Walt B
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So my first game was solo and a pretty solid win..(felt pretty good on the rules) thought I had it..ha!
So next game today is 2 player with my wife joining me. OoOf I was again bogged down with questions that stopped play. Gave up abandoning the game till I get this figured out.

So below are my ramblings as they occurred to me. Please be gentle as I know these questions probably are aggravating having been gone over countless times I'm sure!

1. So my wife's threat was sufficient to bring about the attack of the ungoliant spawn in round one..badd news!
So with that in mind and her having forest snare how best could she use it to protect herself?
At this point the spawn was hers to deal with as her threat was 32. From what I researched its shadow effect took affect and the spawn gets to attack once (killing her one hero) from what I read only then was it trapped.

What then? Unclear if the spawn continues to draw shadow cards each round? Does it just sit there indefinitely?

2. I felt helpless it seemed I had no way to offer support..I'm only aware of ranged and the other but is there more that can be done?

3. I see with 2 players you get cards that outside your sphere in your hand..did we do something wrong ? Is there something that can be done with these cards or should we just discard them or set aside?

4. I had the ole' forest spider from the previous round still about with I'm sure the classic one hp remaining. I now had new enemy from the staging area attack me.
Do I deal with the original spidey first then deal with the next showing then his shadow card?
I only had a defense for the original spider and nothing left which I believe caused a +2 damage on top of everything killing any one of my heroes as well!
Not sure what's the correct move.

5.My wife wanted to use some healing card proactively once it was assured her hero would die. I assume once the damage has been dealt there's no going back.

6. Looking ahead for my wife with only two heroes remaining..with out forest snare, would she have been eventually wiped out without an amazing card draw?

So much thanks for helping us..my rule book is in the office and googling was driving me crazy!
Any direction and help so appreciated!
 
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Andrew Schoonmaker
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Floridawalt wrote:
1. So my wife's threat was sufficient to bring about the attack of the ungoliant spawn in round one..badd news!
So with that in mind and her having forest snare how best could she use it to protect herself?

At this point the spawn was hers to deal with as her threat was 32. From what I researched its shadow effect took affect and the spawn gets to attack once (killing her one hero) from what I read only then was it trapped.

What then? Unclear if the spawn continues to draw shadow cards each round? Does it just sit there indefinitely?

Well, ideally she'd have a cheap ally to throw in front of the spider, but many heroes can also survive an attack of five points (assuming that the shadow cards don't do anything too horrible). It is true that, barring weird engagement tricks (e.g. Son of Arnor pulling the spider during the planning phase), you have to survive an attack from the enemy before you can use Forest Snare on it.

After it is snared, it does get dealt a shadow card each round (as usual), but since it does not attack the card will be discarded without effect at the end of the combat phase.

If you get some effect that requires you to discard an attachment you control, you might have to choose Forest Snare, letting the spider out. Otherwise, yes, it will sit there indefinitely until you defeat it (or some other effect moves it).

Quote:
2. I felt helpless it seemed I had no way to offer support..I'm only aware of ranged and the other but is there more that can be done?

Ranged and Sentinel are the ways of offering direct combat support. You can also play attachments to make the other deck's characters better, or pass a Wandering Took across for some extra combat support, or using other card effects to make life easier.

Each player can also optionally engage one enemy each turn, so if your deck was better suited to handle the Ungoliant's Spawn, perhaps you could have taken it instead (although it sounds as though you had your own challenges to overcome).
Quote:
3. I see with 2 players you get cards that outside your sphere in your hand..did we do something wrong ? Is there something that can be done with these cards or should we just discard them or set aside?

I don't understand how that would happen, unless you built the decks that way. If you're just using the starters, each of you has a separate deck of 30 cards, which should all be of the same sphere as your heroes (except Gandalf, who is neutral).

