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Subject: Best way to get to Düsseldorf from Berlin? rss

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Garret Wehrman
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Hi BGG,

My wife and I are traveling through Europe in October and luckily we will be in Germany during the SPIEL and are making plans to attend for a day. We will be in Berlin before we travel to Düsseldorf where we will be staying during the convention. Does anyone have any recommendations on whether we should fly or take a train from the two cities? I'm very excited to attend the convention and lucky enough to have a wife that's willing to tag along. Any other general tips for a first timer would be greatly appreciated as well if you have them.
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Andi Kasper
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Just fly there. I traveled the other way around with germanwings. It is quick and not that expansive.
Or you go by train. There is a direct ICE connecton from berlin to cologne, no sure if there is one to düsseldorf aswell
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L S
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There's also a direct ICE (speed train) connection from Berlin to Düsseldorf. The ride lasts a little over four hours.

For convenience, I think that going by train is better. The trains go every hour, there's no check-in/out procedure, and most importantly you board and leave the train in the city center (whereas the airports are in the periphery, so if you go by plane, you still need to get to and from the airport).

That said, if you're flexible with your schedule, going by plane will (for absolutely no reason at all) most likely be the cheaper option.
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Lindsay Scholle
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ICE is just over four hours and as mentioned they have a lot of advantages over planes. Also very cheap if you book well in advance and book a particular train with no flexibility to change the ticket - €19 a ticket.

http://reiseauskunft.bahn.de
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Adastra
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I'd definitely recommend flying. It's much less tedious than spending hours on that train, and the airport in Düsseldorf is very quick to get to with the S-Bahn that runs directly from the terminal. Usually it's also cheaper than taking the train (unless of course you book the train WAY in advance).

Where in Düsseldorf are you staying? Let me know if you need any recommendations for things to do, restaurants, etc.
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Garret Wehrman
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raevynn wrote:
I'd definitely recommend flying. It's much less tedious than spending hours on that train, and the airport in Düsseldorf is very quick to get to with the S-Bahn that runs directly from the terminal. Usually it's also cheaper than taking the train (unless of course you book the train WAY in advance).

Where in Düsseldorf are you staying? Let me know if you need any recommendations for things to do, restaurants, etc.


Thank you, I am leaning toward flying. We are staying near the the Hbf station in Düsseldorf and would love any recommendations for places to eat or things to do. As I mentioned, earlier, our time in the city is short. We're coming in Thursday afternoon, spending the majority of Friday at the SPIEL and flying to Paris sometime on Saturday. Also, any other recommendations for Berlin and Munich would be delightful
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Adastra
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If you're staying at the B&B (which is not really that close to the Hbf), you'll be very close to the city's best Portuguese restaurants, Clube Portugues and Frango Portugues (they're owned by the same people). They are famous for their seafood, but they also have meat. For dessert, the Kekskuchen is an absolute must.

However, I would probably recommend going into the Old Town and catching a bit of culture The Old Town is full of places to go, but it's a bit of a challenge to know the good ones. I'd probably recommend going to one of the breweries there for some German food. Right on the party street are Brauerei zum Schlüssel & Zum Goldenen Kessel (Schumacher), while a little bit further north is Füchschen (which is where the locals tend to go). They all serve not only beer, but good German food. Near Füchschen is also Zur Uel, which is not a brewery but a restaurant.

All the other places I can recommend in the Old Town are mostly for quick bites, like Ristorante Arlecchino or Casita Mexicana.

Not to far from the Hbf is also our Japanese 'hood. There are lots of really good places there, such as NaNiWa, Takumi, or the all-you-can-eat restaurant Okinii. Near there is also one of Düsseldorf's best (and most overpriced) burger places, What's Beef.

And finally, my favorite place for German food is actually also in that area, which is the Schumacher Stammhaus.

I think that's plently of recommendations for now
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Garret Wehrman
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raevynn wrote:
If you're staying at the B&B (which is not really that close to the Hbf), you'll be very close to the city's best Portuguese restaurants, Clube Portugues and Frango Portugues (they're owned by the same people). They are famous for their seafood, but they also have meat. For dessert, the Kekskuchen is an absolute must.

However, I would probably recommend going into the Old Town and catching a bit of culture The Old Town is full of places to go, but it's a bit of a challenge to know the good ones. I'd probably recommend going to one of the breweries there for some German food. Right on the party street are Brauerei zum Schlüssel & Zum Goldenen Kessel (Schumacher), while a little bit further north is Füchschen (which is where the locals tend to go). They all serve not only beer, but good German food. Near Füchschen is also Zur Uel, which is not a brewery but a restaurant.

All the other places I can recommend in the Old Town are mostly for quick bites, like Ristorante Arlecchino or Casita Mexicana.

