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Mansions of Madness: Second Edition» Forums » Reviews

Subject: MoM2.0: A Playtester's Review rss

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Chris J Davis
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I don’t often do reviews, and when I do it’s normally only for games that I found so exceptionally unenjoyable that I feel I need to warn the world about them. However, I’m making an exception for Mansions of Madness (Second Edition) for the following reason:

This game is absolutely amazing!

I had the good fortune to be a playtester for this game, so have been playing it for quite a few months now, and so I thought it would also be useful for people to hear from someone who has been playing the game over an extended period (especially in regard to the replayability factor). Let me start off by stating two points:

1) Everyone who I have introduced this game to really loves it.
2) My core gaming group literally never gets bored of playing it; they are always up for another game.

Additionally, I would also like to point out that I am certainly not scared of being critical of games, even (or especially) FFG’s games; my role as a playtester requires me to be critical of them, after all. Although I loved First Edition in concept, I was still very aware of the fact that it suffered from quite a few fatal flaws, and I put a lot of time and energy into attempting to make First Edition into what I felt was the game it really should have been. If anyone is curious, you can check out the exact extent of that time and effort here:

https://boardgamegeek.com/filepage/74620/mansions-madness-fu...

Second Edition, I’m very glad to say, is already the game that First Edition wanted to be (which is lucky for me, because I’m really not sure how I could have modded the app so easily)!

I wouldn’t normally go through the rules of the game, but I’ll give a brief overview here seeing as this is probably going to be one of the very first reviews to be published.

The general flow of the game is very similar to MoM1.0 - you are investigators in a mansion (usually, though it can often be some other environment) trying to solve a mystery, the nature of which is kept quite vague at the start but you learn more as you explore the surroundings. On each investigator’s turn they can perform any two of the following actions:

- Move (up to two spaces)
- Explore
- Search
- Interact (with an object or a person)

- Attack
- Trade (which includes picking up items in your space)
- Perform an action written on a component

The three actions in bold above are all essentially the same and involve interacting with a different type of token on the board that correlates to a matching token in the app. The app will then tell you what the result is of performing your action.

There are also some actions that come under the category of “rarely used actions” (because most of them are typically only used when someone has gone insane):

- Set fire (only if you have a light source)
- Steal
- Push (another investigator or monster)

Finally, there’s a couple of actions related to components included in the base game that can be performed:

- Put out fire
- Move barricade

Once all investigators have taken their turn, the app then goes through three steps: mythos events (generic, scenario-specific or both), monster activations, and horror checks (for investigators who are near monsters).

Investigators can gain helpful items and clue tokens throughout their investigation, the latter of these allowing them to improve the results of their dice rolls. Investigators will also accrue damage and horror cards throughout their investigation, some of them facedown (which just count as one generic point of damage/horror), some of them faceup (which still count as a point of damage/horror but with the possibility of an ongoing detriment).

If an investigator gains damage equal to his health he becomes Wounded (can’t perform the Move action more than once per turn) and discards all of his facedown damage. If he gains damage equal to his health a second time, he is killed.

Insanity works similarly, though the effect of going Insane is arguably more detrimental (and more fun) than becoming Wounded; gaining an Insanity card (which you are not allowed to reveal to the other investigators) may change your win condition, or cause you to behave in strange ways. Possible effects include (from memory):

Spoiler (click to reveal)
- There must be at least 8 fire tokens on the board when the game ends for you to win.
- You (the player) may not speak.
- If you start your turn in a space containing exactly one other investigator and you are carrying a bladed weapon, the game immediately ends; you win and all other players lose.


As with damage, if an investigator gains horror equal to their sanity a second time, they are killed. If any investigator is killed, then the remaining investigators have one final round to complete the investigation. If they fail to do so, the game ends and they all lose.

There are four scenarios included with the base game, all of them quite different from each other. The titles are:

- Cycle of Eternity
- Escape from Innsmouth
- Shattered Bonds
- Rising Tide

A brief synopsis of each:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Cycle of Eternity - good, standard starting scenario; something unnatural is going on in the mansion, and you must find out what it is and stop it.

Escape from Innsmouth - as the name implies, the investigators are trapped in Innsmouth where the residents are getting unruly and must find a way to escape.

Shattered Bonds - a family is being haunted by a spectral creature; you must protect the family and find a way to banish the creature for good.

Rising Tide - someone is performing a supernatural ritual in Innsmouth, and you have six suspects on your list; you must talk to the locals to determine who is responsible and stop them.


