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Subject: The Gods War: Spelling error in the title? rss

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Claus Appel
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What does the title The Gods War mean? Does it mean "the war of the gods"? If so, are you (Petersen Games) aware that it is misspelled? The correct spelling would be "The Gods' War" (with an apostrophe).

"The Gods War", as it is spelled, is a sentence that means "the gods are warring", "the gods wage war". Is that what you mean? I doubt it, since the trailer video includes the text "The Gods War is upon us", which makes no sense with this interpretation.

Is this intentional? If not, I recommend that you fix it before launching the Kickstarter.
 
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Tor Iver Wilhelmsen
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I can also mean "The war about the gods". Kind of like how "the Opium War" did not involve the opium fighting...
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Claus Appel
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JadedGamer wrote:
I can also mean "The war about the gods". Kind of like how "the Opium War" did not involve the opium fighting...

I argue that you can't make compounds with plurals like that. It would have to be "God War", "Godwar" or "Godswar".
 
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I actually noted this to. It could make sense in the context of the gods currently war (with each other). But it seems fairly obvious that it should have been possessive "s" so Gods'
 
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Shadow ruxer
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It makes sense to me, as you were saying, it technically means that the war of gods is happening among us. I don't think there is a spelling error and I don't like the sound of the gods' war.
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Alex Hobbit
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SpectrumDT wrote:
What does the title The Gods War mean? Does it mean "the war of the gods"? If so, are you (Petersen Games) aware that it is misspelled? The correct spelling would be "The Gods' War" (with an apostrophe).


https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/164702/glorantha-gods-wa...

Seems the apo is right there.
 
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S. R.
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You forget that "war" can be a verb.
That way, it can be a description of what the gods do...
It might be uncommon, nowadays, but grammatically, it is a valid construction...
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JH
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As above, it can be a verb. Read "Glorantha: The Gods War" like you would "Glorantha: The Gods Clash." It's not their war, it's what they're doing.
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Graham Robinson
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Gods War is a description. It is a time period , like world war. It is a mythic event.

Also note that American usage often omits apostrophes where British usage would have one. Such as veterans day.

Cheers, Graham
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Arthur Petersen
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SpectrumDT wrote:
What does the title The Gods War mean? Does it mean "the war of the gods"? If so, are you (Petersen Games) aware that it is misspelled? The correct spelling would be "The Gods' War" (with an apostrophe).

"The Gods War", as it is spelled, is a sentence that means "the gods are warring", "the gods wage war". Is that what you mean? I doubt it, since the trailer video includes the text "The Gods War is upon us", which makes no sense with this interpretation.

Is this intentional? If not, I recommend that you fix it before launching the Kickstarter.


Not so fast, grammar nazi

I be a former high school English teacher afore I am working at Petersen Games.

"The Gods War" could be appropriate with OR without the apostrophe, actually (with slightly different meanings). And, because it looks better aesthetically without one, we usually don't include it. Plus, it's more accurate for what we actually want - to turn the plural noun "Gods" into an adjective, not a possessive.

The paragraphs below probably explain better than I can, and come from this link:
http://data.grammarbook.com/blog/effective-writing/apostroph...

In English, nouns become adjectives all the time: a computer’s malfunction is also called a computer malfunction. One of Shakespeare’s plays is a Shakespeare play.

Consider the sentence Beverly Hills’ weather is mild. Like computer’s and Shakespeare’s in the previous paragraph, Beverly Hills’ is a possessive noun. But we could turn it into an adjective by removing the apostrophe: Beverly Hills weather is mild. Same with Abe Jones’s campaign is picking up steam—we could also say The Abe Jones campaign is picking up steam.

Few would argue with the apostrophe in The Beatles’ place in pop music history is assured. But how would you write this sentence: There are still countless Beatles/Beatles’ fans out there. Although many would choose Beatles’ fans, it should be Beatles fans—no apostrophe—because the sentence has turned Beatles into an adjective modifying fans rather than a possessive noun.

There are times when the distinction is trivial. There is no significant difference between General Motors cars are selling and General Motors’ cars are selling. But if you were to write We visited the General Motors’ plant in Wentzville, you’d be using a possessive noun where only an adjective should go.

Notice that the four examples above involve the nouns Hills, Jones, Beatles, and Motors. Nouns ending in s can tempt rushed or distracted writers to add a possessive apostrophe for no good reason. Many writers, including most journalists, add only an apostrophe to show possession when a proper noun ends in s. On a bad day, this can result in silly phrases like a Texas’ barbecue joint, a Sally Hawkins’ movie, or even the St. Regis’ Hotel, in which the apostrophes are indefensible.

Those who write such things would never dream of writing a Chicago’s barbecue joint, a George Clooney’s movie, or the Fairmont’s Hotel.

So whenever writers are of a mind to add a possessive apostrophe to a noun ending in s, they might first try swapping that word with one that ends in a different letter. If the result is nonsense, they’ll have ample time to revise the sentence and save themselves some embarrassment.


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Sandy Petersen
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I spell it "Gods War" because that is how it has always been spelled in Gloranthan lore.

