GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters at year's end: 1000!

8,733 Supporters

$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
19 Days Left

Support:

Recommend
73 
 Thumb up
 Hide
44 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Scythe» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Mina's Not-So-Mini Review - Scythe With Two rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Mina's Not-So-Mini Review - Scythe With Two




The Overview


In Scythe, you will take on the role of one of 5 different nations struggling to gain supremacy over a desolate wasteland of war-ravaged land. At the center of this land is a city-state called the "Factory" that produced giant mechs for the purposes of fueling the war, but has since closed its doors. It nevertheless remains a valuable asset to whoever manages to gain control over it as it is still filled with powers and resources that cannot be obtained elsewhere.

Your goal in the game will be to become the richest nation by conquering land, collecting cash, controlling resources, building your structures in lucrative locations, and completing achievements that include upgrading your ability to perform actions, deploying mechs, building structures, enlisting recruits, deploying workers, completing objectives, winning combat, gaining popularity, and gaining power. The amount of money you receive for land, resources, and achievements will be determined by your popularity.



You will have two player boards; one is a faction-specific board that stores your mechs and enlistment bonuses and the other is an action board, which you will use to select your action(s) each turn. Your action board will show your starting objective cards, popularity, and coins, while your faction-specific board will show your starting power and combat cards, as well as your faction-specific ability.


All the action boards


All the faction-specific player boards


Player setup


Each action board is divided into 4 columns and each column has a top and a bottom action. Each turn, you have to move your action selection pawn to a new section of your player board and may take the top action, the bottom action, or both. The actions at the top of the board allow you to:

1. Move - You use movement points to move your leader, workers, or mechs (which can carry workers, reducing the number of movement points needed) around the board. If your leader lands on a space with an encounter token, you will draw an encounter card and take one of the options presented to gain resources, popularity, coins, or pay popularity or coins to gain some benefit.





Whenever your move action results in your leader and/or mechs sharing a territory with an opponent's character and/or mechs, combat occurs. I will describe the combat process below.

Whenever your move action results in your leader and/or mechs sharing a territory with an opponent's workers, you send those workers back to their homeland and lose 1 popularity per worker sent back.

When you move into the Factory space at the center of the board, you receive a number of Factory cards that depends on a) the number of players in the game and b) the order in which you arrived at the Factory (i.e. number of players + 1 if you are first, number of players if you are second, etc.) and select one to keep. You only do this if you move your nation's leader into the Factory. The Factory card becomes permanently attached to your action board, giving you an extra action that you may take in the future.




Sample cards that can be obtained at the Factory


The board also features tunnel spaces, which you can use to move directly between one and another.



2. Produce - You pay the costs shown (none at the start of the game because they are all covered with your workers) and produce resources using workers in the number of territories shown (2 at the start of the game). Each worker produces 1 resource and workers on villages produce more workers.



3. Trade - Pay a coin to gain resources or popularity.

4. Bolster - Pay a coin to gain power or combat cards.

And the actions at the bottom of the board allow you to:

1. Upgrade - Pay the amount of oil shown to move one of the cubes covering a bonus on a top-row action to a bottom-row action showing a resource. This simultaneously upgrades the top-row action, allowing you to gain a larger benefit when you take it, and the bottom-row action, making it cheaper to take that action. Note that any resources must always be paid from territories you control with workers, mechs, your leader, and/or your structures.

2. Deploy - Pay the amount of metal shown to deploy a mech into one of the territories you control with at least one worker. You then gain the ability shown under the mech. You can select any mech you like.

3. Build - Pay the amount of wood shown to build one of your structures in one of the territories you control with at least one worker. You will then reveal a bonus associated with that structure, which you will gain when you take the top-row action associated with that structure. For example, the monument will give you a popularity each time you take a bolster action in the future.

4. Enlist - Pay the amount of food shown to enlist new recruits, taking one of the enlistment discs off of one of the bottom-row actions and placing it on your faction-specific player board to gain an immediate bonus of coins, power, popularity, or combat cards. You will also continue to gain the benefit uncovered by the enlisted recruit every time you or ANY OTHER PLAYER takes the associated bottom-row action.