So here are some answers to some common questions I’ve seen on the message boards over the past couple of weeks:

So what exactly does the app handle?

Quite a lot. It essentially handles everything the keeper used to do in MoM1.0, acts as an interactive quest guide, holds most information relating to any clues you might uncover, handles puzzles for you and takes care of a few fiddly admin tasks (such as monster health and combat).

The app does not know anything relating to the positions of the players on the board (it only knows which rooms have been “explored”), the state of the investigators, or the positions of items and monsters.

Even though there is no keeper, one player will still essentially be acting as the DM/administrator for everything the keeper would normally do, so if for some reason you’re averse to that idea, then this may be an issue for you. However, I’ve never minded being in this role for every game that I’ve played (I actually rather enjoy it, as you get to be both the storyteller and an investigator at the same time). And even if you are averse to the idea, the app is easy enough to use that you could just give it to another player to administrate.

It does also mean that the app is on constantly for an extended period and will absolutely kill your battery. Shorter scenarios you should be able to get through on a single charge, but the longer scenarios will require your tablet to be plugged into a mains socket or external battery while playing, so this may also be a consideration (though again, for us it was never a problem).

What is the setup like? Is it shorter compared to First Edition?

Thankfully, much shorter. Setup for First Edition used to take me around 45 minutes. Setup for Second Edition takes literally five minutes. Rules also take no more than five minutes. You can just explain the basics and start playing. As it’s cooperative, you can introduce any of the more fiddly rules as they come up.

How random are the maps? Might I encounter a forest in the middle of the mansion?

I think the FFG copywriters were a little over-zealous with their use of the word “random” in the previews. I don’t know exactly how the map-generation aspect of the app works, but for the most part the maps are more of variations on a theme rather than completely procedurally-generated maps. They are certainly not completely random - the maps always “make sense”. And there is at least one scenario we’ve played where the layout of the map tiles has never changed between games, so it may be that for some scenarios one map is all you get (but other aspects of the scenario will often change to make up for this).

How cohesive are the stories? And how is the investigative aspect of the game? Is this now just Lovecraft-Descent?

The stories are much more cohesive than they ever were (or ever could be) in First Edition. Events always take place in the proper order, and there can be many more (and more intricate) event dependencies than in First Edition (or in any other board game at all, really). There is a lot more flavour text describing the story; even every clue token you gain comes with some accompanying flavour text that really is a clue as to what is going on. Additionally, every Search and Interact token now correlates directly to artwork on the map along with a short snippet of flavour text describing it, and that really helps with the thematic immersion. It also provides more sense to the sort of things you might find in particular places, so searching now provides slightly more predictable results compared to the often random crap-shoot of MoM1.0.

For example, there might be a search token placed on the image of a cupboard on the board, and the app will tell you “a locked cupboard stands at the end of the hall”; you know the cupboard is locked, so you will probably need to either do a Strength test to force it open, or maybe have someone with high Observation or Agility solve a puzzle to pick the lock. If your investigator’s strengths are Influence, Will or Lore, then you’re probably not the right person to search the cupboard.

The investigative aspect varies from scenario to scenario, though in general they are all a step above the MoM1.0 base game form of investigation (find clue, follow clue to next clue, rinse, repeat). Instead of forming a clue chain, the clues offered in MoM2.0 will provide hints to the players as to what they need to do to win. I’d say the investigation aspect is on par with how clues worked in the Call of the Wild expansion for MoM1.0, though obviously the app can handle this much better.

There is even one scenario that is almost completely monster-free and based entirely around discovering clues and putting them together to determine the right way to win (and it’s not as boring as watching paint dry like the monster-free scenario from First Edition). So, yes - I think the investigative aspect is still there (and improved), and no - this is definitely not Lovecraft-Descent.

Saying that, this isn’t Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective either. The investigative/deductive aspect is for the most part still relatively basic, with most clues being more of a revealing of the ongoing story with some slight direction as to what you need to do to win. Your deductive abilities won’t be tested to their limits, though there’s no reason that more difficult clue-based scenarios couldn’t be created in the future.

Some people have also deplored the fact that the important scenario-specific evidence/clue items have been replaced with generic forms in this version of the game. What those people are missing is that the app can now provide the clues itself; you might find an Old Journal card that just has some generic flavour text written on the card itself, but in the app the flavour text changes depending on what is going on in the scenario. Some important items will appear in the app’s “investigator inventory” (only used for some rare, important items), and can be referenced by interacting with them in the app.

So what is the replayability really like?

