Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
3 Posts

Sluff Off!» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Session Report rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Greg Schloesser
United States
Jefferson City
TN
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
DIE SIEBEN SIEGEL

When I first heard about Die Sieben Siegel (The Seven Seals), my first thought was “Does the world really need another trick-taking game?” My initial answer was “No, it doesn’t.” However, I had the opportunity to play the game during the Spiele Faire and was so impressed that I purchased a copy the next morning. So what changed my mind?

Well, first and foremost, this is a standard trick taking game. Players must follow the lead card, if possible. The high card of the lead suit takes the trick. There is a “trump” suit and it never changes – it is always red. Play continues until each player has played all of their cards.

So what is the twist? Each player must predict exactly how many tricks they will take … in EACH suit. When making these predictions, players take a number of tokens (seals) in each suit matching their predictions. There are a limited number of seals in each color. If the supply of a particular suit is exhausted when a player must take one, he then takes one from another player, giving that player a “wild” token in its place. The player may use this token to satisfy a trick of any color, but it imposes a heavier penalty if the player is stuck with the token at the end of a hand.

Each time a player takes a trick, he surrenders a token of the suit he just took … provided he has one. The idea is to take the exact number of tricks in the exact suits that you predicted, thereby allowing you to discard all of the tokens you took during the prediction round. This will give the player a perfect score of zero points. Any tokens remaining in a player’s possession following a hand score negative points for that player as follows:

Normal suit token: - 2 points
Black “saboteur” tokens: -3 points
Wild tokens: -4 points

A player may predict that he will take no tricks during a hand. In that case, he takes the “Saboteur” token and four special seals. Every time an opponent takes a trick that he didn’t predict, the saboteur player surrenders one of his special tokens. Like regular seals, the idea is to get rid of all of these tokens, thereby scoring perfect zero points.

The main difference in this game is the predictions. There are tough choices to be made when predicting the number of tricks you will take … and tough considerations. Considering the predictions made by your opponents will give you an idea of the type of hand they possess, as well as the likelihood of you being able to accomplish your predictions. This certainly will influence how you play your hand of cards. You also must be wary in making predictions that will force you to give your opponents “wild” seals as these are easier to fulfill. Lots to think about!

This prediction element elevates Die Sieben Siegel to the upper tier of trick-taking games. It is loads of fun to play and very, very challenging. If you don’t like trick-taking games, you won’t enjoy this one. If, however, you tend to enjoy the genre, it is worth taking a good look at this latest Steffan Dorra offering. I was pleasantly surprised to learn that the world actually does have room for another trick-taking game!

After two rounds of nearly nailing my predictions, I lost control in rounds 3 and 4, falling out of contention. Steve fell behind in the first two rounds, but scored a perfect zero points in rounds 3 and 4, holding off Jason to claim the victory.

Round-by-round scores:

Steve: 3 + 3 + 0 + 0 + 4 = 10
Jason: 3 + 2 + 5 + 0 + 4 = 14
Michael: 5 + 2 + 4 + 6 + 0 = 17
Greg: 2 + 0 + 10 + 6 + 2 = 20
Jim: 12 + 3 + 3 + 5 + 5 = 28

Ratings: Steve 8.5, Michael 8, Jason 8, Greg 7.5, Jim 7.5
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Roger Breitenstein
United States
Cupertino
California
flag msg tools
mbmb
Re:Session Report
gschloesser wrote:
DIE SIEBEN SIEGEL

...

A player may predict that he will take no tricks during a hand. In that case, he takes the “Saboteur” token and four special seals. Every time an opponent takes a trick that he didn’t predict, the saboteur player surrenders one of his special tokens. Like regular seals, the idea is to get rid of all of these tokens, thereby scoring perfect zero points.

...


I understand the saboteur to be a bit different than you describe. If it is your turn to predict and nobody has yet taken the saboteur figure, you may take it instead of 0 or more prediction seals. You are not thereby predicting that you will take 0 tricks.

You start the round with -4 points, but every time someone has to take a black seal for winning a trick but being unable to surrender an appropriate white or colored seal, you get a point (up to 4 maximum for perfect 0 score). You as the saboteur may win tricks with impunity. Whether you should try to force the other players to take black seals or to gobble the tricks up to leave them with unredeemed seals is an interesting choice.

So alternatively, you could take the saboteur and four black seals during the prediction, then hand the seals out to players who need them until you (hopefully) run out during the round. After that, the other players take them from stock as before. At the end of the round, you score -1 points for each black seal you have left, and the other players score -3 apiece for theirs.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Akke Monasso
Netherlands
Aalten
Achterhoek
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmb
Re:Session Report
Roger is completely right about how the saboteur works.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.