All this recruiting, deploying, and moving around is bound to end in conflict and conflict in Scythe unfolds as follows. Whenever your move action results your leader and/or mechs sharing a territory with an opponent's character and/or mechs, combat occurs. To resolve combat, both you and your opponent secretly select an amount of power you are willing to give up using your power dial and add up to one combat card for each unit in combat. You reveal your power dials simultaneously and the player with the highest total wins. Both players lose the amount of power they selected and discard any combat cards used. The winner gets to stay in the territory, adds 1 star to the achievement track, and loses 1 popularity for each of the opponent's workers in the combat. The loser has to retreat to his homeland.


Power


Combat cards


The game ends immediately when one player has placed his last achievement star on the board. You can place a star when
a) You have completed all 6 upgrades
b) You have deployed all 4 mechs
c) You have built all 4 structures
d) You have enlisted all 4 recruits
e) You have all 8 workers on the board
f) You have completed 1 objective card
g) You have won combat (up to 2x)
h) You have 18 popularity
i) You have 16 power.




Objective cards


At the end of the game, you will gain money for your placed stars, for the territories you control with your workers, mechs, leader, and/or structures, and for every two resources you control. The amount of money you gain for each of these categories will be determined by your popularity, with higher popularity leading to higher returns. You will also gain a structure bonus based on the locations of your structures.




Structure bonuses


This was not an exhaustive regurgitation of the rules, but I hope it is enough to provide a broad sense of how the game is played.

The game also has a solo variant in which automa of various difficulty are used.



The Review


Played prior to review: 13x






1. It's so beautiful and it smells like vanilla cupcakes! (SERIOUSLY! The minis smell like vanilla!)
Scythe is gorgeous. All you have to do is open the box, take one whiff of the freshly baked goodies inside, and be transported to a magical world where mechs rule and farmers bake cakes for you while you play . But not only do the minis smell great, they also look amazing! I'm not a miniatures person (I like them, but I don't seek out games just because they have cool minis), but to me, the Scythe minis appear superbly crafted. Compared to my other games with minis, they are much more solid, detailed, and yummy smelling . And the sculpts for each faction (including the leaders and mechs, as well as the wooden pieces for workers) are very different!

The other components in the game (I have the Collector's Edition) are of outstanding quality and are intricately crafted to resemble the objects they are meant to portray. The food is a little large compared to the other resources, but it's definitely pretty!

Last but not least is the artwork. I don't have to say much about this because you can see how lovely it is from the photographs, but I should note that the board actually looks a lot more pleasing and organized and a lot less like puppy barf in real life than it does in the zoomed out photographs. There are so many little details to discover in the artwork and all the various regions and terrains appear clear and distinct despite the fact that they are skillfully blended together by the artist.

2. The Scythe world is thematic and unique
Playing Scythe feels like stepping into a time machine and entering a parallel universe. In Scythe's world, mechs, farmers, and giant animals work side by side to farm the land, produce resources, build structures, and edge out their competition in a struggle for supremacy over a war-ravaged land. Of course, the artwork and miniatures strongly contribute to making this world come to life, but aspects of the actual game do so as well.

First, there are the encounter cards. The fact that they are random and that you never really know what you are going to get when you send your leader to collect one for you means that they give the game a great sense of exploration and adventure. They also make certain regions particularly attractive, as they grant special benefits to the player who gets there first, enhancing the sense of a race for domination over limited land. Additionally, the items that you do receive are always tied to a very thematic event that presents you with some thematic choices. In one encounter, you run across a group of soldiers. If you go fishing with the soldiers by posing as locals, you gain 2 food and 1 popularity. If you bribe soldiers for their mech, you pay $4 to deploy a mech. If you wait until dusk to invade the soldiers' camp, you pay 2 popularity to gain 2 food and 2 metal. I appreciate the fact that the designer/publisher put this extra bit of effort to associate each encounter card with a very specific event, as it greatly contributes to giving the game a sense of adventure and theme.

Second, you have the valuable "Factory" at the center of the board, which also holds some potentially highly valuable goodies, in addition to counting as three territories at the end of the game! And this is relevant because it leads all players to the center of the board, leading them to spread towards and race for the center.

