up against for my partner, I'll probably have to seek out a new friend devil. It's hard for me to resist match/strategy/deck manipulation shenanigans.

Thanks for the pointers!

Question: Is there a reference available with the game to reconstruct the pre-constructed decks in case we end up trying deck building in the future?

Also, how long do you think purely pre-constructed deck matches will entertain us? I know there are some variables in the die-rolling, but decks with single-strategies HAVE become stale for me fairly quickly in the past.

With the Cthulhu FFG LCG this was a barrier for our fun. It also didn't help that the Hastur deck was severely crippled by anything else that had terror icons... I thought it was an awful idea to make terror useless against opponents who also had terror icons. What's the point of creating a deck type/playstyle that revolves around a mechanic that 99% of the time will be countered without even trying to do so...shake
 
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Skaak
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soakman wrote:
Question: Is there a reference available with the game to reconstruct the pre-constructed decks in case we end up trying deck building in the future?


Yep, there's a lovely two-page spread in the manual with this info. Plus the vast majority of the cards for a given preconstructed either feature the Phoenixborn themselves in the artwork, or have very similar color schemes. You don't have to play very many games before you can put together the precons without needing the lists.

soakman wrote:
Also, how long do you think purely pre-constructed deck matches will entertain us? I know there are some variables in the die-rolling, but decks with single-strategies HAVE become stale for me fairly quickly in the past.


You should get at least 2-4 games minimum out of any given precon matchup (assuming you play both sides of the matchup at least once, and play a couple games with that setup if you like the Phoenixborn), and there are 15 possible matchups. Granted, some Phoenxiborn will likely leave one or the other of you flat, but that should be balanced out by the ones you really like a lot and return to more often.

Additionally, if you set a goal to play all of the precons at least once (regardless of whether both players play each Phoenixborn) it is entirely possible that your partner might start thinking about deck tweaking, if not outright deckbuilding, when they return to their favorite Phoenixborn (encourage this! There are some matchups where cards in one precon are absolutely useless against another, but swapping them for cards from a third precon would obviously improve the deck. Also encourage mixing up the dice ratios, even if you don't change the cards; several of the precons are pretty badly hurt by having balanced dice, and just switching to 6 of one type and 4 of the other can make a big difference).

Since Ashes decks are relatively small (the precons each have only 10 unique cards, so you literally have half your deck in your First Five), it's really easy to get into deckbuilding, even if it starts out simply as swapping a few cards in and out of the precons.

There are some precon matchups that are not going to be very fair (Aradel or Coal vs. Noah are both super brutal, for instance), but if you run into one of those you've got an excellent opportunity to push deckbuilding since you can often drastically change how the underperforming deck behaves simply by swapping out a single Ready spell or by adding some new Units. I don't think any of the matchups is a complete rock-paper-scissors setup like the one you described in CoC.
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Mike
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Game is easy to teach and learn.
 
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Steven Albano
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This is a very simple CCG to teach.

During your "turn" you can only do up to two things, so that is very very simple. And the things you can do are even further split into two different types of actions. And the only the thing that is complex is attacking and blocking.

Ashes is possibly the simplest CCG I've ever come across.
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Thomas Grogan
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The rules are pretty straight forward and easy to follow. I never played MtG and actually stayed away from it as a kid since it was a rabbit hole of a money pit.
As a non MtG CCG player, I found this LCG game to be very enjoyable. PHG has a deck builder on their site where people all over the world has logged in their decks that they're currently playing.
I would suggest sticking to the recon decks until you get a feel for the dynamics of the game and what each card can do.
Then go to the aforementioned PHG deck site and build some decks using other peoples decks.
Then start to tweak those decks to suit your own style and strategy. You'll be building decks before your know it and with the first 2 expansion decks coming out in April it will only become more diverse and exciting from there.
This is a great game and a fantastic time to get in on the "ground floor" before every other tom dick and harry wants one.
Enjoy yourself!

-Tomaisin
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Andrii Chabykin
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Mike1977 wrote:
Game is easy to teach and learn.


This is not true. This game has lots of mechanics that are out of basic rules scope. Numerous times me and my wife argued about how things should work/happen.

For example, battle advantage says you inflict your damage first. What the heck does this mean? Why would I make a conclusion that a unit has to be destroyed before it can inflict it's damage to a unit with battle advantage?

