Recommend
5 
 Thumb up
 Hide
12 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Everything Else » Chit Chat

Subject: Is there a term for this musical occurence? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Josh
United States
flag msg tools
Nothing happens for a reason, but everything happens by a mechanism
badge
Nitrogen Conservation Awareness: I pee in the yard
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Is there a specific term for the sound of fingers moving over the fretboard of a guitar (or bass)?

Examples:

Lots of them throughout, including early.


Chorus is loaded with them.

Is there a term for this?
Is it more common with guitar or bass?
Electric or acoustic?
From the fact that most songs do not have this, is it something that musicians try to minimize and/or maximize? Is the recording technique changed for this reason? Are sound engineers interested in this?
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
¡dn ʇǝƃ ʇ,uɐɔ ı puɐ uǝllɐɟ ǝʌ,ı
Canada
Chestermere
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
There are 10 kinds of people who understand binary: Those who do, and those who don't.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
If there is a term, I don't know it. But I'll bet that there is.

I *think* that it happens more with wound strings, which is normally the bottom (lowest sounds) 3 or 4 strings on an electric guitar.
The ridges on the wound strings would vibrate more than a plain wire string if you move your finger over them to make a chord change.
I don't think that you can get a bass strung without wound strings, so if my theory is correct then the effect should happen more on a bass than it does on a guitar.
As for acoustic/ electric, you can string acoustic with "gut" strings/ plastic, or wire and wound, but the biggest difference I've noticed is that the distance (vertically) to the fret, that you have to push down on the string. It is further on an acoustic than on an electric, so your fingers do more rubbing on acoustic, and if it is then amplified then the acoustic version should happen more often than pure electric.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
shumyum
United States
flag msg tools
badge
♒♒♒♒♎♒♒♒♒ sloooowly sinking
Avatar
Usually "fret noise" but sometimes (and more accurately IMO) "string noise".

I like to hear it, but for some people it is like knife-on-plate or even fingernails-on-chalkboard and it is very hard to unhear once it's perceived.

7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott McDonald
United States
Oklahoma City
Oklahoma
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
It's from sliding your fingers on the ridges of the strings. Some pickups make the sound more noticeable than others. (single coil vs. humbuckers) The type of string also plays into it, Coated strings should have less slide noise than plain strings typically. It all comes down to how you play, and how you have your Audio set up.

The worst slide noise I've heard was a local Death Metal band where the guitarist had the gain at max level and didn't know how to palm mute.

Quote:
I don't think that you can get a bass strung without wound strings, so if my theory is correct then the effect should happen more on a bass than it does on a guitar.


I use D'Addario flat wound strings on my Basses, so no slide sound.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
¡dn ʇǝƃ ʇ,uɐɔ ı puɐ uǝllɐɟ ǝʌ,ı
Canada
Chestermere
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
There are 10 kinds of people who understand binary: Those who do, and those who don't.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
smcdonald365 wrote:
I use D'Addario flat wound strings on my Basses, so no slide sound.

I've never even heard of flat wound strings-- cool!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott McDonald
United States
Oklahoma City
Oklahoma
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
MABBY wrote:
smcdonald365 wrote:
I use D'Addario flat wound strings on my Basses, so no slide sound.

I've never even heard of flat wound strings-- cool!


Yeah. I started using them on my Fretless since I was wanting an Upright-esque sound. I liked the feel of them enough that I ended up switching all of my basses over. They aren't as bright as round wounds, so if you want something closer to that sound with the feel of flats, half-rounds may work for you.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Todays avatar: Birdy Joe is about 40 years old.
United States
Louisville
Kentucky
flag msg tools
badge
Pet photographer, that's me.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
MABBY wrote:
smcdonald365 wrote:
I use D'Addario flat wound strings on my Basses, so no slide sound.

I've never even heard of flat wound strings-- cool!


I used to have tape wound strings on my Beatle bass copy. Same strings McCartney used on Abbey Road album. That bass is gone but I'm thinking about flat wounds for one of the other two basses.

I'd definitely put flats on a fretless.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jonan Jello
United States
California
flag msg tools
badge
"Its eyes were widening, widening, and in those black pupils, each as big as a softball, Ritchie saw the mad darkness that must exist over the rim of the universe; he saw a shitty happiness that he felt would drive him insane."
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The first song that comes to mind for 'string noise'.
I definitely believe the noise was exploited for full effect for this song. Not sure about the rest of the album.


5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David K.
United States
Pflugerville
Texas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
scribidinus wrote:
MABBY wrote:
smcdonald365 wrote:
I use D'Addario flat wound strings on my Basses, so no slide sound.

I've never even heard of flat wound strings-- cool!


I used to have tape wound strings on my Beatle bass copy. Same strings McCartney used on Abbey Road album. That bass is gone but I'm thinking about flat wounds for one of the other two basses.

I'd definitely put flats on a fretless.


I've never been a fan of flat wound strings. I've always been a round wound guy.

I used to have Roto-sounds on my bass, almost all the time. Right now I've got some D'Addario rounds wounds that I like pretty well.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
TonyKR
United States
Portland
Oregon
flag msg tools
Avatar
Flat-wound and tape-wounds are great for bass, and almost essential for fretless. And apparently flats sound great with a 12-string electric (with just a bit of compression). Never felt like spending the $40-50 bucks for a decent set to find out for myself though.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Howden
United States
San Jose
California
flag msg tools
I believe you have mine...
badge
Bringing you quality product in the face of crushing indifference since 1970.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sometimes I don't mind a bit of squeak in a chord change, depends on the song. Other times I find myself practicing a change just to minimize the possibility of a squeak. I know a clarinet player that can't stand string noise from guitarists. She thinks that it is always a mistake, and shows low skill, but she'll never get a gig so... ninja
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Australia
NSW
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Another flatwound bass player here, on both the fretless (which is more or less essential because otherwise you can damage the fretboard) and on my fretted. Fretless has Labellas and the fretted Roto 77s (from memory... that's the other advantage, less breakage and less changes required!)

I like the feel, but I love the sound which is more conducive to what I enjoy playing. Thump thump thump. You can still get a bit of twang out of them depending on whereabouts you play, setting your levels etc etc.

I don't play heaps either these days so I don't have to work callouses back up too much.


1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.