Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 Hide
6 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Board Game Design » Board Game Design

Subject: Violence in Board Games and Publishing rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Jochen Eisenhuth
Germany
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mb
Hey Geeks,

I'm currently trying to approach different German publishers to get my game published. (Game: Super Fantasy Brawl; combat game with humorous cartoon artstyle - this 1min intro video could give you an idea of the theme: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLVVQvee4xE ).

This was difficult from the beginning as most German publishers have a note for game designers on their website saying that they won't accept submissions for conflict heavy or combat orientated games.

I understand why german publishers reject ww2-themed games as that's a kind of sensitive topic. What I don't really get is the complete rejection of even fantasy or sience fiction violence of most German publishers (I'm interested how publishers of other countries handle this).

First, violence is a big part of a lot of video games, books and movies and some of them are produced in Germany, too. Second, some incredibly succesful games like Risk and Chess are conflict orientated, too.

My theory is, that (at least in Germany) board games are perceived as being more educative as let's say video games (and this is strange as it should be the content of a game/movie/book that educates rather than the medium itself).

What do you think?

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andreas Krüger
Germany
Krefeld
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
There are a lot of games on the German market with violence. Time Stories was nominated for the Kennerspiel award, Andor got the award. Some publishers just don't target the audience that would be interested, I guess.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jochen Eisenhuth
Germany
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mb
In my perception, these are rather exceptions. Some German publishers (like for example Heidelberger Spieleverlag) do a lot of localizations of games with combat themes but it's very rare that these games are first/exclusively published in Germany.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Freelance Police
United States
Palo Alto
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Can you go after American publishers? Or even KS? We love that sort of thing. laugh
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jochen Eisenhuth
Germany
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mb
I probably will, if I cannot find a German publisher. There is one German publisher playtesting at the moment, very exciting .

I'm not sure if I can handle an international KS, as dealing with international shipping and customs seems quite daunting (this is a one-man project and I'm not experienced in economics/business). There are more questions (is my artwork good enough for KS, do I need plastic minis?) etc. so KS is not really likely to happen...

Quote:
"We love that sort of thing."

The strange thing is - we love it, too. But still most publishers in Germany stay away from conflict heavy games (unless doing localizations).

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gil Hova
United States
Jersey City
New Jersey
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
German publishers have a long history of marketing to families. They want their games to be playable by both a 12-year-old kid and a 72-year-old grandparent.

Violent themes cut down on the width of that demographic, so they tend to pick more placid-seeming themes.

American publishers are more likely to market to the 18-30 demographic, who find edgy themes more appealing.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.