Last game: two mist spirits with massive growth attack my Phoenixborn, I have one living doll with undying heart and redirect spell with appropriate die.
Question: what happens?

AGoT 2nd edition has clear rules, decent rule book and much better variability.
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Skaak
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Chabster wrote:
For example, battle advantage says you inflict your damage first. What the heck does this mean? Why would I make a conclusion that a unit has to be destroyed before it can inflict it's damage to a unit with battle advantage?


Damage resolution is the one area they really flubbed it in the rules, IMO. You have to read the FAQ really understand how the timing functions, and once multiple damage resolutions start getting nested things get complicated fast (mix practically any of Jessa's default units with a Hammer Knight and watch the headaches begin...).

Chabster wrote:
Last game: two mist spirits with massive growth attack my Phoenixborn, I have one living doll with undying heart and redirect spell with appropriate die.
Question: what happens?


This is pretty straight-forward, and mostly covered by the core rules. You leave both Mist Spirits unblocked. When the first Mist Spirit deals damage to your Phoenixborn, you Redirect it onto your Living Doll, then trigger its ability to deal 5 damage to the remaining Mist Spirit. The Mist Spirit that has not dealt damage yet dies, your Living Doll dies, and you come out of the encounter not having lost any life.

Alternately if you blocked with the Living Doll, you do the same thing except you don't have to spend a Redirect if your opponent is foolish and chooses to have the blocked Mist Spirit deal its damage first.

The only part of this that isn't explicitly defined by the rules/cards is that a creature who is killed midway through an attack against a Phoenixborn cannot deal its damage. However, it's implied by this on page 7:

"One at a time, in an order of your [the attacking player's] choosing, resolve each attacking unit's damage".

Of course, this relies on the assumption that if a unit is destroyed prior to dealing damage, then it cannot deal damage (because it doesn't exist anymore). They address this sort of scenario in the FAQ, thankfully, on page 1:

"If a card has left play before that card’s effect would resolve, even if the card’s effect has already been triggered, the effect does not resolve."

I agree that a FAQ shouldn't be required to figure out damage resolution, and what happens if a creature is killed midway through combat shouldn't require an assumption on the part of the player, but I'd hardly call this "lots of mechanics that are out of basic rules scope."

Chabster wrote:
AGoT 2nd edition has clear rules, decent rule book and much better variability.


This is one of the places where it's incredibly obvious that FFG has been running tournament-quality games for years, while Plaid Hat is just starting to try to edge into the space. The recent LCGs have really nailed the rulebooks.
 
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Andrii Chabykin
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Skaak wrote:

Chabster wrote:
Last game: two mist spirits with massive growth attack my Phoenixborn, I have one living doll with undying heart and redirect spell with appropriate die.
Question: what happens?


This is pretty straight-forward, ...


I'd say this is not straight-forward, not one bit . Hadn't you (and me) read the late-late long awaited FAQ, you could have made too many assumptions about what could have happened in my case.

Living Doll vs Hammer Knight example from FAQ doesn't make sense to me.
If an effect places wound tokens, the steps are resolved in order starting at step 2. Why would you continue process steps for Living Doll only? Are there separate destruction processes for Living Doll and Hammer Knight? If yes - they are resolved in some order and one unit always dies first. How come this unit can inflict damage if it is already destroyed. If no - what exactly 'damage and destruction resolution process' is? I just can't make out all this in terms of human logic.

 
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I have no idea what either of you guys are talking about, haha. Guess I will have to read the rules and watch the videos fairly thoroughly. I get the gist of the question, but effect/damage resolution sounds pretty unintuitive.

In most games it's just who played what first, was it blocked or redirected? No? Do your damage. It sounds like this is not the case for Ashes and changes depending how and when units die or are blocked/prevented.

Hmm. Ok. well I'll read the rules. Does anyone have any information on where I can find this updated FAQ? It sounds like I might need it.
 
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soakman wrote:
I have no idea what either of you guys are talking about, haha. Guess I will have to read the rules and watch the videos fairly thoroughly. I get the gist of the question, but effect/damage resolution sounds pretty unintuitive.

In most games it's just who played what first, was it blocked or redirected? No? Do your damage. It sounds like this is not the case for Ashes and changes depending how and when units die or are blocked/prevented.

Hmm. Ok. well I'll read the rules. Does anyone have any information on where I can find this updated FAQ? It sounds like I might need it.


