Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 Hide
9 Posts

Go» Forums » Variants

Subject: Hexagonal Go? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Bruce Baskir
United States
Missouri
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Any reason why Go couldn't be played on a hexagonal board? Play would still be on the intersections, but each stone would only have three neighbors, not four. Can anyone see obvious major changes in game play?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff Thompson
United States
Homewood
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sure, everything.

But don't let that stop you. Give it a try. It could be interesting, or it could be terrible.

One thing, no more empty triangles!

...

Now that I start thinking about it the whole thing would be very strange. I think finding a living shape would require a lot more stones. Also invading would be nearly impossible because escape would be very difficult.

Still, give it a try and let us know how it went. Perhaps the Go Congress has used this during the strange go variants tournament they have every year.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kurt Rauscher
United States
Herndon
Virginia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Sure, although it would certainly change a few things, it'd be interesting to see how it plays out. How wide were you looking at? Maybe you could try out the center hexagon of a chinese checkers board? Or even the whole chinese checkers board for a really odd shape?

Reminds me of a circular go board I saw before where every intersection had 4 liberties, as if you were playing on a sphere.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Bazynski
Poland
warsaw
mazowieckie
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I've played a few games on hex boards as well as triangular boards a couple of years ago... both seemed a lot more shallow... there are a lot simpler abstract strategies than go, triangGo or hexGo seem much more like games of that class
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Billy McBoatface
United States
Lexington
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
KGS is the #1 web site for playing go over the internet. Visit now!
badge
Yes, I really am that awesome.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The rules of go can be applied to any arbitrary network. People have done lots of fiddling with different "boards", including crystal lattices, street maps, hex grids, etc.

Some alternate boards are fun. None yet seem to have matched a square grid for depth of play. It is possible that this is because nobody has played enough games on alternate boards to see the depth, but I'm guessing that if there were a much better board out there, it would have been found by now!

But don't let that stop you. I've played alternate boards and it can be really fun because so many of your old go reflexes don't work any more, it feels like you're learning the principles all over again!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Howe
United States
Cromwell
Connecticut
flag msg tools
Go on the intersections of a hexagonal tesselation has been tried. It is hard to keep groups alive because of the reduced number of liberties, so a version called "Rosette" adds the rule that a ring of 6 stones in a hexagonal shape is permanently alive, as are any stones connected to it. It is described in Schmittberger's book "New Rules for Classic Games".
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
I played go on various grids, including hexagonal, and even a 3-dimensional wire grid, for many years during Crazy Go night at the US Go Congress. Other variations are also played, e.g. playing two stones on your turn instead of one (note that it matters if you consider the stones played simultaneously or one after the other); multiplayer go (note that it matters if your score is defined to have your prisoners lost subtracted, or enemy prisoners captured by you added, unlike in 2-player go); blind go; go with random elements e.g. from card draws; etc etc etc.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brendan Tracey
United States
Unspecified
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
How did the card drawing variant work?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
howeman wrote:
How did the card drawing variant work?


It's been several years since I played it, but my recollection is that the cards had pictures of different configurations of several stones (e.g. 5 stones in a plus sign, 4 stones in a 2x2 square, etc). Those determined a pattern of stones you had to play on your turn; all "target spaces" had to be empty, but you could of course capture stones as a result of placing your group of stones (simultaneously). I don't recall whether:

1. on your turn you simply drew a card and played according to the card

or

2. on your turn you had a choice of playing a single stone as usual or drawing a card to play

or some other system. I think it was #2. I also don't recall if there was a single deck we both drew from, or if each player had their own (identical) set of cards; I think the latter. I think the creator called it "Joker Go" or some such.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.