Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 Hide
11 Posts

Wir sind das Volk!» Forums » General

Subject: What are the chances that my wife would enjoy this game? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
False Maria
Canada
Ottawa
Ontario
flag msg tools
Someone suggested this game to me when I asked for recommendations for smaller footprint games. Instantly I was intrigued by the theme and the mechanics of the game (though I don't know the rules extensively since I've just read up on it a bit and watched one review video).

I was a bit disappointed when I saw the average weight of this game clocking in at 3.1, mostly because I was now assuming this game might be too much heavy for my wife to enjoy.

Here's a few bullet points about my wife as a gamer...

- She has a degree in political science, which leads me to think she may enjoy the theme a lot.

- She greatly enjoys Pandemic, often incorporating expansions from On The Brink. She plays this with ease and we have a lot of fun with it.

- Conversely, a game such as Elder Sign really irks her because there are so many icons and pieces of information on the cards, that she finds it too confusing to play. I mention this game because the average weight of it on BGG is not as high as Pandemic, so I don't know if it's weight she's thrown off by, or just excessive icons and symbols to constantly track.

- The games we mostly play at home are Gateways. Carcassone, Alhambra, Splendor, Ticket to Ride Marklin Edition, Catan Card Game. The reason why we're playing these mostly is because they're the games we acquired when initially getting into board games. Yes, most of these are much lighter than Win sind das Volk!, but now that we've mastered Pandemic, I wonder if this game isn't quite out of reach for us.

Thoughts?
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It sounds like a step up in complexity (and iconography) and (perhaps just as importantly, though you didn't mention it) playing time.

But as usual the rules are downloadable, so you can easily take a look yourself to see what you think.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Maarten D. de Jong
Netherlands
Zaandam
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
First off the bat: don't pay attention to the weight number as it says very little beyond being a more or less logical amalgam between rule book length and game play length. (That said, the at the time of writing last analysis to attempt to put the number on a more sound footing found hints that beyond a playing time of ~90 minutes the weight offset suddenly shifts by 0.5. Since you're comparing to games having shorter playing times than 90 minutes WsdV! would 'actually' have a weight of 3.6 by your usual reckoning.)

The subject matter would be a direct hit, of course; in terms of duration and intensity of play WsdV! would be nothing like you've played to date. The all-important comparison phase, where the strong and weak points of both states are, well, compared, is elaborate, and will take a few games at least before becoming internalised, and then probably another few more just to be able to play for or against specific steps. This is simply not an easy game to get into, in various ways.

Now I also believe that with sufficient enthusiasm from the student and patience from the teacher any game can be played successfully. So with that in mind my advice would be to look for a video which covers the basics fairly rapidly, and have your wife judge for herself. Only snag is that such a video doesn't really seem to exist... which is likely to be its own answer to your question.

So, ultimate answer: at this moment in time I do not believe your wife will enjoy the game. She might do so, however, once she has gained more experience with considerably more complex and more involved titles than she is used to.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe Macfarland

Arnold
Maryland
msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
In some ways the game is quite simple and direct: build infrastructure, use the increased infrastructure to improve living standards, with improved living standards you reduce unrest and remove protests. If you have four protests, you lose: keep your own unrest down and try to force protests on your opponent. You have to learn a few icons on the cards, but the icons are finite and clear (it's not like learning Race for the Galaxy, which I do love). The game always seems to play faster than I'm expecting.

In my first few plays, however, I did make rules mistakes in some cases or I only gradually learned some of the rules subtleties. A small example, the conditions for laying down a new living standard token are different for the conditions for maintaining living standards. Some of the end of decade processes are brilliant but arcane: I love how the "western currency" track works, but I always have to re-explain it to my opponent (to my wife, my daughter, even to my son, who reliably beats me). There are a lot of subtleties connected with the asymmetrical game play--these make the game fascinating, but also more complex.

You should try it. I think the deciding factor is your wife's education in political science: there is a ton of historical flavor in the game. Do you roll out the Soviet tanks? Build up the Stasi? Educate more socialists? Or focus on your economy, and try to keep pace with the west? It is worth the gamble.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bitchy Little Boy
Romania
Bucharest
Sector 3
flag msg tools
... or I won't bear with you!
badge
Phil Eklund's games are like a bar of gold from a complete stranger.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The rulebook is not a manual. It is complete and accurate, but not intuitive and it is easy to miss a tiny exception or qualification. Also, you should download the latest rules from the official site. There are a few small, but important changes and the language is clearer than in my printed edition.

