Recommend
83 
 Thumb up
 Hide
19 Posts

Scythe» Forums » Reviews

Subject: A playground with nothing but seesaws — a different take on Scythe rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Kevin Garnica
United States
West Covina
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
SCYTHE

1-5 Player
115 Minutes
By Jamey Stegmaier


This review will be in two parts. The first part is about my initial impressions after one play. The second part is an informal “review” of the game in the form of afterthoughts from my play group.

PART I: First play impressions

Introduction:

Scythe is a lovely design, obviously, from a visual standpoint. I’m sure no one doubts that. But what struck me as particularly fascinating is the way the game rests on fulcrums and hinges. This will not be a review of the rules; I will assume you have a basic understanding of how the game is played. Instead, I want to highlight some of these “seesaw” effect that the game seems to be exploring, exploiting, expanding our understanding of, and exterminating any preconceived notions about design choices and mechanics. Did I mention Scythe is a 4X game, of sorts?

Seesaw #1: money/points
In Scythe, the winner is the player with the most money. Throughout the game, you will spend some money, and you will earn some money. But money equals points! It’s a one to one ratio. So, it’s important to understand how many points you’re willing to give, I mean spend, in order to do certain actions vs. how much money, I mean points, you can earn through other different actions. And since the endgame scoring is vast and difficult to calculate quickly, there is always a tacit, light tension in how you handle your income.

The whole money = points, points = money thing is a neat balancing act. It’s two opposite ends of the same concept. And as the game unfolds, the amount will sway up and down, like two kids playing on the seesaw. I’m sure Scythe isn’t the first game to feature this idea, but it certainly implements it to great effect.

Seesaw #2: upgrades
The upgrade action is an ingenious piece of design, it’s my personal favorite part of the player’s action board. When upgrading, you remove any cube from a green space on the top-row of actions and place it (covering) on any red space of the bottom-row actions. Red spaces indicate cost, while green spaces indicate gain. What this means is that for each cube you move, you are increasing your gain in one area while simultaneously decreasing your cost in another area. That is simply brilliant.

This is not a linear concept, it’s one idea folded in half. With a simple, non-fiddly movement of a single wooden cube you have affected two different actions on your player board, and both are improvements. The rough economic equivalent is tantamount to “buying low & selling high”. This seesaw effect between getting more and paying less is what everyone wants in life. Scythe gives players that gratifying feeling of getting ahead in this downtrodden, fictional world.

Seesaw #3: the action boards
Getting broader for a moment, the action boards as a whole utilize this back and forth notion. in general, the top-row actions have much to do with the procuring of resources and workers, and the bottom-row actions have everything to do with how those resources are spent, all while the resulting effects have to do with where your workers are on the board at that moment. This feature isn’t as clear cut as the previous two points, but it’s still worth noting how the top- and bottom- row actions are inextricably linked to each other. Let’s take a look more closely…

Top-row actions allow players to produce resources, get more workers, or trade resources. Each of the four resources (food, wood, oil, metal) correlates to a specific bottom-row action, which is also tied in thematically as well:

Food is needed to feed more recruits as you enlist help; the more people rally for your cause, the more mouths there are to feed, right? In a way, it’s as though the players themselves are banding together; every time you or one of your neighbors takes a certain bottom-row action, you get the enlist perk if you’ve unlocked it.

If you want to construct buildings, you need wood. Where do you place the buildings? On hexes where you have workers, duh. Buildings don’t construct themselves.

Since oil makes the world go round, it seems logical that oil is spent for technological upgrades. The abstraction that nothing is necessarily made means that it doesn’t have to do with where your workers are on the board, you simply move that cube I was talking about, and voila! You’re benefit is twofold.

Finally, if you want to deploy a mech, you need what else…metal. Again, a mech doesn’t make itself, so it must be deployed on a hex where you have workers.

