Rick Fuss
United States
Illinois
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Aside from the differences in words on the codenames cards and the art on the agent tiles, I noticed the following differences in components:

Codenames includes a sandtimer.
Codenames: Deep Undercover does not include a sandtimer.

Codenames includes rules for 2- and 3-player variants.
Codenames: Deep Undercover includes flavor text for each the bystanders (each bystander in the game has unique artwork) instead of 2- and 3-player rules. You'll need to download the 2- and 3-player rules if you want them.

Both contain 200 codenames cards, but 5 of the cards in Deep Undercover are blank DIY cards.
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Elliott HillJennings
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Cornelius
North Carolina
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The agent/bystander tiles are also of a much lower quality.
 
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Chris McCoy
United States
Georgia
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We are probably going to start using all of the bystander tiles mixed in to our standard Codenames box, along with the word cards (in labeled bags) because the bystander cards are funny.
 
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Jardal
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I just picked it up and "much lower quality" is iffy at best. Different, sure, but _much_ lower? Ehh
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Steve Beeman
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Houston
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Worst part so far for me is that I'm missing the stand for the clue givers to put the card up on.
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Texas
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SteoanK wrote:
Worst part so far for me is that I'm missing the stand for the clue givers to put the card up on.

Try a business card holder or use the stand on your cell phone to prop the card against the phone.
 
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Seth Dodson
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Akron
Pennsylvania
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Really? My copy has the little stand. Might want to email them about a replacement.

I like the new artwork in Deep Undercover a million times more than the base game, the agents look very cool.
 
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Harold Tessmann III
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Ypsilanti
Michigan
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rickfuss wrote:
Aside from the differences in words on the codenames cards and the art on the agent tiles,

I'll give them points on the agent art: the style is close enough to the original that I had to compare the red and blue tiles to determine that they didn't reuse them. The long-pointed collars on the agents and the overall look of a few of the bystanders gave me a 70s Starsky and Hutch vibe, and I liked that, but the other bystanders evoke a different time period; oh well. Along those lines, the original tiles had men on one side and women on the other, while these tiles all have the same art front-and-back. If this bothers you, I suggest you write your complaints on a piece of paper, throw it away, and try not to think about it. You'll be glad you did.

rickfuss wrote:
I noticed the following differences in components:

Codenames includes a sandtimer.
Codenames: Deep Undercover does not include a sandtimer.

Did anybody ever use the timer? Thinking too long was so rarely an issue that I left it in the box, and if it ever became an issue I'd say "any time now... OK, five, four, three, two, one" before I'd bother getting the timer out.

rickfuss wrote:
Codenames includes rules for 2- and 3-player variants.
Codenames: Deep Undercover includes flavor text for each the bystanders (each bystander in the game has unique artwork) instead of 2- and 3-player rules. You'll need to download the 2- and 3-player rules if you want them.

This is true, but also not a big loss, in my view. If I only had two or three players, I'd rather play something else. If you only have that many people and you're determined to play Codenames, here's the rules:

Three players: Play like normal, with two spymasters, except the third person guesses for both teams. If you're worried that the guesser could intentionally guess better for one spymaster than the other, you should really just relax.
Two players: Play like normal, except that the spymaster simulates the other team's turn by placing a tile on one of their words (choosing strategically OK). The fewer the number of turns it takes you to win, the better.

elliotthj91 wrote:
The agent/bystander tiles are also of a much lower quality.

They're thinner, and they might bend a little with humidity, but considering that they're just markers that you put on cards to cover them up, it doesn't really matter.
 
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Mike Fuller
Canada
Edmonton
Alberta
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MacMog wrote:

rickfuss wrote:
I noticed the following differences in components:

Codenames includes a sandtimer.
Codenames: Deep Undercover does not include a sandtimer.

Did anybody ever use the timer? Thinking too long was so rarely an issue that I left it in the box, and if it ever became an issue I'd say "any time now... OK, five, four, three, two, one" before I'd bother getting the timer out.

Absolutely! Our group used the timer as a hilarious passive aggressive means of telling a spymaster or team that they were taking too long. It quickly turned into a running gag and we have gotten a lot of use out of that cheap meaningless component addition. It's worth having.
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