Make sure you understand the rules and all their quirks perfectly yourself. I misunderstood or failed to notice a few rules in my first two games. Getting to recognise the stronger events will also help you teach your wife the game.

Since only two cards per decade are hidden in each player's hand, you will find it easy to explain the details (icons and their impact, strategic options etc.) as you play, during a first training game. Therefore you can focus on the main rules and victory conditions in your introductory explanations. Also, if she is not used with longer games you can simply interrupt the game at the end of a decade and resume it later, even on another day.

The basic rules are not difficult and almost everything in the game is open information. Also, to me, it feels as aggressive as a tennis game between a very strong but rather limited player (FRG) and a much weaker, but very technical one (GDR).

If your wife is indeed interested in the German Cold War politics, if you teach her smoothly, and if she can withstand the tension of this game for its entire duration, it is quite likely she will enjoy it.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Christian K
msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It is a tough call. The game is certainly a large step up in playing time and complexity. The game is also icon driven (though there are not many and they are pretty easy).

I think you could give it a shot. She might enjoy a game which has more of a theme than say alhambra. There is of course a chance that she doesn't enjoy it, so if that would be really upsetting to you, maybe you should not.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Benji
Switzerland
Gurmels
FR
flag msg tools
visit us on www.muwins.ch
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Muemmelmann wrote:
It is a tough call. The game is certainly a large step up in playing time and complexity. The game is also icon driven (though there are not many and they are pretty easy).

I think you could give it a shot. She might enjoy a game which has more of a theme than say alhambra. There is of course a chance that she doesn't enjoy it, so if that would be really upsetting to you, maybe you should not.


I don't think the icons would be a problem. All but one of them (used on a single card) are obvious once they were explained, and since almost all cards are open information, their potential effects can be freely discussed among the players. The game is actually quite simple, apart from the end of decade procedure. You need to know what will happen then for everything to make sense, but usually, this becomes clear after one or two runthroughs. All in all, I still agree that it is a step up in complexity from "usual" german games (and two in fun - but that is my personal opinion...).

On a side note: to everyone who loves this game, i hope you took a long look at GMTs COIN series...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
At the risk of pointing out the obvious:
surely it would be more reliable to ask her directly if a longer more complex game about 4 decades of German history would be interesting to her, rather than having a bunch of strangers on the internet speculate as to whether its political/historical theme would interest her or not.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
False Maria
Canada
Ottawa
Ontario
flag msg tools
russ wrote:
At the risk of pointing out the obvious:
surely it would be more reliable to ask her directly if a longer more complex game about 4 decades of German history would be interesting to her, rather than having a bunch of strangers on the internet speculate as to whether its political/historical theme would interest her or not. :)


Well, yes, I do intend to ask her. But since I haven't played the game myself, it might be hard to get an accurate response from her. I think how you put it might be the perfect way to do it. :)

I'll be reading the rules today to see if I think she'll enjoy it. My mom is also into board games, so I might be able to have a play partner with her if not my wife.

Thanks for the feedback guys.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jez Dedman
United Kingdom
Portsmouth
Hampshire
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
False Maria wrote:
I'll be reading the rules today to see if I think she'll enjoy it. My mom is also into board games, so I might be able to have a play partner with her if not my wife.

Thanks for the feedback guys.


Wow, I could have opened this thread myself, I recently was on the fence about purchasing the game and playing with my wife, who plays less board games than your wife.

I took the plunge and purchased a few weeks ago, probably only days before you started this thread. I have now played through a few games by myself to learn the rules, just had a read through these forums and think I have it all pinned down now (not the tactics though!). I hope she will be up for a game this weekend.

She has really only played Ticket to Ride and Love Letter previously, but loves the East/West German conflict, and is a history teacher, so I am hoping the theme will keep her interested in this. From having played it myself however now, I think I may have a challenge on my hands...

Did you ever get round to playing a game with your wife at all?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
False Maria
Canada
Ottawa
Ontario
flag msg tools
Well, looks like my mom is interested in playing it. I think my wife would give it a go if I'm familiar with the rules. As long as I can get some plays out of it to make it worth the purchase.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.