I neither defend its grammar, nor decry it.
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Niko
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John Blank wrote:
Now lets tackle this, "irregardless" problem.
It's grammatically incorrect... yadda yadda... but language is fluent and changes... yadda yadda... But "regardless" already means the same thing...yadda yadda... some dictionaries include it now... yadda yadda...

There summed it up for you

I'd rather address what this thread is doing in the CW forum instead of the God War's one
 
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JH
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It's not just wrong, it's antonymic. Irregardless would mean the opposite of regardless (for comparison, irreducible means not reducible; irregardless would mean not regardless, which would mean having regard).
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Arthur Petersen
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Sarcasmorator wrote:
It's not just wrong, it's antonymic. Irregardless would mean the opposite of regardless (for comparison, irreducible means not reducible; irregardless would mean not regardless, which would mean having regard).


Yes, that is technically correct. However, actual usage ultimately determines actual meaning in the English language.

To bring this back to Lovecraft*, he occasionally used the word "enormity" in his stories, for its original meaning of "horrible crime" or "super serious" or something similar to that. But, because it sounds like the noun for "enormous," the dictionary has since added the definition of "bigness" to "enormity." But Lovecraft wasn't trying to say the GOOs were physically large (though they might have been big as well)!

So, "enormity" has added new meaning that used to not be there, due to usage.

*hey, CW, right? What is this Gods War thread doing on CW forums?
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JH
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I will never budge on "irregardless" or "could care less," common usage aside, dictionary or not! Gotta draw the line somewhere, and antonymic common usage is my line.
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Max Maloney
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Sarcasmorator wrote:
I will never budge on "irregardless" or "could care less," common usage aside, dictionary or not! Gotta draw the line somewhere, and antonymic common usage is my line.

For my father, his line in the sand was always "for free." It's a super-common construction that should simply be written with the word "free."
 
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Arthur Petersen
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Dormammu wrote:
Sarcasmorator wrote:
I will never budge on "irregardless" or "could care less," common usage aside, dictionary or not! Gotta draw the line somewhere, and antonymic common usage is my line.

For my father, his line in the sand was always "for free." It's a super-common construction that should simply be written with the word "free."


I had an English prof. at university who always said to never write the word "just" in your communications, because it is meaningless.

One of my biggest pet peeves as an English teacher myself was when a 9th grader wrote "could of" or "would of" instead of "could have" or "would have" yuk
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J P
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Sarcasmorator wrote:
It's not just wrong, it's antonymic. Irregardless would mean the opposite of regardless (for comparison, irreducible means not reducible; irregardless would mean not regardless, which would mean having regard).



And yet, "inflammable" means "flammable."

"What a country!" - Dr. Nick
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Kevin Brown
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Sarcasmorator wrote:
I will never budge on "irregardless" or "could care less," common usage aside, dictionary or not! Gotta draw the line somewhere, and antonymic common usage is my line.


The handy thing about irregardless is that it's a quick way to separate the wheat from the chaff. I'm all for irregardless. It lets me know more about who I'm talking to. Same for "I could care less." Don't make an issue, just adjust word choice and move ahead with the conversation.
 
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JH
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(I should note here that I'm a professional copy editor so I possibly put more weight on this issue than average)
 
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Claus Appel
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Dumon wrote:
SpectrumDT wrote:
"The Gods War", as it is spelled, is a sentence that means "the gods are warring", "the gods wage war". Is that what you mean? I doubt it, since the trailer video includes the text "The Gods War is upon us", which makes no sense with this interpretation.


You forget that "war" can be a verb.
That way, it can be a description of what the gods do...
It might be uncommon, nowadays, but grammatically, it is a valid construction...

No. I didn't forget it. I explicitly mentioned that.
 
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Ken B.
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Here's a question. Why do the phrases "hardly" and "not hardly" seem to mean exactly the same thing?


"You excited for that party?"

"Hardly."



"You excited for that party?"

"Not hardly."
 
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Arthur Petersen
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franklincobb wrote:
Here's a question. Why do the phrases "hardly" and "not hardly" seem to mean exactly the same thing?


"You excited for that party?"

"Hardly."



"You excited for that party?"

"Not hardly."


hmm, I'm not so sure I've really heard people say "not hardly" very much, so I don't get this experience.

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Martin Gallo
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I am pretty close to just giving up on grammar. Ever since "like" started being used as a connector rather than a simile it all became clear to me that people are stupid. Proper or appropriate grammar has probably been in decline for far longer than that timeframe but the accelerated acceptance of slang and lazy speaking has become the norm. I hate it. Then came leet-speak and texting and I saw that the end may have already come and gone.

I have enjoyed this discussion. Good to know that some people are paying attention, be they right or wrong! whistle

The Gods War is a fine title. I look forward to hopefully being able to afford it.
 
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Ken B.
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existoid wrote:
franklincobb wrote:
Here's a question. Why do the phrases "hardly" and "not hardly" seem to mean exactly the same thing?


"You excited for that party?"

"Hardly."



"You excited for that party?"

"Not hardly."


hmm, I'm not so sure I've really heard people say "not hardly" very much, so I don't get this experience.




Could be a southern thing, I've heard it pretty often.

"You a big New York Yankees fan?"

"Not hardly."

 
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