Not to far from the Hbf is also our Japanese 'hood. There are lots of really good places there, such as NaNiWa, Takumi, or the all-you-can-eat restaurant Okinii. Near there is also one of Düsseldorf's best (and most overpriced) burger places, What's Beef.

And finally, my favorite place for German food is actually also in that area, which is the Schumacher Stammhaus.

I think that's plently of recommendations for now


Thank you so much for taking the time to type all of this out, I'm sure my wife and I will put these recommendations to good use, especially the breweries. Perhaps our paths will cross and I can buy you a beer.
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Christian Gienger
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How long are you staying in each city? While I for example really love the Japanese part of Düsseldorf, I suggest you rather have some German stuff while you're there as that is what is typical to Germany. Especially alt beer is a local specialty not widely available.
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Markus A.
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Locu wrote:
[...] Especially alt beer is a local specialty not widely available.

There is a reason for that!
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Christian Gienger
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Thorin2001 wrote:
Locu wrote:
[...] Especially alt beer is a local specialty not widely available.

There is a reason for that!


It's still better than Kölsch, but I think it's a must try when in the area. Liking it is a different beast. He'll get the better beer in Munich on his trip
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Garret Wehrman
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Locu wrote:
How long are you staying in each city? While I for example really love the Japanese part of Düsseldorf, I suggest you rather have some German stuff while you're there as that is what is typical to Germany. Especially alt beer is a local specialty not widely available.


We will be in Munich, Berlin and Dusseldorf for three days each. Prior to our visit to Germany we will be in Italy and following it we will be in Paris.
 
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Christian Gienger
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Some characteristic stuff for the German cities you should try:

Berlin:
Berliner Weisse (A low alcohol beer mixed with raspberry or woodruff syrup
Döner Kebab in Kreuzberg (very international part of Berlin. If you want to buy some fresh fruit or vegetables, do that there as well. (It's basically Turkish food, but the version in the bread was invented in Berlin though some guy in Esslingen claims he did that a few months earlier)
Visit Café Klo. Don't eat before you go there and you shouldn't be too easily offended, but it's something you should visit if you're in Berlin.

München
Weissbier: Can't say which brewery as there are still wars fought over that. Drink one in the "Englischer Garten" if the weather is nice.
Weißwurstfrühstück: Have some traditional sausages for breakfast with a Brezen (Nothing to do with the stuff you have in the states and call pretzel), sweet mustard, and some Weissbier (non-alcoholic if you don't want to drink before noon).
Wiener Schnitzel, which is originally made from veal, not pork, Schweinshaxe (pork knuckle) with dumplings, and red cabbage and/or duck. I think you'll be missing Wiesn or Oktoberfest by a few days, but there's still enough beer left
 
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Adastra
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Lemem wrote:

Thank you so much for taking the time to type all of this out, I'm sure my wife and I will put these recommendations to good use, especially the breweries. Perhaps our paths will cross and I can buy you a beer.


You're welcome! However, I guess the chances of running into me in Essen are probably more likely, as I'm planning to go there on Thursday!

By the way, I just remembered that I wrote a blog post about my favorite restaurants in Düsseldorf a while back, which might help your decision.

I agree with Locu that you should definitely plan in a good German meal at one of the breweries. However, if you're here for 3 days, you might have time for one of the other places as well. (There's really no need for German food every night, it's very heavy stuff).
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Christian Gienger
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I agree that I never visit Düsseldorf without having Japanese one evening.
 
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Locu wrote:
Weißwurstfrühstück
Why do you hate him?gulp
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Christian Gienger
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Randombias wrote:
Locu wrote:
Weißwurstfrühstück
Why do you hate him?gulp


I like that stuff.
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Deb Wentworth
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Locu wrote:
Some characteristic stuff for the German cities you should try:

Berlin:
Berliner Weisse (A low alcohol beer mixed with raspberry or woodruff syrup



Are they still serving Berliner Weisse with woodruff? I thought I'd heard that woodruff was thought to be carcinogenic. I used to love Waldmeister Eis (woodruff-flavored ice cream - unheard of in the States). Can you still find that?
 
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debwentworth wrote:
Locu wrote:
Some characteristic stuff for the German cities you should try:

Berlin:
Berliner Weisse (A low alcohol beer mixed with raspberry or woodruff syrup



Are they still serving Berliner Weisse with woodruff? I thought I'd heard that woodruff was thought to be carcinogenic. I used to love Waldmeister Eis (woodruff-flavored ice cream - unheard of in the States). Can you still find that?

In Germany, woodruff is only banned in food that's consumed by kids - no woodruff lemonade, ice cream, asf. However, alcoholic beverages like Berliner Weiße may still contain (limited amounts of) woodruff.
 
