Mike Oberly
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I have been trying to parse this, and for some reason it's not clear to me. When determining available commands per formation within the force, is a 'formation' generally considered a company? For example, in scenario 3, it is correct that the Soviets and Germans each have one 'formation' (i.e., one company each) for this determination? And in scenario 7, the Soviets and Germans each have two 'formations' (i.e., each have two companies) for this determination? (In the latter instance, one of the Soviet formations consisting of just two SU-85s)

Does this sound correct?
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Warren Wawrosch
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Yes, each company is named, with grade, morale, number of units, etc.. Multiple companies make up a side's force(s), but each may have unique characteristics defining the company including the number of commands it will receive.

In the Panzer Playbook, I use page 9's balloon call-outs to make sense of the individual companies from the scenarios. After the company morale is the number indicating the number of combat units for determining commands for that formation. I use formation and company interchangeably.

In scenario 3, the Russians force has a reinforced tank company of 14 units used to determine the number of available commands and the Germans force has a tank company of 15 units used to determine the number of commands.

In scenario 7, the Russians force has one reinforced tank company with 20 units initially and 2 units arriving later as reinforcements for the same company bring the company up to 22 units. The Germans force here have two distinctive companies with differing company grades, morales, and number of units.

Study page 9, it should make sense to you.

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Brent Pollock
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Yes, that's the way I read page 9 of the playbook. If it has one of those headers with points, it is a Formation, then the subordinate platoons have the counter depictions surrounded by the box.
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Mike Oberly
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Thanks so much, guys. I think I get it now. I see that the scenario 7 Soviet force is really one company after this explanation, but I wasn't getting that before.

I'm probably just thick skulled, but I do think this could have been made plainer.

Playing first advanced rules game tonight, thanks again.
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Fernando Sola Ramos
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MikeOberly wrote:
I have been trying to parse this, and for some reason it's not clear to me. When determining available commands per formation within the force, is a 'formation' generally considered a company? For example, in scenario 3, it is correct that the Soviets and Germans each have one 'formation' (i.e., one company each) for this determination? And in scenario 7, the Soviets and Germans each have two 'formations' (i.e., each have two companies) for this determination? (In the latter instance, one of the Soviet formations consisting of just two SU-85s)

Does this sound correct?


You divide each side Order of Battle (OOB) into Force, Formation and Units. The whole OOB of a side is that side's Force. That Force is divided into different Formations (each Formation is Company sized). And each Formation has a number of units.

Force grade is used for Initiative determination. Formation grade is used for commands and morale: max number of commands that particualr formation has available each turn, the command range, and the number of casualties that formation may take before reaching its Cohesion Point. Lastly, units compose formations. Some units may have a different grade than its Formation grade (but not morale). This is used for a number of things: increase or decrease the spotting ability of that unit, its AP and GP modifiers when firing, etc.

Scenario 3: each force has 1 formation.

Scenario 7: the German force has 2 formations: one is part of the holding force, the other is part of the relief force. But the Soviet force has only one formation. The two SU-85s that you refer as the second formation are part of the Tank Company (+) when using the Morale rules. This happens because when using morale rules unit point values change and sometimes, to maintain force ratios, a number of units must be added to one force (within a formation) to balance the scenario again. Note the Additional quotation before the Tank Company text, and that Cohesion Point (morale rules) information is present in this second case, while in the first case is not.
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Mike Oberly
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Thank you, Fernando.
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Jim Day
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MikeOberly wrote:
I'm probably just thick skulled, but I do think this could have been made plainer.

Did you review the Scenario Key on p9 of the Playbook?
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