Third, there are the variable player powers in the form of the various factions and their leaders. The leaders and player powers not only serve to make each player feel distinct from the others, but also serve to bring out the theme of this strange parallel reality. You have Polania, who appear to have tamed bears and trained them to swim from one underground lake to another, you have Saxony, who are able to intimidate their enemies with their wolves and consider wars to be great achievements, you have the Rusviet Union, who relentlessly and continuously pursue their objectives, among others.

Finally, the various actions you perform in the game make are thematically appropriate and make intuitive sense; you erect structures that cannot secure control over that territory on their own, you are moving around the map to gain control over various territories with your workers and mechs, your leader and mechs can wage wars but your farmers can't because they only have scythes and pitchforks and scythes can't beat giant mechs! These are just some of the actions you'll be performing in Scythe, but the actions you take and the objectives you are striving to achieve all feel true to the story and theme of the game. Of course, there are some thematic discrepancies, such as the fact that you are able to magically transport resources you need to build a mech in one territory from their location in another, but these discrepancies are relatively minor and work well mechanically, so they don't detract significantly from the experience.

3. A tense puzzly game of efficiency and speed
This is my favorite part! Scythe is basically a race; it is a race to place all your achievement stars on the board before your opponents and to do so as efficiently and as craftily as possible. It is also a race to gather the biggest piece of the not-so-giant pie of land available to be doled out and to be the first to reach and hold the Factory. To do this, you must create plans for the perfect order in which to execute your actions based on the unique combination of your action board's top-row and bottom-row actions and based on your faction's special ability and objective cards.

4. Highly strategic with many strategies to explore
Scythe is a strategy game. You have a number of options for placing your stars and you have to determine which ones to pursue and in which order at the very start of the game. Your selection and the manner in which you pursue your starry objectives will depend on your special power and action board, as some powers and boards are more conducive to doing things in a certain order, but you will have to narrow down your objectives and pursue them from the beginning to the end of the game.

Plus, there are a total of 9 different star objectives that you can pursue and you will only place 6 stars in any given game, so you will have to craft your strategy around a different subset of these in any given game.

4. A great sense of progress
Scythe gives you a very satisfying sense of progress, escalation, and achievement. You start the game in one corner of the world, cut off from the resources and powers available at the center of the board. Through upgrades and mech deployment, you gain extra benefits and powers that allow you to move over more terrains more efficiently and before you know it, you're producing buckets of resources and building impressive structures in a single turn!

I love the buildup in your ability to navigate and manipulate the world in Scythe and I love how this buildup creates a tremendously tense situation late in the game. It can take some time for stars to start coming out, but once you see that one player has placed 4 or so down, you can be sure you'll only have a few turns before the game is over. The game escalates that quickly! And, combined with the efficiency aspects described above, that escalation makes every decision feel incredibly important, particularly as the end of the game approaches. Once you see those stars flying, you have to hustle or be left in the dust!

5. Map works well even with only two players
Although there are no significant differences between the setup and gameplay when playing with two or with more players, Scythe works well even at the lower end of player count. The contention for territory is strong even with two players due to the ease of moving from one end of the map to the other generated by tunnels and various player powers that make movement even easier. Of course, more players would make for more contests over the tight space, but the map feels small enough even with just two parties on it.

6. Subtlety in aggression with a quick, simple, and effective combat system
I don't love wars and combat resolution. One of my biggest complaints in 4x games or games that involve combat is the time and effort it takes to resolve combat. I rarely find this process interesting; it feels more like a necessary evil. Though I would consider Scythe to be a 4x game, aggression and combat are not central elements. In fact, I would say that Extermination is the least significant of the four x in the game.

With only one exception, all factions have to lose popularity when they wage war and force their opponents' workers to retreat. The fact that popularity determines the amount of money (i.e points) you get for EVERYTHING at the end of the game means that it is a precious commodity that you want to save rather than waste by waging war every which way. Plus, you will generally try to stick workers with mechs, making waging wars on mechs costly. This deterrent to fighting, combined with the fact that Scythe is essentially a race to accumulate as much of everything as possible means that you have to pick your battles carefully.