Well, like I said, we’ve never got bored of playing this game. A lot of the replayability comes from the fact that you probably won’t win each scenario the first time (except maybe the much easier ones) because you won’t know what’s going on or what you need to do to win. The next time you play the same scenario, you might have a slightly better idea of what to do, but things have changed enough to not make it as simple as just retracing your steps from the first time.

However, saying that, the scenarios are not infinitely variable; you will eventually see pretty much everything a scenario has to offer. But in my opinion, that is the nature of scenario-based games, and at least this one has methods to mix each scenario up a bit so you’re never quite sure what to expect. And even once you know all the options for every scenario off by heart, the randomisation of the starting items, randomised items scattered around the map, your choice of investigators, randomised monsters and the luck of your dice rolls still makes those scenarios fun and different to play each time.

And, of course, there’s the inevitable expansion scenarios to keep things fresh.

So in summary, in the opinion of this reviewer, FFG have hit the nail on the head and have created the game that First Edition Mansions of Madness always wanted to be but couldn’t achieve due to the limitations of the media used at the time. For me, this game is the supreme Lovecraft game, mixing mystery, exploration, horror and suspense in one beautifully wrapped and thematic package.

100% wholeheartedly recommended.
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J P
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Heh. I had a suspicion that you were s playtester based on your posts. Thanks for the review. This game sounds awesome! I didn't think I could get more excited for this game, but after reading this I am!
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The scenarios "normally" go for point A to point B, for the story purpose, but between in the middle can be really crazy . The "random" aspects are there: monsters (I am jealous first edition owners, so jealous cry), items, mythos effects, puzzles, story ramifications, etc, the myriad of events you can get are so great, you cannot think to get tired with this.

And for the ones who loves role playing, the insanity cards are amazing, it's so much fun when the players incorporates the madness
 
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bleached_lizard wrote:
I’d say the investigation aspect is on par with how clues worked in the Call of the Wild expansion for MoM1.0


Would you please elaborate on how the clues work for those of us that didn't play the expansion? Thanks


 
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Jonathan Scott
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Great review, thanks! It answered a few questions I had. As an owner of all first edition expansions my main hope now is that if FFG rerelease call of the wild and forbidden alchemy with new 2E scenarios that they will work with the old ones as well ( I.e. That I won't have to repurchase CotW to be able to play new scenarios).

One question - did you play test the conversion kit with the old material? Did the old tiles come up often? I imagine they could significantly increase the variety of the "randomness" of the layout.
 
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Enon Sci
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Fantastic review.

It left me grinning ear to ear.
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Fantastic review, Chris. Thank you so much for more and deeper insight!

However, one thing that all the reviews could not answer me is my question regarding stories or plot unfolding in the game. Maybe you can help shed a little more light on that.

Let me explain what I mean by that - in comparison to MoM 1.0. Despite all its flaws (and there were a lot), it had one thing going for it (for me) - each scenario had not only one, but three (let's call them, for the moment) plots. These were hinged on the chain of clues - or, rather, on the decisions the keeper made while setting up.
Now, most often, these were only decisions of where something was to be found, and you as well as other reviewers have pointed out that this is where the app does its variation thing - maybe this time it is not the key you need, but the burning chimpanzee, and maybe this time it is not hidden in the pantry, but in the Dark Room.
Also, it was pointed out that the app would vary things in-between, depending on which "side-quest" you would unlock, how you would talk to an NPC, etc.

However, it always sounded to me like each scenario had one central plot, or story, with a hook to rope in the characters (i.e. the introduction), a spine (the basic outline of what you need to accomplish the victory) and a conclusion (reveal of motive, culprit, and "what's really going on", along with a final scene/solution/goal). A story that is always the same underneath. The paths in the middle might lead you to different parts of the stage, and you might find different props there, or need different things to go on, but they would inevitably lead to the same bottleneck at the end, where the context reveal would ultimately be the same, and the result of the game would depend on how well you solved the riddles on the way.

As I understand it, there would not be a "witch summoning a monster" this time, "Old Man Garrety creating a mutating virus" the next and "the real estate agent having a heart attack in the house" in the third iteration as the reason for why there is "a light on every night in the vacant house on the hill". It would always be the witch summoning a monster. And it would always be the investigators needing to have found out enough about the situation to perform a counter spell.

I love that there is the possibility for different outcomes, but in mechanical terms, that seems to me like it only means a differentiation between "you were not fast enough", "you did not get everything you need", "you made a wrong decision along the way because you did not pay attention" and "you did everything right, and avoided the traps". And I hope to god it is not a "you talked to Gary - noone should talk to Gary" kind of T.I.M.E Stories variation, where you have to replay a scenario simply because you chose A instead of B (without any discerning information) or went down a dead end too many and lost too much time that way...

