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Subject: Any purpose to alternating point colors? rss

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Eriek Douraan
Mexico
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Hi, is there any purpose to having alternating point colors on a backgammon board?
 
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Darin Bolyard
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Certainly makes knowing your available destinations almost immediately obvious.
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Crazy Adam
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Not that I know of. To my best knowledge, it's simply a decorative element. In the first half of the 2nd millennium CE, there are quite a few examples of backgammon boards that use a monochromatic color scheme for the points. As wood inlay became more popular, the trend turned to alternating colors, especially in the 1700s. Boards since then have pretty much been all two-coloured. There are also examples of points which use the same color but two different patterns are employed to create the points.
 
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ARTHUR REILLY
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Pickles2000 wrote:
Hi, is there any purpose to having alternating point colors on a backgammon board?


Yes there is a reason. As someone has already stated, it does make it easier to find your destination. Simply put, if you're playing on a board with red and black points, when ever you roll an even number, you will always be traveling to the same color as the point your moving from. Roll an odd number, and you'll be moving to the opposite color from the color of the point your moving from. Game wouldn't be as much fun to actually play, without this system in place.

Arthur
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Moshe Callen
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freechinanow wrote:
Not that I know of. To my best knowledge, it's simply a decorative element. In the first half of the 2nd millennium CE, there are quite a few examples of backgammon boards that use a monochromatic color scheme for the points. As wood inlay became more popular, the trend turned to alternating colors, especially in the 1700s. Boards since then have pretty much been all two-coloured. There are also examples of points which use the same color but two different patterns are employed to create the points.

Monochrome boards are still common in the Middle East where the game is extremely commonly played.
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As with checkers on a chessboard, the pattern makes it slightly easier to visualize, but is not strictly necessary to enjoy the game.
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