In general, it is perfectly legal to have cards in your hand that you have no resource match for, and you cannot discard them or set them aside unless some effect tells you to do so. You probably don't want to get into this situation without a plan.
Quote:
4. I had the ole' forest spider from the previous round still about with I'm sure the classic one hp remaining. I now had new enemy from the staging area attack me.
Do I deal with the original spidey first then deal with the next showing then his shadow card?
I only had a defense for the original spider and nothing left which I believe caused a +2 damage on top of everything killing any one of my heroes as well!
Not sure what's the correct move.

You deal each of them a shadow card, and during the portion of the combat phase when you're resolving enemy attacks, you choose one enemy at a time, declare a defender (or that the attack is undefended), and resolve the attack. You can choose the enemies in whatever order you like. After you have resolved all enemy attacks, you then get to counterattack (much as in the first round).

If you only had one character unexhausted, then (barring another deck's character with Sentinel or the like) you're going to get to take one of the attacks undefended, and hope the damage isn't enough to kill a hero. As you found out, the first quest puts a lot of emphasis on not letting undefended attacks through, since most of the shadow effects are quite nasty if the attack is undefended.

Quote:
5.My wife wanted to use some healing card proactively once it was assured her hero would die. I assume once the damage has been dealt there's no going back.

If the hero takes fatal damage in one blow, then yes, it is too late for healing. The Spirit deck has a card, "Fortune or Fate", that can bring back a dead hero, but it is pretty expensive.

Quote:
6. Looking ahead for my wife with only two heroes remaining..with out forest snare, would she have been eventually wiped out without an amazing card draw?

Getting an Ungoliant's Spawn dropped in your lap in round one is pretty unpleasant, to be sure. Without a Forest Snare, you'd hope to get a steady stream of cheap defenders to feed to the spider, while building up enough attack power to defeat it. With other enemies coming out, obviously this can be a tricky proposition, but not impossible.

Quote:
So much thanks for helping us..my rule book is in the office and googling was driving me crazy!

The rulebook is available for download as a PDF from the Fantasy Flight web site (see https://www.fantasyflightgames.com/en/products/the-lord-of-t...), if you need to refer to it.

Hope the answers are of some use.
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Robin Munn

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While Andrew Schoonmaker has given you good answers, there's one question of yours where his answer didn't quite cover enough ground:

Floridawalt wrote:
5.My wife wanted to use some healing card proactively once it was assured her hero would die. I assume once the damage has been dealt there's no going back.


The steps of combat are a bit tricky to understand at first; the rules on page 18 are decent but often leave new players with questions. Here's how it works, with examples:

1. Choose an enemy. All the enemies that are engaged with you will attack you eventually, but you can choose the order in which you will resolve those attacks. At this time, you choose one enemy whose attack you're going to resolve.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

2. Declare defender. Choose a character (who must be ready, that is, unexhausted) as a defender. Normally, you then exhaust him. Some characters have a special "Does not exhaust to defend" ability -- but even those MUST be ready before you can choose them as a defender. If they were previously exhausted for some other reason (say, by a Treachery card) then you cannot use them to defend.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

3. Resolve shadow effect. At this time, you flip the shadow card face-up and resolve its effect. Note that there is NO action window between flipping it face-up and resolving its effect! That's why cards like Silver Lamp are so valuable: they let you see the shadow effect as soon as it's dealt, but the effect is still only resolved at the normal time.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

4. Determine combat damage and apply the damage.

Action window: You can play actions now, after the damage has been applied. Then if there are any more enemies whose attack you haven't resolved, you'll go back to step 1 and choose a new enemy.

As I mentioned, there is NO action window between flipping a shadow card face-up and resolving its effect. But there IS an action window between resolving the shadow effect and applying damage. And that's where the precise nature of the shadow effect can matter.

You said, "My wife wanted to use some healing card proactively once it was assured her hero would die." She might have been wrong, or she might have been right -- it all depends on something you didn't tell us (because you didn't know it mattered). What was the shadow effect? There are two possibilities:

1) The shadow effect was something like "Deal 1 damage to each character the defending player controls", and her hero had only 1 hit point remaining. In this case, there is no action window between flipping over the shadow card and resolving its effect, so there is no opportunity to save her hero.

