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Wizard's Academy» Forums » Sessions

Subject: A Lesson In Magical Emergency Management (Basic Mode) rss

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Big Head Zach
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We finally opened up our game last night and worked our way through the rules, which were pretty straightforward and allowed us to make a lot of decisions. We ran out of time (deck ran out) but near the end it was clear we had spent too much time trying to destroy the guardian in the fifth glyph room, and the Abjure spell was in one of the five slots that required that rune.

Despite the disappointment we still thought the game was great and I was hoping to elicit some advice from other players on how to best instruct the beginner scenario to new players:

* Point out that the Abjure spell is in the Level 2 area, which means
* At least one Guardian must be destroyed to have a chance at finding it
* So also imperative you find the Nova spell (because IIRC that's the only way to destroy a Guardian in this scenario).
* Fire has to be put out, which is done by the Snuff spell or allowing Imps to wander into the fire and steal glyphs. (If there are other methods the basic game provides, let me know.)
* At least one person should dedicate themselves to memorizing the spells exposed, and realize that once the Wild Magic disaster has been played, it won't be played again for quite a while, so definitely don't feel compelled to bind each spell one at a time. Wait until you can nail 4-5 in a single action.

I am slightly concerned as some have said in other posts that if you're not aware of exactly what *could* be in the game, and what your options are, that your chances of success diminish greatly. I think allowing the Mana Crystal room powers (Emergency Recall and the others) would let players feel like they have more options, since near the end if the fire is in multiple rooms, there's no way of putting them all out if you've not been sitting on glyph sources multiple turns grabbing like mad.
 
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Max Maloney
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"If trees could scream, would we be so cavalier about cutting them down? We might, if they screamed all the time, for no good reason." -Jack Handey
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There is a spell that generates water, which is another way to out out fire.

The two times I have taught the basic scenario, I did not tell the other players about any of the spells or disasters in the decks. I feel that better mimics the full game, where most of the cards are randomly selected and players have to adapt using the tools at hand.

I agree that pointing out the guardians must be destroyed is wise, but I wouldn't tell them that there is a specific spell called Nova that does it.
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Brie
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bhz1 wrote:

* Fire has to be put out, which is done by the Snuff spell or allowing Imps to wander into the fire and steal glyphs. (If there are other methods the basic game provides, let me know.)
* At least one person should dedicate themselves to memorizing the spells exposed, and realize that once the Wild Magic disaster has been played, it won't be played again for quite a while, so definitely don't feel compelled to bind each spell one at a time. Wait until you can nail 4-5 in a single action.


I got really lucky and had the fire spread into my mana room when I still had lots of mana. Getting rid of all of the fire at once was worth the mana lost.

I will admit to playing with "perfect memory". I.e., putting markers on spells that aren't bound. In my case, it's because I'm up and down a lot and the game is interrupted (and I'm playing solo), but it is worth noting to new players that while you may get a break between that disaster, I believe it is available from the start which means it will show up three times.

Something I found helpful was to have some characters collect half of the glyphs for the abjure spell and others to collect the other half. That way, the work of getting glyphs was split up, and once the fire was out, the closest person could beeline to the mana crystal and borrow a glyph. Very helpful when the two glyphs needed for the spell are geographically distant on the board.
 
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Ross O'Brien
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There's also a level 2 spell for creating a water portal to put out the fires. It's probably more reliable than waiting for an imp to randomly walk into a room that's in fire, but difficult to get.

I've introduced this scenario to players twice now, and both times it's suffered a bit: we had 5 players in one, 4 players in the other, and the closest glyph source to the mana crystal was at least two rooms away.

Doing the maths here: the disaster deck has 10 cards in it, the progression deck has 6, so you get 52 turns minus the number of players, and each player gets that number divided by the number of players. For 2 players that's 25 turns each; for 3 players that's 16-17; for 4 players that's 12; for 5 players that's 9-10; for 6 players that's 7-8 turns each.

So for 2 players you could be casting a spell by the third player turn and have loads of turns each left to play. For 5 players, even with glyph sharing, you might not be casting until the sixth player turn and already you've shuffled progression cards into the disaster deck; time is not on your side!
 
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Brie
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narrativium wrote:
There's also a level 2 spell for creating a water portal to put out the fires. It's probably more reliable than waiting for an imp to randomly walk into a room that's in fire, but difficult to get.

I've introduced this scenario to players twice now, and both times it's suffered a bit: we had 5 players in one, 4 players in the other, and the closest glyph source to the mana crystal was at least two rooms away.

Doing the maths here: the disaster deck has 10 cards in it, the progression deck has 6, so you get 52 turns minus the number of players, and each player gets that number divided by the number of players. For 2 players that's 25 turns each; for 3 players that's 16-17; for 4 players that's 12; for 5 players that's 9-10; for 6 players that's 7-8 turns each.

So for 2 players you could be casting a spell by the third player turn and have loads of turns each left to play. For 5 players, even with glyph sharing, you might not be casting until the sixth player turn and already you've shuffled progression cards into the disaster deck; time is not on your side!


Interesting point on player count. I've only done it at 2 and 3 players, but 2 players felt easier, and now it makes sense why that was.
 
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David Smullens
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The math isn't quite that simple as you lose turns for every progression, not just once. so for a 2 player game you only lose 4 turns as compared to solo (24 turns each) but if you went the other extreme and went 7 players (not that I'd ever recommend it for this very reason and downtime) you'd be down to almost half the total turns at 28, or just 4 turns each.
 
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