There are other, smaller instances where this dual nature of commodities to outcome can be seen. For example, the last top-row action (“bolster”) has to do with gearing up for battle, either in power or with combat cards; a kind of arms race, if you will. However, if you have built the Armory, you will also gain popularity. Thematically, the people will see you less as a warmonger, and more of a leader who has a healthy view of it’s own defense capabilities. You will become more respected (or feared) by other factions and won’t be messed with easily. The notion between being powerful yet knowing restraint is something we can understand. Or perhaps you want to be a savage nation with people who are raging against the other factions and don’t mind your arms buildup and they support your popularity in that regard. Either way…

Seesaw #4: power vs. popularity
While we’re on the subject, let’s take a look at those tracks on the board. Players can go up and down on the power track, and the popularity track. This seesaw is more thematic than mechanical. Obviously, these two tracks are an abstract representation of the two extremes of man’s nature. And nowhere in the game is this thematic integration more apparent than in the encounter cards.

For the most part, the top option of the cards has players gaining various resources, but almost always gaining at least 1 (if not more) popularity. The middle action doesn’t concern itself with this seesaw. But the bottom action always has a player paying popularity for a tempting worthwhile boost on your turn. And the descriptive labelings of each action reflect the granularity of ulterior motives on the part of the character having the encounter. The progression from top to bottom is one of a gradual decline in quality of character. The implication here is that the better the benefit, the more you turn into a jerk in the process. Noble action choices gain you popularity, and selfish actions (while very lucrative) take away popularity, ultimately decreasing your score at the end of the game.

Some cards even grant the player power and combat cards. This swaying of moral character is a tiny part of the game play in comparison to the overall design, but it’s worth noting. Great care and thought has gone into the encounter cards to reflect this dual nature through these tracks.

Seesaw #5: combat
While fighting in Scythe may be scarce, there are a couple of interesting points regarding this idea of the seesaw effect when it comes to combat. First, the procedure for combat involves the power dial and combat cards. This proverbial “two-pronged” fork functions as a metaphorical weapon as much as it does a design choice that gives players more control. The power dial is directly tied to the power track, while combat cards are separate, individual one-time bonuses. This means that players can set their combat dial to zero, while going big with combat cards if they have them. They have potentially to win the battle, and still maintain whatever power they had prior. These two elements allow players more leeway when deciding how to enter a fight.

Secondly, the other point has to do with the actual outcome of battle, or at least the first two for the purposes of placing stars out on the board. Right now, I am going to make a completely “duh” statement: when you lose a battle, the other player places a star on the board. I know this, and you know this. But the statement is said from the other side of the seesaw. When a battle occurs, everyone wants to be the winner, and that’s appropriate to think. But when framed the way I just did, it nuances the weight of the outcome a little differently. You didn’t simply lose the battle, but your opponent also just got one step closer to winning. It plays into the whole of the game. Entering combat is huge and there are no take-backsies. One way or the other, someone is going to place a star, and you just hope to god it’s you. This tension is especially acute when an opponent enters your hex a turn sooner than you had planned. The gravitas of this tug-of-war is significant.

Seriously, just think about it, it’s different. When you enter combat, yes you want to win. But if you don’t, not only do you lose, but you also inevitably push your opponent closer to overall victory.

Seesaw #6: fluidity of game play
The last seesaw I want to briefly mention is a paradoxical one. Scythe is a game that has a plethora of options presented at the start of the game, everything is wide open. There is a huge sense of freedom in playing Scythe. Everything has forward momentum, and setbacks are never permanent or devastating. At worst, they can be nuisances that sting for a turn or two. Otherwise, the mechanics leave a lot of room for personal discovery within the game space.

And yet, as a direct result of that, the game therefore allows players to control their very fate. Every action they choose has an immediate and intentional effect, swift and direct. The players are masters of their own destinies. There is much freedom in controlling how you play. Freedom and control. Those are two concepts that initially seem contradictory. But they are actually the Yin and Yang that make the game work as smoothly as it does.