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Andreas Krüger
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Randombias wrote:
debwentworth wrote:
Locu wrote:
Some characteristic stuff for the German cities you should try:

Berlin:
Berliner Weisse (A low alcohol beer mixed with raspberry or woodruff syrup



Are they still serving Berliner Weisse with woodruff? I thought I'd heard that woodruff was thought to be carcinogenic. I used to love Waldmeister Eis (woodruff-flavored ice cream - unheard of in the States). Can you still find that?

In Germany, woodruff is only banned in food that's consumed by kids - no woodruff lemonade, ice cream, asf. However, alcoholic beverages like Berliner Weiße may still contain (limited amounts of) woodruff.


I had no idea. I had a woodruff flavored popsicle a minute ago. Obviously it was not considered to be for kids :-). Or maybe the rule is only against real woodruff, and artificial flavor is okay?

The alcohol in the drink will be more dangerous for your liver than the very limited amount of woodruff.
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Martina Frohme
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As someone who spends nearly all her free time in Düsseldorf: Do have some Japanese food! Places I would suggest: Lunches at NaNaWa Noodles and More of you want a really great famous Noodle soup (the long queue is a sign of good quality!!! the place is larger than it looks and the service is fast and competent)) or Sushi at NaNiWa Sushi and More, right opposite, both on Klosterstraße right off Immermannstraße, and for dinner Kushitei of Tokyo, a Japanese grill restaurant.

Do eat pig's trotters and Sauerkraut, by all means... It's usually a fair quality. But don't think that is German cuisine. It's more of a Hollywood cliche and is therefore served to tourists on a regular basis as if it was something us Germans have every weekend. Few Germans like it much, and it is not eaten all that frequently. (Not even by Bavarians. My husband is one.)

Don't eat "Brezn" north of Nuremberg. And the good ones are those that look a bit bubbly at the surface, not the shiny smooth ones.

And - as a friend of mine who is a star chef at a prominent Düsseldorf restaurant - Wiener Schnitzel is not named after Vienna but after its creator whose last name was "Wiener" and is originally made of pork, not veal. You recognize a good quality if the breadcrumbs do not stick to the meat, but more or less lie around it like a loose blanket.

Typical of the Rhine area is e.g. "Rheinischer Sauerbraten" (sweet and sour beef roast with gravy) with potatoes (or potato dumplings) and red cabbage.

There is a market in Düsseldorf, on the Carlsplatz in the Altstadt, and there is a restaurant right on it, it's called Dauser (Josef Dausers Gulaschkanone), they have good typically German stews. Authentic.

Exellent (and the earliest) breakfasts are to be had at Bastian's, also on the Carlsplatz. Saturday mornings you can meet me there!
Have fun !
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Andreas Krüger
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Arboretum wrote:

And - as a friend of mine who is a star chef at a prominent Düsseldorf restaurant - Wiener Schnitzel is not named after Vienna but after its creator whose last name was "Wiener" and is originally made of pork, not veal.


Citation needed.
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Adastra
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Arboretum wrote:
Don't eat "Brezn" north of Nuremberg. And the good ones are those that look a bit bubbly at the surface, not the shiny smooth ones.


I disagree. There's actually a great place for pretzels right in Düsseldorf Hbf, the Brezel Bub. They make them fresh all day and when you buy them they're usually still warm and incredibly yummy.
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If you're strapped for cash, and/or used to sleeping in odd places. you could consider taking the night train. It saves you the cost of a hotel for one night, and since you spend the trip sleeping, you can spend a few more waking hours doing exciting things in Europe.

I generally prefer travelling by train, when the costs and travel time are not much higher and longer than flying. No check-in or check-out, more leg room during the trip - for me it's far more comfortable. We'll be visiting Paris early September (going by train from the Netherlands). If any things on what to do / what not to do there pop up, I'll report back afterwards :-)
(wondering if the Paris game shops are still there - it's been more than ten years since I last visited the city)

If you're in Essen/Düsseldorf just for one day, I suggest trying to stay in an Essen hotel (if you still can find a room) instead of in Düsseldorf. During Spiel, there are many hotel lobbies where Spiel visitors try out their new games in the evenings. It's usually easy to join a group, so you can extend your Spiel experience to outside the opening hours of the halls. If you meet people / join a game on Thursday, you can get tips on what to look for on Friday.
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Martina Frohme
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raevynn wrote:


Arboretum wrote:
Don't eat "Brezn" north of Nuremberg. And the good ones are those that look a bit bubbly at the surface, not the shiny smooth ones.


I disagree. There's actually a great place for pretzels right in Düsseldorf Hbf, the Brezel Bub. They make them fresh all day and when you buy them they're usually still warm and incredibly yummy.
good

I don't want to say anything against their pretzels, but I tried them. They are very nice bakery, agreed. But they are not like good Bavarian Brezn. Not saying they are bad quality or anything, not at all! Just, well, different.
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