2) The shadow effect was something like "Attacking enemy gets +1 Attack". Her hero is already wounded, and the printed attack strength would have been enough to leave her hero with 1 HP left. But with the boosted attack strength, the attack will deal just enough damage to kill her hero. In this case, there IS an action window between resolving the shadow effect and dealing damage. So there is time to play a healing card before the damage is dealt. And if that heals the hero enough that the boosted attack strength is no longer enough to kill him, then that hero will survive another turn.

Actually, there is one more possibility:

2b) Her hero had NO damage previously, and the printed attack strength of the enemy would be enough to leave the hero with just 1 HP remaining. (This would be the case, for example, if an unwounded Denethor is defending against Ungoliant's Spawn). But the shadow effect gives a +1 to the enemy's attack strength, so it will be able to deal just enough damage to kill the hero. Here, a healing effect will NOT save the hero, because there is no damage on the hero to heal. (Once you start placing damage tokens, you have to place them all at once; there is no opportunity to, say, place two tokens, then play an action to heal two damage, then place the rest of the damage tokens). However, an effect which gives the hero +1 Defense (like Blade Mastery does, for example) WOULD save Denethor in this scenario. Because now, instead of being 5 attack vs. 3 defense, the math will be 6 attack vs. 4 defense, and Denethor still gets only 2 damage placed on him.
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Walt B
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Holy cowz you guys are so awesome I can't thank you enough for the effort to help!
If I may I'll address a little and return to add a follow up or two..but for the most part that helped tremendously!

"Each player can also optionally engage one enemy each turn, so if your deck was better suited to handle the Ungoliant's Spawn, perhaps you could have taken it instead (although it sounds as though you had your own challenges to overcome)."

So with the Ungoliant spawn for example..it was engaged with my wife's heroes..
Could someone go into a little detail what options I had to assist?
I can play my attachments to make her deck better? Does it require a matching Sphere no?
If the spawn is on her side engaged..can attack also? As in a combined attack?

Elaborating on these thoughts appreciated !!
 
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rmunn wrote:
While Andrew Schoonmaker has given you good answers, there's one question of yours where his answer didn't quite cover enough ground:

Floridawalt wrote:
5.My wife wanted to use some healing card proactively once it was assured her hero would die. I assume once the damage has been dealt there's no going back.


The steps of combat are a bit tricky to understand at first; the rules on page 18 are decent but often leave new players with questions. Here's how it works, with examples:

1. Choose an enemy. All the enemies that are engaged with you will attack you eventually, but you can choose the order in which you will resolve those attacks. At this time, you choose one enemy whose attack you're going to resolve.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

2. Declare defender. Choose a character (who must be ready, that is, unexhausted) as a defender. Normally, you then exhaust him. Some characters have a special "Does not exhaust to defend" ability -- but even those MUST be ready before you can choose them as a defender. If they were previously exhausted for some other reason (say, by a Treachery card) then you cannot use them to defend.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

3. Resolve shadow effect. At this time, you flip the shadow card face-up and resolve its effect. Note that there is NO action window between flipping it face-up and resolving its effect! That's why cards like Silver Lamp are so valuable: they let you see the shadow effect as soon as it's dealt, but the effect is still only resolved at the normal time.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

4. Determine combat damage and apply the damage.

Action window: You can play actions now, after the damage has been applied. Then if there are any more enemies whose attack you haven't resolved, you'll go back to step 1 and choose a new enemy.

As I mentioned, there is NO action window between flipping a shadow card face-up and resolving its effect. But there IS an action window between resolving the shadow effect and applying damage. And that's where the precise nature of the shadow effect can matter.

You said, "My wife wanted to use some healing card proactively once it was assured her hero would die." She might have been wrong, or she might have been right -- it all depends on something you didn't tell us (because you didn't know it mattered). What was the shadow effect? There are two possibilities:

1) The shadow effect was something like "Deal 1 damage to each character the defending player controls", and her hero had only 1 hit point remaining. In this case, there is no action window between flipping over the shadow card and resolving its effect, so there is no opportunity to save her hero.