I love this kind of contemplative aggression that necessitates arming up and keeping in line with your opponent in order to minimize possible threat, but never knowing whether and when aggression will be necessary.
Combat is super simple, tense, and takes very little time. The aggressor wins in case of a tie, so there is a slight incentive to attack rather than wait around, but the whole process is super quick and painless to resolve. All combat should be like this. Shoot up your opponent and move on with your life!

7. A tremendous amount of variability and replay value is generated by the depth of the game, as well as the multiple faction boards and action boards, the huge number of objective cards, structure bonuses, factory cards, and encounter cards, and various faction matchups
Scythe is the type of game that I could play for the rest of my life and not get bored.

First, you have a huge deck of objective cards that will give you some direction for your movement and the actions you take in the game. Of course, you can choose to ignore objectives and focus on placing your stars on other categories, but objectives tend to be relatively easy to accomplish incidentally to another action, so integrating them into your strategy can be smart. And the objective you choose to integrate into your strategy will somewhat modify your direction in the game. The huge deck of these objective cards will ensure that you don't get bored of exploring integrating these objectives into your strategies for a long time.

Second, you have multiple faction boards and action boards and many possible ways in which these can be combined. As I mentioned above, your faction/action board combination will greatly influence your strategic direction. For example, if you are playing with the Saxony Empire, you may want to capitalize on your ability to complete multiple objective cards and to place multiple stars by winning combat by focusing your efforts on gaining power and combat cards. To do this, you have to find a way to quickly upgrade actions on your action board that will allow you to upgrade mechs that will allow you to move around efficiently and reduce other players' power levels, etc.

The nature of the structure bonuses will also influence your strategic direction and there are many of these, with only one used in each game. If you the end-game structure bonus provides coins for building around lakes, you can be sure that areas around lakes will be hotly contested. Generally, the structure bonuses will influence your movement and decision regarding which stars to focus on placing and when depending on the resources you can easily accumulate around the territories on which you need to build your structures.

Factory and Encounter cards also provide a tremendous amount of game-to-game variety. Factory cards basically extend your action board, providing you with an extra action you can taken in each game. The deck of these cards is huge and you will only see at most 6 (if playing with 5 players and you are the first to get to the Factory) of these in any given game. In a 2-player game, you will only see at most 3 of these, meaning that the actions available to you in any given game will differ.

8. GIRL POWER!
Three out of the 5 characters are female! Yay! They are beautiful, powerful, and not scantily clad! THANK YOU STONEMEIER GAMES!


The Brotherhood of the Wandering Puppies


soblue


soblue 1. It is a bit difficult and annoying to keep track of the bonus actions when others take them
Scythe isn't a game in which you can stop and twiddle your thumbs when it isn't your turn. The gears in your brain are generally grinding about your next action and your action after that even on other players' turns. This makes it difficult to stop and pay attention to the actions your opponents are taking in order to ensure that you are receiving the bonuses to which you are entitled for your enlisted soldiers. Of course, your opponents should alert you when they take a bottom action, but it's both easy for them to forget to do so, which can make for some frustrating backwards calculations.



Final Word


Scythe may be a somewhat deceptive game. It LOOKS like a high-conflict, fast-paced, miniature-heavy Ameritrashy game thingy, but it is definitely not. Consequently, it may draw the attention of gamers who would not necessarily be drawn to the type of game this is. And it may draw the ire of such players when they are disappointed to find what it actually is. As such, I think it is important to note that Scythe is NOT about conflict. It is NOT about war. And it is NOT about killing. Yes, those elements are there in a very quiet, muted, Euro-ish way, but they are not the focus of the game. So be aware of that. With that out of the way, let's get to what Scythe actually is.

Scythe is my kind of game. It is a game of puzzles and efficiency with a strong spatial planning element and it is gorgeous! It makes me feel like an adventuring economist, planning to take over the world with my numbers and books and resources and clever planning. I love the multi-layered race and the puzzles generated by the variable action boards and player powers. I know that Scythe will be a game I will reach for for a long, long, long, long time to come!