First conclusion:
Clearly, there are many ways to skin this cat, but I hope talking about these finer balancing points helps shed a different light onto the game. Scythe has been hyped over a long gestation period, so it’s easy to feel let down or underwhelmed when it finally arrives onto the gaming scene. It's sort of like imagining what your favorite celebrity is like, then when you spend a day with them you realize they're just regular people. I fear Scythe has suffered a bit from this phenomenon.

But when you stop to observe, I mean really observe what’s at work here, the game is a beautiful structure of spectrums and pendulums that swing from one end to the other, either conceptually, literally, mechanically, thematically, figuratively. Sometimes they criss-cross with each other, other times they remain distinctly separate.

I’m sure there are other seesaws I haven’t touched upon, or even entirely different ways to admire the game design. One person sees math, efficiencies, and optimization; another sees pillars and beams and arches; still another sees history, culture, and other social sciences.

I find it endlessly fascinating to try to understand things looking through different lenses. Personally, I’m infatuated with the design for these reasons. Scythe is a three-dimensional game that functions on multiple levels, from the small to the grand. In this respect, the game is a big achievement.



——— ——— ———



PART II: Thoughts about the game and the experience

Introduction:
We played my KS copy once (so far), 4P. It took us 2 hrs & change to play, not including rules explanation. Keep in mind this was the first play for all of us, so what follows are our knee-jerk reactions. But, for those who value first impressions (they are important, after all), hopefully this will be useful information.

Quick Comparisons:
To better help where to place this game, we all discussed afterwards how Scythe sits along other games in its class. It is part Euro, part Ameritrash, so what better frame of reference than to compare it to more recent popular titles that have come out. It was compared to Terra Mystica, Dominant Species, Trickerion, Blood Rage, Kemet, (and to a lesser extent) Cyclades. Here are the afterthoughts of this little scrappy yet humble group of game lovers:

Mike (winner): likes the game better than Terra Mystica, and places the feeling of game play in a similar space as Trickerion (a game he owns and enjoys). He thought the mechanics were absolutely solid and fun, more euro than not. After playing, he wishes he had backed the KS when he saw it (especially for the price), but didn’t jump on the hype bandwagon. Now he will purchase the basic game and would be happy with that just to own a copy. Mike was very impressed with the quality of components that come with the game, even at it’s most basic retail level.

Marisa (2nd place): likes the game better than Terra Mystica, and she likes Terra Mystica. But she wouldn’t teach it to just anybody. She believes Blood Rage is still more accessible towards non-gamers, but Scythe works well for those more familiar with modern board gaming. She would only play Scythe with her fewer, more “hardcore” gaming friends. Marisa was utterly captivated and smitten by the world of the game and the artwork. She poured over the art book afterwards (I KS the Art Connoisseur Collector’s Edition), finding the juxtaposition of peasant farm life and mechs to be wildly creative and stimulating.

Caleb (3rd place): really enjoyed the game. He likened the brain-burn to Dominant Species, and drew similarities to the army buildup in Cyclades, but thinks its a better game than Cyclades. He also thought it was more euro than not. Upon beginning to play, Caleb was concerned about the game length and surely thought the game would take upwards of 4 hours to play. He was pleasantly surprised when we finished in about half that time. He says it’s not the sort of game he would play everyday, just because of how much mindfulness is required to play well. He also wished there were more options with your mechs. He thought it was strange to just basically have them sitting there. He built all four mechs but didn’t have a single combat.

Kevin (caboose): True to form, yours truly had “teacher syndrome”, whereby because I taught the game, I came in last place. I liken it to Terra Mystica and Kemet (without the bloodshed). I can definitely see the influence of those games, as well as Hansa Teutonica, Eclipse and, interestingly enough — Columbia block war games, especially in the combat department. More specifically, it felt similar in the way players position themselves, the second-guessing that happens when two players are on adjacent hexes, and have to stop when entering enemy territory. But it is definitely more on the euro side of things. Beyond that, what else do I think? Well, I just wrote about it. That’s what was on my mind during the game.