2) The shadow effect was something like "Attacking enemy gets +1 Attack". Her hero is already wounded, and the printed attack strength would have been enough to leave her hero with 1 HP left. But with the boosted attack strength, the attack will deal just enough damage to kill her hero. In this case, there IS an action window between resolving the shadow effect and dealing damage. So there is time to play a healing card before the damage is dealt. And if that heals the hero enough that the boosted attack strength is no longer enough to kill him, then that hero will survive another turn.

Actually, there is one more possibility:

2b) Her hero had NO damage previously, and the printed attack strength of the enemy would be enough to leave the hero with just 1 HP remaining. (This would be the case, for example, if an unwounded Denethor is defending against Ungoliant's Spawn). But the shadow effect gives a +1 to the enemy's attack strength, so it will be able to deal just enough damage to kill the hero. Here, a healing effect will NOT save the hero, because there is no damage on the hero to heal. (Once you start placing damage tokens, you have to place them all at once; there is no opportunity to, say, place two tokens, then play an action to heal two damage, then place the rest of the damage tokens). However, an effect which gives the hero +1 Defense (like Blade Mastery does, for example) WOULD save Denethor in this scenario. Because now, instead of being 5 attack vs. 3 defense, the math will be 6 attack vs. 4 defense, and Denethor still gets only 2 damage placed on him.


So so through man! I'll be reading this multiple times for sure!

I think at this point my only brief question would be could you explain in the "Action Window " phase what options does a player generally have?

I assume that's when a person could buy cards for beneficial effects? And as asked above do I understand that I can share these with the other players?

Thanks so much...hope to try this again later today!
 
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Tim Franklin
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Floridawalt wrote:
So with the Ungoliant spawn for example..it was engaged with my wife's heroes..
Could someone go into a little detail what options I had to assist?


Once it's engaged, your options are a bit more limited, but the point that the previous poster is trying to make is that you have an optional engagement step *before* the forced engagement.

So, on the first turn, even though her threat was high enough to engage the spawn, and she was (presumably) the first player, you could have optionally engaged the spawn if you had the better deck to deal with it.

Quote:
I can play my attachments to make her deck better? Does it require a matching Sphere no?


You only need a matching sphere to *pay* for the attachment. Any other restrictions are purely what's written on the card - so it may say "one of your heroes", or "a Lore hero", or some other non-sphere keyword requirement, like "Gondor" or "Dwarf".

Quote:
If the spawn is on her side engaged..can attack also? As in a combined attack?


To attack, or participate in an attack, on an enemy engaged with another player, you need characters with the "Ranged" keyword. Have a look at "Ranged" on p24 of the rulebook.
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Kārlis Jēriņš
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Floridawalt wrote:
rmunn wrote:
While Andrew Schoonmaker has given you good answers, there's one question of yours where his answer didn't quite cover enough ground:

Floridawalt wrote:
5.My wife wanted to use some healing card proactively once it was assured her hero would die. I assume once the damage has been dealt there's no going back.


The steps of combat are a bit tricky to understand at first; the rules on page 18 are decent but often leave new players with questions. Here's how it works, with examples:

1. Choose an enemy. All the enemies that are engaged with you will attack you eventually, but you can choose the order in which you will resolve those attacks. At this time, you choose one enemy whose attack you're going to resolve.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

2. Declare defender. Choose a character (who must be ready, that is, unexhausted) as a defender. Normally, you then exhaust him. Some characters have a special "Does not exhaust to defend" ability -- but even those MUST be ready before you can choose them as a defender. If they were previously exhausted for some other reason (say, by a Treachery card) then you cannot use them to defend.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

3. Resolve shadow effect. At this time, you flip the shadow card face-up and resolve its effect. Note that there is NO action window between flipping it face-up and resolving its effect! That's why cards like Silver Lamp are so valuable: they let you see the shadow effect as soon as it's dealt, but the effect is still only resolved at the normal time.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

4. Determine combat damage and apply the damage.

Action window: You can play actions now, after the damage has been applied. Then if there are any more enemies whose attack you haven't resolved, you'll go back to step 1 and choose a new enemy.