I guess what I am saying is "is the variation in the game, and the replayability "only" based on mechanical aspects wrapped in story, or does the story itself change"?

Because that is the biggest fear I have with a scenario not having more than one objective. I am a story man at heart, and as much as I enjoy mechanisms and mechanical variability in (non-story-driven) games, in story-driven exploratory games I want and need more than just one story to unfold. Whenever that story has been told once, it loses its lustre for me. If there are several possibilities in the way a story can go (or end), then there is still a "mystery" to be solved. But if the mystery is not the story, but only the "how to get through and solve it best way possible", then all stories are basically "one, and done" situations for me.

Let me briefly compare it to the old "choose your own adventure" books. Sure, they were fun. Sure, if you failed to reach the end, you would start again (or I would). But once I reached the end, I would NEVER pick up that book again. There might have been multiple paths not taken, to be explored in between. But once the ending was clear, I lost any interest. Basically, a perfect and most direct run-through of one of these books would be the worst thing that could happen to me, because it would kill the incentive to pick it up ever again, and I would have lost the opportunity to learn side-quests, dead-ends, etc.
...and I fear that a certain similarity to that situation is what is waiting for me in the MoM 2.0 scenarios (those that have been published so far).

Many, many words. But I don't know how I could have explained it simpler, with less words. I hope you understand where I'm coming from, and can shed some light on this, regarding my concerns...
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Randolph Bookman
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Does mom2.0 just let you use your old investigators, monsters and and tiles? Can you play any of the 1.0 scenarios?
 
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shieldwolf wrote:
Does mom2.0 just let you use your old investigators, monsters and and tiles? Can you play any of the 1.0 scenarios?

Yes, but only the investigator FIGURES, the monster FIGURES and the tiles (new investigator cards and monster tokens are in the conversion kit).
No to the second answer - as long as there are no new implementations of these stories (along with adapted cards etc.), the old scenarios are solely playable with MoM 1.0!
 
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Julia
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Dumon,

Allow me to make a general example so possibly it's easier to get how the app work. Let's say you're investigating a cult and need to find the cult leader among a pool of suspects. The app determines who's the leader at the start of the adventure and you need to I vestige and use your reasoning to get the right dude. This makes the scenario different every time you play because you can't repeat the same strategy to get the same target.

Or you could be asked to save Mr Ward from some bizarre possession. Maybe you can find a way to save him before it's too late, or maybe you have to kill him before he endangered the world.

In the first example you have different plot evolution, in the second you're working against a timer. Often in Mansions 2 you may have both.

Hope this helps (examples made are just made up to avoid spoiling the fun for others)
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fpvillalobos wrote:
bleached_lizard wrote:
I’d say the investigation aspect is on par with how clues worked in the Call of the Wild expansion for MoM1.0


Would you please elaborate on how the clues work for those of us that didn't play the expansion? Thanks




Clues in MoM 2 can be used in two ways:

- for each clue you spend you may change an investigation result you just rolled into a success result
- for each clue you spend while resolving a puzzle, you gain an extra puzzle action (id est, you may move one more piece of the puzzle)
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Hahaha!

Thank you, Julia, for providing a little more insight. I was thinking about whether to post the question here, with Chris' review, or in your thread (where you provided an absolutely fantastic review, aswell - thank you for that!). Ultimately, it became this thread. How funny that YOU now are the first to address my concerns, here...


Now I hope I can snag the game for a decent price (or one I'm willing to pay), because now I really want to play/own it...
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Chris J Davis
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kraisto wrote:
And for the ones who loves role playing, the insanity cards are amazing, it's so much fun when the players incorporates the madness


I agree that the Insanities are one of the most fun aspects of the game.
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Chris J Davis
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fpvillalobos wrote:
bleached_lizard wrote:
I’d say the investigation aspect is on par with how clues worked in the Call of the Wild expansion for MoM1.0


Would you please elaborate on how the clues work for those of us that didn't play the expansion? Thanks




Just to clarify, in this context I'm talking about the clue cards rather than the clue tokens (which I think were actually called Skill tokens in 1st Ed).

In the 1st Ed base game, the clues always formed a "chain", with one clue telling you where to go to find the next clue, and so on.