Second conclusion:
So, to sum up: Scythe is a hybrid that leans more toward the euro side, is more complex than Blood Rage, but more “fun” than Terra Mystica, with a decision space similar to games like Dominant Species, and has less combat than Kemet, but more of a buildup to combat similar to Cyclades.

Scythe is a complex game, but it is not complicated. It is simple enough to learn and play, but playing well is an entirely different matter. It is certainly a medium to medium-heavy game, and has immense breadth of decision. Scythe samples a number of simple systems that simulate a similar seesaw situation (how’s that for alliteration?)

No one was for one moment bored, doing something on their phone, etc. Everyone was constantly engaged. We even overlapped turns when someone was taking a bottom-row action to ensure the pace, as is encouraged by the rules. I had a huge dinner just prior to playing, and in past situations like that — when a game doesn’t hold my interest — I tend towards a food coma. I was awake and alert the entire time.

Another review described the feeling of playing the game as being satisfying. Personally, if we’re going to go with the whole food analogy, my word choice would have to be…delicious. Playing Scythe felt delicious. The kind where you savor the “L” when saying it.

Overall, my impression is a very favorable one. Scythe is a game has a gorgeous supermodel exterior, but also has a great “personality” underneath; it is a high-end luxury sports car that also gets good gas milage; it is a summer blockbuster that actually has good acting. Whatever analogy works for you, Scythe is both parts of what you’re looking for — solid mechanics, solid game experience. Put simply, I cannot recommend this game highly enough. Bravo Jamey!
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marty Strubczewski
United States
Mechanicsburg
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wow, excellent breakdown. I like how you did comparisons to other games like "more fun than Terra Mystica" and "more complex than Blood Rage". That is quite helpful for others deciding if the game will be a good fit for them.
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Skelton
United States
Texas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sweet review! Great breakdown, and it was nice to see viewpoints from everyone that played with you.

I keep seeing over and over that people play it, like it, and then say they wouldn't necessarily play this game with their "non-gamer" friends. I'm genuinely curious, why not?

The first game of Scythe we played was with a friend of mine that had never played modern/designer board games before (to my knowledge). He was definitely intimidated at first, but after we started playing his reaction was one of "oh, that's it? I can do this!". I think the game is simple enough to teach to people that haven't played these kinds of games before, but you have to know your crowd. There are definitely some people out there that would have to "ease into" this kind of game.

I have noticed a trend with Jamey's games though...opening the box can be daunting, but two rounds into the game everyone goes "huh, this isn't as complex as I thought". We definitely had that impression with Euphoria (it scared away my mother-in-law before we even got around to reading the rules).

I would say it's a medium weight game. But that's all relative I suppose. I think Scythe would feel quite light after a game of the gallerist, panamax, or even trickerion IMO. That's definitely not a knock on Scythe, as I love the space it sits in. Easy enough that the thought of playing it doesn't hurt your brain, but complex enough that there's entertainment to be had in the decision making process each turn. I love games that take 45 minutes to get through the rules but after you're done you can explain them to someone else in 10 minutes or less.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Garnica
United States
West Covina
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
znomorph wrote:
Sweet review! Great breakdown, and it was nice to see viewpoints from everyone that played with you.

I keep seeing over and over that people play it, like it, and then say they wouldn't necessarily play this game with their "non-gamer" friends. I'm genuinely curious, why not?

The first game of Scythe we played was with a friend of mine that had never played modern/designer board games before (to my knowledge). He was definitely intimidated at first, but after we started playing his reaction was one of "oh, that's it? I can do this!". I think the game is simple enough to teach to people that haven't played these kinds of games before, but you have to know your crowd. There are definitely some people out there that would have to "ease into" this kind of game.

I have noticed a trend with Jamey's games though...opening the box can be daunting, but two rounds into the game everyone goes "huh, this isn't as complex as I thought". We definitely had that impression with Euphoria (it scared away my mother-in-law before we even got around to reading the rules).