As I mentioned, there is NO action window between flipping a shadow card face-up and resolving its effect. But there IS an action window between resolving the shadow effect and applying damage. And that's where the precise nature of the shadow effect can matter.

You said, "My wife wanted to use some healing card proactively once it was assured her hero would die." She might have been wrong, or she might have been right -- it all depends on something you didn't tell us (because you didn't know it mattered). What was the shadow effect? There are two possibilities:

1) The shadow effect was something like "Deal 1 damage to each character the defending player controls", and her hero had only 1 hit point remaining. In this case, there is no action window between flipping over the shadow card and resolving its effect, so there is no opportunity to save her hero.

2) The shadow effect was something like "Attacking enemy gets +1 Attack". Her hero is already wounded, and the printed attack strength would have been enough to leave her hero with 1 HP left. But with the boosted attack strength, the attack will deal just enough damage to kill her hero. In this case, there IS an action window between resolving the shadow effect and dealing damage. So there is time to play a healing card before the damage is dealt. And if that heals the hero enough that the boosted attack strength is no longer enough to kill him, then that hero will survive another turn.

Actually, there is one more possibility:

2b) Her hero had NO damage previously, and the printed attack strength of the enemy would be enough to leave the hero with just 1 HP remaining. (This would be the case, for example, if an unwounded Denethor is defending against Ungoliant's Spawn). But the shadow effect gives a +1 to the enemy's attack strength, so it will be able to deal just enough damage to kill the hero. Here, a healing effect will NOT save the hero, because there is no damage on the hero to heal. (Once you start placing damage tokens, you have to place them all at once; there is no opportunity to, say, place two tokens, then play an action to heal two damage, then place the rest of the damage tokens). However, an effect which gives the hero +1 Defense (like Blade Mastery does, for example) WOULD save Denethor in this scenario. Because now, instead of being 5 attack vs. 3 defense, the math will be 6 attack vs. 4 defense, and Denethor still gets only 2 damage placed on him.


So so through man! I'll be reading this multiple times for sure!

I think at this point my only brief question would be could you explain in the "Action Window " phase what options does a player generally have?

I assume that's when a person could buy cards for beneficial effects? And as asked above do I understand that I can share these with the other players?

Thanks so much...hope to try this again later today!


Allies and attachments can generally only be played during the Planning phase. Allies always enter play under your control unless an effect explicitly states otherwise, but attachments can generally be attached to any player's characters.

Action window means that you can activate any ability that starts with "Action: ". There are also action abilities that are restricted to a specific phase of the turn, for example Quest Action: or Refresh Action: - those can be activated during any action window of the corresponding phase.
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rmunn wrote:
While Andrew Schoonmaker has given you good answers, there's one question of yours where his answer didn't quite cover enough ground:

Floridawalt wrote:
5.My wife wanted to use some healing card proactively once it was assured her hero would die. I assume once the damage has been dealt there's no going back.


The steps of combat are a bit tricky to understand at first; the rules on page 18 are decent but often leave new players with questions. Here's how it works, with examples:

1. Choose an enemy. All the enemies that are engaged with you will attack you eventually, but you can choose the order in which you will resolve those attacks. At this time, you choose one enemy whose attack you're going to resolve.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

2. Declare defender. Choose a character (who must be ready, that is, unexhausted) as a defender. Normally, you then exhaust him. Some characters have a special "Does not exhaust to defend" ability -- but even those MUST be ready before you can choose them as a defender. If they were previously exhausted for some other reason (say, by a Treachery card) then you cannot use them to defend.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

3. Resolve shadow effect. At this time, you flip the shadow card face-up and resolve its effect. Note that there is NO action window between flipping it face-up and resolving its effect! That's why cards like Silver Lamp are so valuable: they let you see the shadow effect as soon as it's dealt, but the effect is still only resolved at the normal time.