In CotW, the clues would instead normally tell you what you needed to do in order to win. In a couple of scenarios, each clue would eliminate a choice from the specific combination of items you needed to posses/actions you needed to perform in order to win. In other scenarios, I think getting a certain number of clues revealed the objective.

Clues in 2nd Ed work more like the latter, though in general there are more of them and they each drip-feed you a little piece of information about what is going on. Some clues give you direct information relating to what you need to do to win.
 
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Chris J Davis
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Roden84 wrote:
Great review, thanks! It answered a few questions I had. As an owner of all first edition expansions my main hope now is that if FFG rerelease call of the wild and forbidden alchemy with new 2E scenarios that they will work with the old ones as well ( I.e. That I won't have to repurchase CotW to be able to play new scenarios).

One question - did you play test the conversion kit with the old material? Did the old tiles come up often? I imagine they could significantly increase the variety of the "randomness" of the layout.


I own all of 1st Ed, so yes - we used the Conversion Kit. Info on 1E tiles used below:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
I'm pretty certain both Cycle of Eternity and Shattered Bonds have alternate maps that use 1E tiles.
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Great review Chris, honest and addressing most people concerns.

I believe the Investigative part of the game has been handled in the best possible way for a game of this characteristics (although I will tell when I finally get to play it). I love that clue tokens actually give you real clues about the mystery and not just a token, as well as how the Evidence cards have so much app story content in them.

Do you see the Campaign possibility coming true some day?
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Dumon wrote:
Hahaha!

Thank you, Julia, for providing a little more insight. I was thinking about whether to post the question here, with Chris' review, or in your thread (where you provided an absolutely fantastic review, aswell - thank you for that!). Ultimately, it became this thread. How funny that YOU now are the first to address my concerns, here...


Now I hope I can snag the game for a decent price (or one I'm willing to pay), because now I really want to play/own it...


Happy I helped! And no mystery, Chris and I gave a 2 hour time shift due to living in different countries, so...
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Dumon wrote:
Fantastic review, Chris. Thank you so much for more and deeper insight!

However, one thing that all the reviews could not answer me is my question regarding stories or plot unfolding in the game. Maybe you can help shed a little more light on that.

Let me explain what I mean by that - in comparison to MoM 1.0. Despite all its flaws (and there were a lot), it had one thing going for it (for me) - each scenario had not only one, but three (let's call them, for the moment) plots. These were hinged on the chain of clues - or, rather, on the decisions the keeper made while setting up.
Now, most often, these were only decisions of where something was to be found, and you as well as other reviewers have pointed out that this is where the app does its variation thing - maybe this time it is not the key you need, but the burning chimpanzee, and maybe this time it is not hidden in the pantry, but in the Dark Room.
Also, it was pointed out that the app would vary things in-between, depending on which "side-quest" you would unlock, how you would talk to an NPC, etc.

However, it always sounded to me like each scenario had one central plot, or story, with a hook to rope in the characters (i.e. the introduction), a spine (the basic outline of what you need to accomplish the victory) and a conclusion (reveal of motive, culprit, and "what's really going on", along with a final scene/solution/goal). A story that is always the same underneath. The paths in the middle might lead you to different parts of the stage, and you might find different props there, or need different things to go on, but they would inevitably lead to the same bottleneck at the end, where the context reveal would ultimately be the same, and the result of the game would depend on how well you solved the riddles on the way.

As I understand it, there would not be a "witch summoning a monster" this time, "Old Man Garrety creating a mutating virus" the next and "the real estate agent having a heart attack in the house" in the third iteration as the reason for why there is "a light on every night in the vacant house on the hill". It would always be the witch summoning a monster. And it would always be the investigators needing to have found out enough about the situation to perform a counter spell.

I love that there is the possibility for different outcomes, but in mechanical terms, that seems to me like it only means a differentiation between "you were not fast enough", "you did not get everything you need", "you made a wrong decision along the way because you did not pay attention" and "you did everything right, and avoided the traps". And I hope to god it is not a "you talked to Gary - noone should talk to Gary" kind of T.I.M.E Stories variation, where you have to replay a scenario simply because you chose A instead of B (without any discerning information) or went down a dead end too many and lost too much time that way...

I guess what I am saying is "is the variation in the game, and the replayability "only" based on mechanical aspects wrapped in story, or does the story itself change"?

Because that is the biggest fear I have with a scenario not having more than one objective. I am a story man at heart, and as much as I enjoy mechanisms and mechanical variability in (non-story-driven) games, in story-driven exploratory games I want and need more than just one story to unfold. Whenever that story has been told once, it loses its lustre for me. If there are several possibilities in the way a story can go (or end), then there is still a "mystery" to be solved. But if the mystery is not the story, but only the "how to get through and solve it best way possible", then all stories are basically "one, and done" situations for me.