Here's a link to the FAQ.

http://www.plaidhatgames.com/images/games/ashes/faq.pdf
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Skaak
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Chabster wrote:
I just can't make out all this in terms of human logic.


Honestly, this might be the problem. Game logic is firmly in control here; human logic need not apply.

Chabster wrote:
If an effect places wound tokens, the steps are resolved in order starting at step 2. Why would you continue process steps for Living Doll only?


You seem to be talking about a different scenario (are you looking at the Hammer Knight example in the FAQ)? According to your original scenario (two pumped Mist Spirits and a Living Doll), Living Doll's behavior is described on its card.

Living Doll reads: "Whenever this unit receives damage, you may spend 1 BASIC to inflict X amount of damage to a target unit or Phoenixborn. X = damage received or this unit's life value, whichever is less."

Redirect reads: "You may play this spell when your Phoenixborn would take damage and you have at least 1 unit you control in play. Do not deal that damage to your Phoenixborn. Instead deal that damage to a target unit you control."

So: the Mist Spirit deals damage to your Phoenixborn via an attack, which allows you to play Redirect. The Redirect transfers the damage to the Living Doll, which allows the Living Doll to trigger its ability and kill the other Mist Spirit.

Hammer Knight and Living Doll is a separate issue; the distinction to watch out for here is "dealing damage" vs. "placing wounds". When "placing wounds" directly as the result of a card effect, Living Doll's ability cannot be triggered.

soakman wrote:
I have no idea what either of you guys are talking about, haha. Guess I will have to read the rules and watch the videos fairly thoroughly. I get the gist of the question, but effect/damage resolution sounds pretty unintuitive.

In most games it's just who played what first, was it blocked or redirected? No? Do your damage. It sounds like this is not the case for Ashes and changes depending how and when units die or are blocked/prevented.


Damage is Ashes is not terribly complicated (or wouldn't have been, if they hadn't failed to define a specific set of steps for damage resolution in the core rules). Where people get tripped up (including Chabster's quandary) is how to handle things that trigger off of damage and how to handle multiple effects that respond to the same trigger.

Okay, I'm clearly going to expose my programmer roots here, but the thing to remember is that Ashes is procedural: that is, everything follows a strict set of steps, and if something interrupts those steps you completely resolve the interruption before continuing on with the original process. If for any reason the original steps can no longer be completed as a result of the interruption, you cease trying and move onto the next thing.

My advice with the FAQ is to read the first page (which is where damage resolution is strictly defined), and leave the rest for if you run into questions.
 
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Andrii Chabykin
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They should have just added damage tokens. That could make things simple.
 
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So, my first games were NOT against my partner as he was unavailable to play this weekend. Instead, I played a friend of mine that has more CCG experience.

We ran into a few snags that left him very frustrated though he really like the mechanics of the game.

Our first game, he chose Noah (even though I said I heard he was on the weaker side and/or difficult to use), while I tried out Maeoni.

I won while taking not a single damage to my phoenixborn. Maeoni's Refresh and Transfer Spells easily deal with Noah's exhaustion mechanics, and his fragile wolves and illusions became quick fodder for my Gilders to feed Maeoni's snakes [NOTE: I now know that the illusion trigger would occur before anything that would destroy the illusion and therefore would not feed snakes. Even so, this would have only prevented one status token in our match]. In short, it seemed like an EXTREMELY unbalanced match-up once my spellboard filled up a tiny bit. We both acknowledged it was probably just a bad match-up and moved on.

Next, he took Coal and I decided to take on the more complicated Jessa since I know I won't play her very often with my partner until he has a better grasp on these kinds of games. Now, I don't know if I was missing something vital here, or if this is again a problematic match-up. It was a closer match, but I STILL won pretty handily.

My friend felt relatively unable to do much against my Living Doll with the Undying Heart alteration, because ultimately he was just hurting himself and Coal has a lower health pool than Jessa, so this wasn't something he couldn't afford to do (My friend was pretty annoyed that Coal was a grizzled pirate and seems to have the least life value of the phonixborn). Coal seems to lack direct damage options, and as Jessa could place cursed puppets into his battlefield, his side-action (which fuel his Phoenixborn's ability) were spent disposing of puppets. On the two occasions my friend managed to get an Iron Rhino into play, I simply feared it away with a main action and dealt damage by using Jessa's phoenixborn ability.