Action window: You can play actions now before moving on to the next step.

4. Determine combat damage and apply the damage.

Action window: You can play actions now, after the damage has been applied. Then if there are any more enemies whose attack you haven't resolved, you'll go back to step 1 and choose a new enemy.

As I mentioned, there is NO action window between flipping a shadow card face-up and resolving its effect. But there IS an action window between resolving the shadow effect and applying damage. And that's where the precise nature of the shadow effect can matter.

You said, "My wife wanted to use some healing card proactively once it was assured her hero would die." She might have been wrong, or she might have been right -- it all depends on something you didn't tell us (because you didn't know it mattered). What was the shadow effect? There are two possibilities:

1) The shadow effect was something like "Deal 1 damage to each character the defending player controls", and her hero had only 1 hit point remaining. In this case, there is no action window between flipping over the shadow card and resolving its effect, so there is no opportunity to save her hero.

2) The shadow effect was something like "Attacking enemy gets +1 Attack". Her hero is already wounded, and the printed attack strength would have been enough to leave her hero with 1 HP left. But with the boosted attack strength, the attack will deal just enough damage to kill her hero. In this case, there IS an action window between resolving the shadow effect and dealing damage. So there is time to play a healing card before the damage is dealt. And if that heals the hero enough that the boosted attack strength is no longer enough to kill him, then that hero will survive another turn.

Actually, there is one more possibility:

2b) Her hero had NO damage previously, and the printed attack strength of the enemy would be enough to leave the hero with just 1 HP remaining. (This would be the case, for example, if an unwounded Denethor is defending against Ungoliant's Spawn). But the shadow effect gives a +1 to the enemy's attack strength, so it will be able to deal just enough damage to kill the hero. Here, a healing effect will NOT save the hero, because there is no damage on the hero to heal. (Once you start placing damage tokens, you have to place them all at once; there is no opportunity to, say, place two tokens, then play an action to heal two damage, then place the rest of the damage tokens). However, an effect which gives the hero +1 Defense (like Blade Mastery does, for example) WOULD save Denethor in this scenario. Because now, instead of being 5 attack vs. 3 defense, the math will be 6 attack vs. 4 defense, and Denethor still gets only 2 damage placed on him.

That "One more possibility" was exactly what she was facing!
 
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Floridawalt wrote:

I think at this point my only brief question would be could you explain in the "Action Window " phase what options does a player generally have?

I assume that's when a person could buy cards for beneficial effects? And as asked above do I understand that I can share these with the other players?


Since you're pretty new, I'll take it from the top.

There are three kinds of cards that you might have in your hand: Allies, Attachments and Events. Allies and attachments are permanent (you pay for them once, then they go on the table and are permanently in play). Events are one-shots: you pay for them, use their text, then put them in your discard pile.

Allies have stats (will, attack, defense, and HP). Most of them also have some kind of special text at the bottom of the card. Sometimes that text includes an Action: or Response: trigger.

Attachments have no stats, but will indicate what kind of card they can be attached to ("Attach to a hero" or "Attach to a Dwarf character", and so on). Their text often is a passive, always-in-effect ability like "Attached hero gains +1 attack", but sometimes they also have an Action: or Response: trigger.

Events also have no stats, and do not attach to anything. Any time you want to use their card text (which is almost ALWAYS either an Action: or a Response: trigger), you pay their listed cost, then play them and do what it says on the card.

Now -- see where all these cards have either Action or Response triggers? That's what it means. If you have a card with an Action trigger, you may only play it during an "Action window". If you have a card with a Response trigger, you may play it ANY time its particular trigger (the thing it responds to) happens. For example, there is no action window between flipping over a shadow card and resolving its effect. You may NOT play Action cards at that time. But dig out a copy of Hasty Stroke from your core set and take a look at it. It reads, "Response: Cancel a shadow effect just triggered during combat." It is an event, with a cost of 1 Spirit resource. So if you have a copy of Hasty Stroke in your hand, AND you have 1 Spirit resource available to use -- then after you turn over a shadow card and see its shadow effect, you DO have an opportunity to cancel it by paying 1 Spirit resource and playing Hasty Stroke from your hand. If Hasty Stroke had an Action trigger, you wouldn't have been able to play it at that moment, because there is no action window at that time (the time between flipping over a shadow card and resolving its effect). But because Hasty Stroke was a Response, you could use its effect and cancel the nasty shadow effect that, say, was about to kill Denethor.