I would say it's a medium weight game. But that's all relative I suppose. I think Scythe would feel quite light after a game of the gallerist, panamax, or even trickerion IMO. That's definitely not a knock on Scythe, as I love the space it sits in. Easy enough that the thought of playing it doesn't hurt your brain, but complex enough that there's entertainment to be had in the decision making process each turn. I love games that take 45 minutes to get through the rules but after you're done you can explain them to someone else in 10 minutes or less.


Everything you say is true. Do remember that these were just their initial reactions, and it's not necessarily how I feel about it. Obviously, YMMV.

I think it depends on the individual. Some people enjoy learning games and others don't; some people have an aptitude and a propensity towards it, while others not so much. If you know your friends, I'm sure your discretion will be accurate.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Skelton
United States
Texas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Absolutely. I didn't mean to imply that their impression was "wrong". Certainly that was my impression before I started playing. I was just curious if their comment was one made more because of the type of "non-gamers" in their (your?) social circles or if it was an impression of the game applied to that crowd in general. No offense or judgement intended .
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Garnica
United States
West Covina
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
znomorph wrote:
Absolutely. I didn't mean to imply that their impression was "wrong". Certainly that was my impression before I started playing. I was just curious if their comment was one made more because of the type of "non-gamers" in their (your?) social circles or if it was an impression of the game applied to that crowd in general. No offense or judgement intended .


Oh, none taken! cool
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Danwarr
United States
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Fantastic review and breakdown. The end game impression were especially great as is the point about seesaws. I love the games balance so far.

It remains to be seen, however, if the Rusviet Union is clearly the "best" faction. I'm glad you didn't happen to run into this with your game.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Garnica
United States
West Covina
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Nope, quite the opposite.

In winning order, the factions were: blue, yellow, white, red. Sorry, I didn't memorize faction name/color after one play yet.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
A J
United States
Riverside
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I like reviews with comparisons to other games, even if it's initial impressions. Thanks for the write-up!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Danwarr
United States
Illinois
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
pacman88k wrote:
Nope, quite the opposite.

In winning order, the factions were: blue, yellow, white, red. Sorry, I didn't memorize faction name/color after one play yet.


Blue = Nordic Kingdoms = NK = Nords
Yellow = Crimean Khanate = CK = Crimea
White = Republic of Polonia = RP = Polonia
Red = Rusviet Union = RU = Rusviet
Black = Saxony Empire = SE = Saxons

I think I covered all of my bases there.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Achilles Last Stand
United States
Minnesota
flag msg tools
mbmb
pacman88k wrote:
[b]SCYTHE

You didn’t simply lose the battle, but your opponent also just got one step closer to winning. It plays into the whole of the game. Entering combat is huge and there are no take-backsies. One way or the other, someone is going to place a star, and you just hope to god it’s you. This tension is especially acute when an opponent enters your hex a turn sooner than you had planned. The gravitas of this tug-of-war is significant.



Great review. The seesaw analogies are spot on! I'm also loving the depth of the game while really appreciating the ability to teach it easily. Anyone can jump in and play this; they might not like it but most can quickly grasp the concepts. I will strongly consider adding your concepts of seesaws in my teaching to illustrate the nuances.

The snippet I clipped from your review is in regards to the concept of placing a star being one step closer to winning. In my experience thus far, it's not been the one who places the 6th star decidedly becomes the winner. Yes, that can be the case but rushing stars can lead to an omission of other variables whereby one's final treasury might be less than desired. Territory control, resource hoarding, and seesaw #1 are not to be underestimated.


2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Garnica
United States
West Covina
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
tex_conway wrote:
pacman88k wrote:
[b]SCYTHE

You didn’t simply lose the battle, but your opponent also just got one step closer to winning. It plays into the whole of the game. Entering combat is huge and there are no take-backsies. One way or the other, someone is going to place a star, and you just hope to god it’s you. This tension is especially acute when an opponent enters your hex a turn sooner than you had planned. The gravitas of this tug-of-war is significant.



