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Subject: I don't like Ticket to Ride. Would I like an 18xx game? rss

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I'm a fan of big heavy Euros like Madeira or Kanban but I do not generally like track laying games like Trains or TtR.
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Dave Eisen
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That in no way would prevent you from enjoying 18xx games.
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Ron
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Comparing Ticket to Ride to 18xx is like comparing Risk to World in Flames ...

There is combat in Risk and WiF, and there is track laying in TtR and 18xx. But that concludes the similarities. If you enjoy heavy Euros, I'd say you don't mind a luckless highly cutthroat and competitive game.

So my bet is on "Yes, you'll like it" meeple
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Igor Kaplounenko
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I'd say that not liking Ticket to Ride is a good first step!
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Eric Brosius
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I like both, but they don't have very much in common from a decision-making standpoint.
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Jose Smith
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You might want to consider Age of Steam or Russian Railroads before trying to push into 18XX. That is unless you have a local group that can walk you through a teaching game.
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Chester
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I doubt there is any correlation between people's preferences with the two game styles. Almost no common experience in the game playing.

I think sometimes folks play 18xx and realize they like heavy games, but that there is a limit. Others find a new niche genre to love.
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Lawcomic
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This is like saying you hate Candy Land and wondering if that means you'd like Arkham Horror.

There is no comparing the games at all.
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Joel Gabelman
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Besides agreeing with what the other have wrote - the two games are nothing alike - you WILL hate 18xx if you don't have a good group to learn from (or at least have a LESS than enjoyable time).

A nice progression into seeing if 18xx might be something you'll enjoy:

1) Play Chicago Express or American Rails to get a LITLTE flavor of stock manipulation & dilution. If you like these, go to #2.

2) Age of Steam, Steam or one of the other Wallace Pick-up & Deliver games. This will give you a sense of route building, cutting people off and building up your train engine.

3) If you liked the above, I think you'll be better suited to liking 18xx.

Some good intro 18xx games:

1857, Poseidon and Steam over Holland (though I've not played Steam over Holland).

I would also seriously consider going to GMT to P-500 1846, a WONDERFUL 18xx game that's great for beginners AND experienced players.

Best of luck!

Oh - and lastly, if you DO play with newer players, use poker chips instead of paper money.
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Lutz
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randian wrote:
I'm a fan of big heavy Euros like Madeira or Kanban but I do not generally like track laying games like Trains or TtR.


Depending on the specific 18xx you are playing, 1/2 of the game is running your company which is route building (track laying), managing resources (train buying). However, it's not the main point of most of the games, it's a means to an end, which is, being worth the most money at the end of the game.

You might want to start with a PBEM game of 1830 first to see how you like it.
 
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Roel van der Hoorn
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elmsley4 wrote:
Some good intro 18xx games:

1857, Poseidon and Steam over Holland


Maybe you mean 1879? If you find 1857 a good intro 18xx, you may as well recommend 1830: Railways & Robber Barons.
 
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Ben Draper
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RvdH83 wrote:
Maybe you mean 1879? If you find 1857 a good intro 18xx, you may as well recommend 1830: Railways & Robber Barons.


1857 is about 2/3 as long as 1830. So, I can see it working well as an intro game. That said, I agree that 1879 is a superior intro game.
 
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Forrest & Ryan Driskel
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For what's it is worth, I'm not that into the Age of Steam type games, but love 18xx.
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Bruce Murphy
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Noting that the AoS family really doesn't deserve the description 'pick-up-and-deliver'. Network-building, yes.

B>
 
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Mark G.
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randian wrote:
I'm a fan of big heavy Euros like Madeira or Kanban but I do not generally like track laying games like Trains or TtR.


It's hard to tell. I didn't care for Kanban, but I love 18xx.

I would never suggest TtR with my local group of gamers, but I enjoy playing it with my mother.

There is direct "conflict" in 18xx since you are operating on a shared map (aggressive track laying, token (station) placement, stock manipulation, etc.). Some Euro fans don't like this kind of game, some do. In many Euro games, you are building in your own sandbox, and others can't knock down your castle.
 
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Russell InGA
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(I am going to talk primarily to 1830 since this is available and tends to be recommended as a good starting point since it doesn't heap exceptions and new stuff on top of the core system.)

First, 1830 specifically and many of the 18xx family are LONG!

A first play of 1830 with all newbies may run eight or ten hours!

Second, in 1830 track laying is no more than half the game (and really in my opinion much less than half). The track laying is actually pretty cool since you can lay in switch tracks that are not present in Age of Steam (et al).

The game is about the interactions between companies buying trains (which rusts other trains) and then having companies (and possibly Presidents) have to figure out how to get a new train.

The actions of the companies (paying dividends) influences its stock price. Players have some ability to manipulate the stock prices.

Third, there can be a lot of collateral damage. I might be trying to hurt the leader by rusting a train, but someone who is in last place ends up buying a Diesel train from his personal money (his victory points!). If you are going to be offended when the weak guy gets hurt unexpectedly you are not going to like 1830.



 
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Chris Shaffer
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One of the main reasons games with new players can last too long is because they don't buy enough trains - thus, they don't push the game timer.
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