Am I missing something? My friend likes the game, but the paper/rock/scissors construction of the pre-constructed decks seem to make the match-up almost nearly no-brainers.

It was VERY frustrating for my friend, but reading some of the statements above, I think maybe I was missing something about triggering abilities and fatal damage that may have made him feel like he had a bit more in the way of available options.

Can someone let me know what it is you think we may have missed?

I DID just notice that you can only play ONE reaction spell per turn, which I think we overlooked. That may have given me an advantage on a round somewhere as Jessa seems to have a lot comparatively.

Thoughts? Thanks. I really want to love this game. It's got all the sweet mechanics and personality I want, but I'm feeling like all you have to do to win is wait for your opponent to pick a deck FIRST and then just pick its counter.... snore
 
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I'm not surprised that Maeoni crushed it. Her deck is relatively easy to run, while Noah is in my opinion the weakest of the precons ... just about any game with him has the potential to feel lopsided.

He can win some match ups, but the player needs to play a certain way (rush, basically ignoring the control elements in the deck) and play well.

Ironically, I think his best chance against Maeoni is with a focused Small Sacrifice to keep Snakes exhausted. But this contradicts what I just said about focusing on rush and Maeoni still has ready tech (Refresh and Transfer) and even Golden Veil to counter it. It's just a very bad match up for him.

Jessa vs Coal is more interesting.

While Jessa can throw up a formidable wall with the Living Doll plus Undying Heart, her deck is expensive. In contrast, minus the Rhinos, Coal is relatively efficient. I think efficiency is the key.

Protect would be very good for Coal, while pinging Dolls to death requires Jessa to pour a lot of dice into the Pain Link effect. This means Anchornauts and Chant of Revenge are key, in addition to Coal's Slash power ... don't be afraid to pitch an Anchornaut for Slash and then bring it back with a Ceremonial power dice.
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DreadFool wrote:
I'm not surprised that Maeoni crushed it. Her deck is relatively easy to run, while Noah is in my opinion the weakest of the precons ... just about any game with him has the potential to feel lopsided.

He can win some match ups, but the player needs to play a certain way (rush, basically ignoring the control elements in the deck) and play well.

Ironically, I think his best chance against Maeoni is with a focused Small Sacrifice to keep Snakes exhausted. But this contradicts what I just said about focusing on rush and Maeoni still has ready tech (Refresh and Transfer) and even Golden Veil to counter it. It's just a very bad match up for him.

Jessa vs Coal is more interesting.

While Jessa can throw up a formidable wall with the Living Doll plus Undying Heart, her deck is expensive. In contrast, minus the Rhinos, Coal is relatively efficient. I think efficiency is the key.

Protect would be very good for Coal, while pinging Dolls to death requires Jessa to pour a lot of dice into the Pain Link effect. This means Anchornauts and Chant of Revenge are key, in addition to Coal's Slash power ... don't be afraid to pitch an Anchornaut for Slash and then bring it back with a Ceremonial power dice.


Very good advice. I'm hoping Coal has some use in him still. My friend is pretty convinced that he underperforms compared to the rest of the PB. We're noobs though and, tbh, haven't even used them all yet. Hoping I can wrangle him back into the game.
 
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soakman wrote:
Very good advice. I'm hoping Coal has some use in him still. My friend is pretty convinced that he underperforms compared to the rest of the PB. We're noobs though and, tbh, haven't even used them all yet. Hoping I can wrangle him back into the game.


Coal can be devastating, but with him even more than some of the others the timing is really tricky. Iron Rhinos in particular are dangerous to newcomers because they're so seductive ("look at this huge creature!"), but their cost is so prohibitively high that you often cannot do much more than summon an Iron Rhino during your turn (and if your opponent is able to shut it down or counter it right away, then you're at a resource deficit for that turn, which will continue to hurt you down the road). They're almost better unsummoned as a bluff; one notable game against my wife as Coal she succeeded in filling up her board with a bunch of seemingly harmless Anchornauts because I kept reserving my counters for the Iron Rhino that never materialized (and those Anchornauts then proceeded to destroy me; I never did get a chance to deal with them because the nastier units just kept coming).