Great review. The seesaw analogies are spot on! I'm also loving the depth of the game while really appreciating the ability to teach it easily. Anyone can jump in and play this; they might not like it but most can quickly grasp the concepts. I will strongly consider adding your concepts of seesaws in my teaching to illustrate the nuances.

The snippet I clipped from your review is in regards to the concept of placing a star being one step closer to winning. In my experience thus far, it's not been the one who places the 6th star decidedly becomes the winner. Yes, that can be the case but rushing stars can lead to an omission of other variables whereby one's final treasury might be less than desired. Territory control, resource hoarding, and seesaw #1 are not to be underestimated.




Thanks for the kind words. Let me know how the teaching goes.

With regards to your thoughts on combat, I agree with you. My point wasn't so much the 6th star gets placed because of combat, but rather that just getting into combat in the first place slowly progresses the game. And that can be important depending on how many stars everyone has out.

All the other ways to place stars are solitary endeavors. Combat is the only one that pits players against each other. It makes the game feel a little more "personal" in that way. It's exciting, but noteworthy.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg
United States
Pleasant Hill
California
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
Scythe samples a number of simple systems that simulate a similar seesaw situation

I gave a thumb for this line alone.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pierce Ostrander
United States
Albuquerque
New Mexico
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
pacman88k wrote:
[b]Overall, my impression is a very favorable one. Scythe is a game has a gorgeous supermodel exterior, but also has a great “personality” underneath; it is a high-end luxury sports car that also gets good gas milage. Whatever analogy works for you, ...


That sounds like my wife.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Alexander
Australia
Canberra
ACT
flag msg tools
beef
badge
sack
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This review is fantastic, and very happy to see possibly the most objective review I've seen on Scythe so far. As a casual observer who didn't back the game it's great to finally see a review that doesn't appear to be subject to backer distortion.

Is there a way people can subscribe to reviews by a particular author?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Darrell Goodridge
United States
Windsor Locks
Connecticut
flag msg tools
Currently at 1:2 ratio, getting better every week
badge
I don't want it, I don't need it, but I can't stop myself. - Stabbing Westward
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I loved the "teacher syndrome" line. You must be like me then. For 2016, I have a 5% win rate on games that I teach for the first time. Compared to almost 50% for games that I learn for the first time.

Good to hear the different reactions. I think my group could relate to those.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Garnica
United States
West Covina
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
beefsack wrote:
This review is fantastic, and very happy to see possibly the most objective review I've seen on Scythe so far. As a casual observer who didn't back the game it's great to finally see a review that doesn't appear to be subject to backer distortion.

Is there a way people can subscribe to reviews by a particular author?


You can click "subscribe" within my profile, but you will get more than just my reviews. Otherwise, I'm not sure. Regardless, I appreciate your comment. I've gotten better with review-writing over time. I've written about 5 or 6 others recently. PM me if you'd like links, I don't want to derail this thread.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Garnica
United States
West Covina
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Cardboardjunkie wrote:
Good to hear the different reactions. I think my group could relate to those.


Personally, I find analogies and comparisons extremely helpful in life, in general! It helps put the "unknown" in a context we can understand, namely, the "known".
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mathue Faulkner
United States
Austin
TX
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
pacman88k wrote:
beefsack wrote:
This review is fantastic, and very happy to see possibly the most objective review I've seen on Scythe so far. As a casual observer who didn't back the game it's great to finally see a review that doesn't appear to be subject to backer distortion.

Is there a way people can subscribe to reviews by a particular author?


You can click "subscribe" within my profile, but you will get more than just my reviews. Otherwise, I'm not sure. Regardless, I appreciate your comment. I've gotten better with review-writing over time. I've written about 5 or 6 others recently. PM me if you'd like links, I don't want to derail this thread.

After subscribing, you can "Edit Subscriptions" and check yes on only new threads. That will weed out most of the other stuff....
3 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.