Now. As I mentioned before, it isn't only Event cards that have Action: triggers. Allies and attachments have them too. If an ally or attachment is in play, then its Action: triggers can ALSO be used any time you have an action window. But unlike events, since the ally or attachment card is ALREADY in play, you don't have to pay its resource cost to use its Action: trigger. And there's another difference between events and the other two categories (allies & attachments): Event cards can be played during ANY phase. Allies and attachments can ONLY be played during the Planning phase (which is, basically, the first phase of the game, before questing, travel, engagement and combat).

So when you say "that's when a person could buy cards for beneficial effects" -- if you mean Event cards, then yes. Event cards that have an Action: trigger can be bought during any Action window. (Event cards with a Response: trigger can be bought EVEN IF THERE IS NO ACTION WINDOW, as long as whatever they respond to has just happened.)

But if you mean ally and attachment cards, then no -- the Action windows are not when you can buy an ally or attachment. The Action windows are when you can USE the Action: abilities of allies or attachments you've already bought.



You also asked whether you can share these cards with other players. Basically, yes. Event cards that say "Choose a hero" or "Choose an ally" (and then do something good for that hero or ally) can be targeted at ANY hero or ally on the board, whether it's one you control or one that another player controls. (If the card says "Choose an ally you control", then you can't use it on your wife's allies, of course.) And if you're playing an attachment (during the Planning phase, which is the only time you can play attachments), then you are allowed to put those attachments on characters controlled by other players. (Again, unless it says "Attach to a hero/ally/character you control").

Also note that when you play an attachment on other players' characters, that attachment now becomes "under their control". So if a shadow card told your wife to "choose and discard one attachment you control", and the only attachment she has is an Unexpected Courage that you played on her hero, then sorry -- that Unexpected Courage is now considered under her control, and the shadow effect will make her choose it (since it's the only eligible attachment) and discard it.

So, I've just explained that you can play Event cards on your wife's characters, and put Attachments on her characters. BUT allies are different. You may NOT pay for an ally and immediately put it under another player's control. Allies MUST be played on your side of the table.

I hope that answers your questions. Please let us know if you have more!
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Katharine
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Very well said, Robin!

Walt, I think you mentioned upthread that your deck had cards for which you had no resource match? So if you were playing, say, mono-Leadership (i.e., all 3 of your heroes were from the Leadership sphere), you found yourself drawing Spirit cards from your deck? Is that what was happening to you - or did I misunderstand something there?

Edited to add: Just a thought, were you and your wife by any chance *sharing* a single deck of cards?
 
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Walt B
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rmunn wrote:
Floridawalt wrote:

I think at this point my only brief question would be could you explain in the "Action Window " phase what options does a player generally have?

I assume that's when a person could buy cards for beneficial effects? And as asked above do I understand that I can share these with the other players?


Since you're pretty new, I'll take it from the top.

There are three kinds of cards that you might have in your hand: Allies, Attachments and Events. Allies and attachments are permanent (you pay for them once, then they go on the table and are permanently in play). Events are one-shots: you pay for them, use their text, then put them in your discard pile.

Allies have stats (will, attack, defense, and HP). Most of them also have some kind of special text at the bottom of the card. Sometimes that text includes an Action: or Response: trigger.

Attachments have no stats, but will indicate what kind of card they can be attached to ("Attach to a hero" or "Attach to a Dwarf character", and so on). Their text often is a passive, always-in-effect ability like "Attached hero gains +1 attack", but sometimes they also have an Action: or Response: trigger.