Let me briefly compare it to the old "choose your own adventure" books. Sure, they were fun. Sure, if you failed to reach the end, you would start again (or I would). But once I reached the end, I would NEVER pick up that book again. There might have been multiple paths not taken, to be explored in between. But once the ending was clear, I lost any interest. Basically, a perfect and most direct run-through of one of these books would be the worst thing that could happen to me, because it would kill the incentive to pick it up ever again, and I would have lost the opportunity to learn side-quests, dead-ends, etc.
...and I fear that a certain similarity to that situation is what is waiting for me in the MoM 2.0 scenarios (those that have been published so far).

Many, many words. But I don't know how I could have explained it simpler, with less words. I hope you understand where I'm coming from, and can shed some light on this, regarding my concerns...


Julia has already addressed this in the most part, but if you want specifics for each of the scenarios, click the spoilers below:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
- Cycle of Eternity has a few different maps. Additionally, I'm pretty certain it has a few different objectives; the majority of the story throughout the scenario will remain the same, but once you get to the finale, things may change (maybe not by a huge amount, but it can potentially go one of a few different ways). The outcome can also be different depending on how well you handle things.

- Escape from Innsmouth is the most static of all the scenarios. It only has one map, and things will play out for the most part the same in each play-through (barring the random aspects of all scenarios). However, it's also probably the most difficult of the scenarios, so you certainly won't win it the first time, and even on repeat plays it should still provide a challenge.

- Shattered Bonds has at least a couple of different maps (at least if you have 1st Ed stuff). However, the main objective and strategy remains mostly the same from game to game. It's also quite challenging.

- Rising Tide also only has one map. However, the guilty suspects will be different from play to play, and some lines of questioning in some cases will provide you with more information than in other cases. You probably also won't get the best ending on your first play through.
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Scarlet Witch wrote:
fpvillalobos wrote:
bleached_lizard wrote:
I’d say the investigation aspect is on par with how clues worked in the Call of the Wild expansion for MoM1.0


Would you please elaborate on how the clues work for those of us that didn't play the expansion? Thanks




Clues in MoM 2 can be used in two ways:

- for each clue you spend you may change an investigation result you just rolled into a success result
- for each clue you spend while resolving a puzzle, you gain an extra puzzle action (id est, you may move one more piece of the puzzle)


Just to clarify, I think the person you were responding to was talking about actual textual clues rather than clue tokens.
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Thank you, Chris, for your additional information. I think I'll take the plunge, as soon as I find it for a decent price (here in Germany, it will not be easy to get it cheap(er) than list price, and that is about $112 (calculated from Euros to $).


Ah, we'll see!
 
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Hey Chris! Just curious, when it comes to the flavor text/actions that monsters and investigators take via the app, did you very often have repeats for horror check flavor or attack flavor? Because I know the attacks in the base game could get repetitive depending on how many monsters there were, and how many weapon types you had at your disposal.

I've been wondering this since I saw that there were flavor texts for even horror checks in the app. Truly excited either way, but just wondering whether you had many duplicate experiences during fights/monster interactions.
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Acererak wrote:
Great review Chris, honest and addressing most people concerns.

I believe the Investigative part of the game has been handled in the best possible way for a game of this characteristics (although I will tell when I finally get to play it). I love that clue tokens actually give you real clues about the mystery and not just a token, as well as how the Evidence cards have so much app story content in them.

Do you see the Campaign possibility coming true some day?


I'd say it's certainly possible, though unlikely just because it's outside the scope of this game.
 
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soakman wrote:
Hey Chris! Just curious, when it comes to the flavor text/actions that monsters and investigators take via the app, did you very often have repeats for horror check flavor or attack flavor? Because I know the attacks in the base game could get repetitive depending on how many monsters there were, and how many weapon types you had at your disposal.

I've been wondering this since I saw that there were flavor texts for even horror checks in the app. Truly excited either way, but just wondering whether you had many duplicate experiences during fights/monster interactions.


Yes, you do sometimes see repeats coming up, though it's not too often.
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Hey Chris,
Spoiler (click to reveal)

Isn't Rising Tide the scenario where you have to clear the board at different times and visit other places? Because you said, it's only "one map".
 
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Spoilers!

Spoiler (click to reveal)

Although you visit different locations, those locations are always the same. That's what I was talking about in that context.
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