Coal can actually be pretty nasty vs. Aradel or Noah. Those Anchornauts can one-shot just about everything other than the Jaguars in the early game, and they're a freebie for reclaiming with the Ceremonial dice power. Plus if a Jaguar is causing him grief, Coal can simply slough a couple cards and kill it off. And if Coal manages to get a Hammer Knight in play and keep it alive, things can get out of hand for his opponent fast.
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Skaak wrote:
soakman wrote:
Very good advice. I'm hoping Coal has some use in him still. My friend is pretty convinced that he underperforms compared to the rest of the PB. We're noobs though and, tbh, haven't even used them all yet. Hoping I can wrangle him back into the game.


Coal can be devastating, but with him even more than some of the others the timing is really tricky. Iron Rhinos in particular are dangerous to newcomers because they're so seductive ("look at this huge creature!"), but their cost is so prohibitively high that you often cannot do much more than summon an Iron Rhino during your turn (and if your opponent is able to shut it down or counter it right away, then you're at a resource deficit for that turn, which will continue to hurt you down the road). They're almost better unsummoned as a bluff; one notable game against my wife as Coal she succeeded in filling up her board with a bunch of seemingly harmless Anchornauts because I kept reserving my counters for the Iron Rhino that never materialized (and those Anchornauts then proceeded to destroy me; I never did get a chance to deal with them because the nastier units just kept coming).

Coal can actually be pretty nasty vs. Aradel or Noah. Those Anchornauts can one-shot just about everything other than the Jaguars in the early game, and they're a freebie for reclaiming with the Ceremonial dice power. Plus if a Jaguar is causing him grief, Coal can simply slough a couple cards and kill it off. And if Coal manages to get a Hammer Knight in play and keep it alive, things can get out of hand for his opponent fast.


Skaak beat me to the punch, but I agree with the points made.

Coal can also be quite good against Saria, because he has the tools to counter Ravens and has enough juice to get the job done before before decking.

I rate Coal at the top of the middle at worst in terms of the precon decks.

There are key cards in almost every deck and they change depending on the match up. The more your friend plays, the better he will do with Coal (or any other PB).
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DreadFool wrote:
Skaak wrote:
soakman wrote:
Very good advice. I'm hoping Coal has some use in him still. My friend is pretty convinced that he underperforms compared to the rest of the PB. We're noobs though and, tbh, haven't even used them all yet. Hoping I can wrangle him back into the game.


Coal can be devastating, but with him even more than some of the others the timing is really tricky. Iron Rhinos in particular are dangerous to newcomers because they're so seductive ("look at this huge creature!"), but their cost is so prohibitively high that you often cannot do much more than summon an Iron Rhino during your turn (and if your opponent is able to shut it down or counter it right away, then you're at a resource deficit for that turn, which will continue to hurt you down the road). They're almost better unsummoned as a bluff; one notable game against my wife as Coal she succeeded in filling up her board with a bunch of seemingly harmless Anchornauts because I kept reserving my counters for the Iron Rhino that never materialized (and those Anchornauts then proceeded to destroy me; I never did get a chance to deal with them because the nastier units just kept coming).

Coal can actually be pretty nasty vs. Aradel or Noah. Those Anchornauts can one-shot just about everything other than the Jaguars in the early game, and they're a freebie for reclaiming with the Ceremonial dice power. Plus if a Jaguar is causing him grief, Coal can simply slough a couple cards and kill it off. And if Coal manages to get a Hammer Knight in play and keep it alive, things can get out of hand for his opponent fast.


Skaak beat me to the punch, but I agree with the points made.

Coal can also be quite good against Saria, because he has the tools to counter Ravens and has enough juice to get the job done before before decking.

I rate Coal at the top of the middle at worst in terms of the precon decks.

There are key cards in almost every deck and they change depending on the match up. The more your friend plays, the better he will do with Coal (or any other PB).


I also got Dimona for free with my set. Any thoughts on an easy way for her to have her own deck? I was thinking she could use Noah's deck quite effectively perhaps since she seems to counter exhaustion.

Thanks again. I think maybe my friend just would like to have more control over his deck. He really dislikes hard counters, and it seems like the pre-cons almost insist that there are few other options than to counter-pick.
 
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Luke Ariel
Canada
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I believe there is a pre-con deck listed for Dimona on the site, but she uses cards from Saria, Noah, Coal, and I believe Jessa. You'd have to gut nearly all of the rest of your decks to construct it.
 
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