Events also have no stats, and do not attach to anything. Any time you want to use their card text (which is almost ALWAYS either an Action: or a Response: trigger), you pay their listed cost, then play them and do what it says on the card.

Now -- see where all these cards have either Action or Response triggers? That's what it means. If you have a card with an Action trigger, you may only play it during an "Action window". If you have a card with a Response trigger, you may play it ANY time its particular trigger (the thing it responds to) happens. For example, there is no action window between flipping over a shadow card and resolving its effect. You may NOT play Action cards at that time. But dig out a copy of Hasty Stroke from your core set and take a look at it. It reads, "Response: Cancel a shadow effect just triggered during combat." It is an event, with a cost of 1 Spirit resource. So if you have a copy of Hasty Stroke in your hand, AND you have 1 Spirit resource available to use -- then after you turn over a shadow card and see its shadow effect, you DO have an opportunity to cancel it by paying 1 Spirit resource and playing Hasty Stroke from your hand. If Hasty Stroke had an Action trigger, you wouldn't have been able to play it at that moment, because there is no action window at that time (the time between flipping over a shadow card and resolving its effect). But because Hasty Stroke was a Response, you could use its effect and cancel the nasty shadow effect that, say, was about to kill Denethor.

Now. As I mentioned before, it isn't only Event cards that have Action: triggers. Allies and attachments have them too. If an ally or attachment is in play, then its Action: triggers can ALSO be used any time you have an action window. But unlike events, since the ally or attachment card is ALREADY in play, you don't have to pay its resource cost to use its Action: trigger. And there's another difference between events and the other two categories (allies & attachments): Event cards can be played during ANY phase. Allies and attachments can ONLY be played during the Planning phase (which is, basically, the first phase of the game, before questing, travel, engagement and combat).

So when you say "that's when a person could buy cards for beneficial effects" -- if you mean Event cards, then yes. Event cards that have an Action: trigger can be bought during any Action window. (Event cards with a Response: trigger can be bought EVEN IF THERE IS NO ACTION WINDOW, as long as whatever they respond to has just happened.)

But if you mean ally and attachment cards, then no -- the Action windows are not when you can buy an ally or attachment. The Action windows are when you can USE the Action: abilities of allies or attachments you've already bought.



You also asked whether you can share these cards with other players. Basically, yes. Event cards that say "Choose a hero" or "Choose an ally" (and then do something good for that hero or ally) can be targeted at ANY hero or ally on the board, whether it's one you control or one that another player controls. (If the card says "Choose an ally you control", then you can't use it on your wife's allies, of course.) And if you're playing an attachment (during the Planning phase, which is the only time you can play attachments), then you are allowed to put those attachments on characters controlled by other players. (Again, unless it says "Attach to a hero/ally/character you control").

Also note that when you play an attachment on other players' characters, that attachment now becomes "under their control". So if a shadow card told your wife to "choose and discard one attachment you control", and the only attachment she has is an Unexpected Courage that you played on her hero, then sorry -- that Unexpected Courage is now considered under her control, and the shadow effect will make her choose it (since it's the only eligible attachment) and discard it.

So, I've just explained that you can play Event cards on your wife's characters, and put Attachments on her characters. BUT allies are different. You may NOT pay for an ally and immediately put it under another player's control. Allies MUST be played on your side of the table.

I hope that answers your questions. Please let us know if you have more!


You RoCk !! I will be reading and rereading !!
Thanks !!
 
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Walt B
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ktrick wrote:
Very well said, Robin!

Walt, I think you mentioned upthread that your deck had cards for which you had no resource match? So if you were playing, say, mono-Leadership (i.e., all 3 of your heroes were from the Leadership sphere), you found yourself drawing Spirit cards from your deck? Is that what was happening to you - or did I misunderstand something there?

Edited to add: Just a thought, were you and your wife by any chance *sharing* a single deck of cards?


Nah no way ..who would ever do that!
(Well actually yes..yes I would have done exactly that!)
Lol
Figured that out after the first barrage of questions.
 
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