MINA'S LOVE METER heart heart heart heart heart ALL LOVE ALL THE TIME












***


***


Mina's Love Meter


angry Burn it! - I dislike this game so much that it makes me angry. (I rate these 4 or less on the BGG scale)
Dislike - I don't like this game, but I can see why others like it.
(5 on BGG scale)
heart Some like - I find this game somewhat appealing, but it doesn't really grab me. I am glad to have had the opportunity to try this game, but it is unlikely to stay in my collection for very long.
(5.5 to 6.5) on BGG scale)
heart heart Like - I like this game and appreciate the design. I am happy to play this game occasionally when the mood strikes and enjoy doing so.
(7 to 7.5 on BGG scale)
heart heart heart Some love - I love this game. It's not perfect, but it really appeals to me and I will play it frequently.
(7.5 to 8 on BGG scale)
heart heart heart heart Lots of love - I really love this game. The design really speaks to me. I want to play it most of the time.
(8 to 9 on BGG scale)
heart heart heart heart heart All love all the time - I ADORE this game and can see myself playing it many times and for many years. I would go to sleep clutching it in my arms and want to play it all day every day...only not literally because that would be insane.
(9 to 10 on BGG scale)



To see my other reviews, visit this geeklist.



94 
 Thumb up
3.27
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tristan Sullivan
United States
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
Knew that you loved this from your Instagram!

Very nice review! The game is just so dang daunting but I'm drawn to it. If I ever see it sitting around at a game night I will try it without hesitation.
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rodney Cockrell
United States
Corona
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Very good review! I played on Saturday and hope to play at LEAST two more times this week. So far, it's been 2-player and 4-player so interested in seeing what 3 or 5 looks like. I think it will be fun at any number.
1 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
fiddlygamer wrote:
Knew that you loved this from your Instagram!

Very nice review! The game is just so dang daunting but I'm drawn to it. If I ever see it sitting around at a game night I will try it without hesitation.


Thanks! It's really not as daunting as it looks! The rulebook is good and the rules themselves are relatively straightforward. I hope you get to try it!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Rodzilla68 wrote:
Very good review! I played on Saturday and hope to play at LEAST two more times this week. So far, it's been 2-player and 4-player so interested in seeing what 3 or 5 looks like. I think it will be fun at any number.


Thanks Rodney! I love it with two, but I would happily play at any count! It's just an awesome game!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David G. Cox Esq.
Australia
Port Macquarie
NSW
flag msg tools
badge
Do what you can, with what you've got, where you are.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Your reviews are cutting edge.
3 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
da pyrate wrote:
Your reviews are cutting edge.


Thanks David! heart
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dave Moser
United States
Escondido
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great review, thanks!

One edit: at one point you wrote "...top of the board.." where you obviously meant "...bottom of the board.." Pretty clear in context, but in a game like this, any reduction of confusion is worthwhile.

And one correction: Any unit is allowed to move onto the Factory, not just your Character. However, your Character is the only one allowed to take a Factory card for doing so.

-djm
1 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
dmoser22 wrote:
Great review, thanks!

One edit: at one point you wrote "...top of the board.." where you obviously meant "...bottom of the board.." Pretty clear in context, but in a game like this, any reduction of confusion is worthwhile.

And one correction: Any unit is allowed to move onto the Factory, not just your Character. However, your Character is the only one allowed to take a Factory card for doing so.

-djm


Thanks Dave!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Studley
United States
Rockville
Maryland
flag msg tools
badge
Who fell asleep in the rain? Did you fall asleep in the rain? Yes you did. Oh yes you did.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wonderful review and lovely photography, as always.
1 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
DJStudley wrote:
Wonderful review and lovely photography, as always.


Thanks David!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Melen
United States
Maryland
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Tristan, I agree with Mina that you will learn most of the rules very quickly. My daughter and I played our first game of Scythe last Saturday, and within 3 or 4 turns we had gotten past the 'now, what do we do?' stage and it all made sense.

After that, we both focused on exploiting our individual advantages, and with Rusviet Engineering she trounced me. I played Polania Mechanical, and tried to do a bit of everything. Dumb. A rematch is imminent!

So far, this looks like a classic 'easy to learn, challenging to master' game.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Denise Lockard
United States
Lincoln
Nebraska
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for your review, Mina! I've turned down 2 games this week because it looked too daunting. I will give it a try now. I promise
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Joe Pilkus
United States
South Riding
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Mina,

You always have the most exquisite write-ups! By the way, I thought it was just me...I love the smell of the mechs! Yes, vanilla cupcakes...and then one was accidentally eaten...whistle
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ethan Schaeffer
United States
Toluca Lake
California
flag msg tools
mbmb
It looks daunting, but start playing it, and you should start picking it up pretty quickly.

What really helped me was watching a few of the creator, Jamey Stegmaier's, YouTube videos. He has a 10 minute explanation and a 45 minute walk through that I found very helpful.

Playing the solo version of the game helps as well.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin Garnica
United States
West Covina
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Following your reviews, I knew you'd love this game. And even though you say you don't care for minis, you should retitle this review "Mina's not-so-mini review...with minis!!!"

--- --- ---

For those who are concerned about the games complexity, don't be dissuaded. There is an internal consistency with the rules. There are many of them, but they can be clumped together intuitively for ease of comprehension.

For example, the action mats look complicated, but as soon as you understand that red means "pay" and green means "gain", everything instantly makes sense according to the icons (which are unmistakable).

Another example, all units move the same. Mechs don't move any further than workers because of their size, etc; likewise, any unit can carry any amount of resources with it as it travels, there aren't lots of little fiddly exceptions to rules. They are very logical and simple and consistent.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tod Andrew
Australia
Wollongong
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
thumbsup
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Julien Robert
France
Thiverval-Grignon
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Amazing review
can't wait to try this little gem
if it also works with 2 then it's cherry on the cake
Are the different factions balanced ?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kunter Tätte
Estonia
Tartu
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
milenaguberinic wrote:
... As such, I think it is important to note that Scythe is NOT about conflict. It is NOT about war. And it is NOT about killing. Yes, those elements are there in a very quiet, muted, Euro-ish way, but they are not the focus of the game. ...

I'm glad that you pointed this out. Now I have to put Scythe higher on my wishlist
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tally C
United States
New York City
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
We've also been loving the 2P experience! There may be less battles and players may be able to get control of more territories in a 2P game, but we don't mind that at all. The cave system ensures that if players want to start a fight, they'll easily be able to do so, even in a 2P game. In our games, battles were generally only initiated to either fulfill an objective card, a star-objective, or because we needed to go somewhere and the other person was simply in the way (e.g. on the Factory).

I agree that while all the pieces and cards make it look very heavy and complex, everything is actually quite straight-forward and pretty intuitive.

Great review as always, Mina! thumbsup
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dennis Ku
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
"You can spend all your time making money / Or you can spend all your love making time."
Avatar
mbmbmb
Great review. Your review style is easy to follow and well-written.

I recently played Scythe two-player with the Automa deck controlling a third faction, and it was a lot of fun. It really tightened the board having the third faction in there.

I'm loving the way the Automa deck works. It's almost - almost! - as good as Viticulture's solitaire Automa deck.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dennis Ku
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
"You can spend all your time making money / Or you can spend all your love making time."
Avatar
mbmbmb
Also, I'm going to have to go home and smell my minis. I usually smell everything, and I must have missed it. Alas, it's probably too late, as the smell has probably dissipated already. If it has, I'm going to douse everything in vanilla extract (artificial, obviously - the real stuff is too expensive to waste).
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
mjmelen wrote:
Tristan, I agree with Mina that you will learn most of the rules very quickly. My daughter and I played our first game of Scythe last Saturday, and within 3 or 4 turns we had gotten past the 'now, what do we do?' stage and it all made sense.

After that, we both focused on exploiting our individual advantages, and with Rusviet Engineering she trounced me. I played Polania Mechanical, and tried to do a bit of everything. Dumb. A rematch is imminent!

So far, this looks like a classic 'easy to learn, challenging to master' game.


I agree! Classic easy to learn hard to master!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
homtchr2013 wrote:
Thanks for your review, Mina! I've turned down 2 games this week because it looked too daunting. I will give it a try now. I promise


Try it!!!!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Milena Guberinic
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
badge
Mina's Fresh Cardboard
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The Professor wrote:
Mina,

You always have the most exquisite write-ups! By the way, I thought it was just me...I love the smell of the mechs! Yes, vanilla cupcakes...and then one was accidentally eaten...whistle


Thanks Joe! I've been tempted
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.