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The Lord of the Rings: The Card Game» Forums » General

Subject: How do you play quests rss

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Linio Shay
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Hi.

I had a quick question.
Whenever you buy new content and play new quests, do you analyse beforehand the whole quest, cards, monsters or go in totally unaware of what lies ahead?

I've been disappointed by one of my purchase, and now want to see whatever I'm buying, but I was curious of how the community handles their games.
 
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Tristan Hall
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Gloom of Kilforth reprint Kickstarter Sept 29-Oct 31
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Play once, lose, rebuild deck, lose again, repeat. sauron
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Richie Freeman
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I look at all the player cards, but actively try to avoid looking at all the encounter cards of each expansions - much prefer everything to be a surprise the first time I play it.
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mark williams
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Read the buyers guide from Tales of the cards, it will give you some idea about the quest and how he rates it. I am sure given the volume of AP's, Saga's and Deluxe boxes there are going to be quests you don't like but you also get to build your card pool
https://talesfromthecards.wordpress.com/2013/09/13/new-playe...
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Slamin Perfect
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I always play the quests blind. If I need to tweak I prefer to do it from memory of what destroyed us the first few times around also.
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Eric Christensen
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My GF and I play blind on new quests. We take whatever decks we'd been playing recently and see if we can make that deck work in whatever the scenario is. We will quite often fail, and then we start building the deck towards beating the current quest. For many people who play this game, there is a core mechanic of building your deck to beat the puzzle that is the quest scenario and that core mechanic is part of the fun in playing the game. Other people are really into building the perfect deck that blaze through every scenario with very minor tweaks. Either way though, if you don't think you'll like constructing decks to beat whatever scenario is in front of you, this game probably isn't your cup of tea.

I have used various online resources when making my purchases and my decisions have been based on acquiring good player cards to build with. I don't really pay attention to what the encounters are in the sets. So I have quite a number of scenarios right now that I haven't even attempted yet. Some are better than others. Some I really loathe. The first scenario for The Hobbit Over Hill and Under Hill most recently really was a pain in my neck to beat. We ultimately built really good decks to handle things, but for some reason, the journey to get there was quite punishing. We let out a long sigh after winning rather than a high five and smiles. That's just how the game goes sometimes.
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Jay Cockrell
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I agree with the others, there are some quests that have been "meh" to me but I love to go in blind. After the first game, sometimes, I need to rebuild almost an entire new deck BUT, I like the deck building and finding cool combos.

Another thing you can do, is when you build your "all-comers" deck that is ok at handling most situations, build a side-board of cards that are situational so that you can remove less useful cards for questing and insert allies for combat *as an example* if the quest is combat heavy.

My gf LOVES eagles... ... ... anyways, she has a very combat intensive deck and we have decided to do the fellowship campaign, the first mission is 80% questing 20% nasty combat with ring wraiths. After our first loss I changed out combat Merry for Spirit Fatty and dramatically increased our survival.

Sorry, this may have been an excessive answer but, I believe adaptability is key to enjoying this game, that and the surprises that come in quests. Such as top-decking your second hill troll on Journey down the Anduin, epic loss.
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Lee Broderick
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I always go in blind. It's actually nice to see so many people here doing the same after a contrary comment elsewhere on BGG in the last day or two.
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Jeff Kayati
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I like to read the quest cards so I know what to expect. I only look at the encounter cards enough to remove the gold circle cards. I play on Easy Mode until I beat the quest, then normal mode.

This approach has greatly improved my enjoyment level of the game.
 
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Reloc 8
Ireland
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I am new as they come to the game but my assumption was that I should not read Quest or Encounter cards before playing. I'm interested that there is a contrary school of thought as it seemed to me to be in my own best interests (maximising fun and replay) to go blind.
 
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Jules
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Personally, I like knowing a little bit about the quest beforehand, but only so much as 'this is a questing heavy quest' or 'this is a combat heavy quest' or even 'this is a siege quest'. This helps me to understand which of my personal decks I should use so that I don't face immediate defeat and waste the time setting up. However, I usually achieve this not by looking at the cards, but by asking other players, that way the actual game play is still a surprise and very fun, while still feeling like I might have a chance of survival. Not that the decks I choose based on the little tidbit I got always win by any means. Then I alter for the quest itself after playing from my knowledge of the things that particularly killed me. So I guess I'm a hybrid of the play styles. I like limited knowledge so I'm not so utterly crushed as to loose interest/pack up the game for the day, but not enough that it spoils the surprise of the quest.
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Hedyn Brand
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Oslo
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Nothing to see here. Move along.
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If I haven't managed to sleeve my quests blindly before I play them, I play-sleeve: Shuffle in an automatic shuffle for a bit, start playing and sleeve them as I draw cards. What's the fun in knowing everything ahead?
 
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Daniel Wilmer
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1. Glance longingly at a box of unopened quests sitting pregnant with dark promise.

2. Peer at a chosen quest packs' title art and link it hungrily to the implied quest. Wracked with questions of what card the art refers to.

3. Pensively turn to the quest pack over, devour the blurb and further card art. Question which hero's would be best placed to tackle this sort of endeavour.

4. Use to QR code to see the contents. Grin with joy at a new hero, um and ah how they might be used. Slowly scroll tremulously at each new sphere offering. Consider rebuilding a deck to use as many of the new cards as possible.

5.Hit the first quest card 1a and read it. Avoid reading the rest. Decide that the tuned player deck from my last quest would be best suited to my first attempt.

6.Cautiously open the packaging, being sure to prevent dark energies mauling the precious precious slivers of light and dark within.

7. Grin at the new hero with renewed joy and decide they must be part of this quest. Refuse to remove the plastic wrapping.

8. Tease apart the folded title paper to remove the special rules summary sheet. Reread the scenario and curse myself for paying to much attention to the new rules that threaten to break the immersion by focusing on mechanics over theme.

9. Delicately remove the cards protective plastic releasing a waft of factory air, transported many miles to diffuse within seconds into my own home. Question the waste in my hobby and resent myself for being human and embroiled the inescapable self destructive behaviour that leads to mass produced desireables, using resources (organic and inorganic) at a rate that far outstrips their natural recovery.

10. Feel the gloss and glimmmer of crisply cut hero resting on the new sphere and encounter cards, the heat of excitement convecting away the clinging but vapid existential guilt of point 9.

11. Cautiously sleeve all cards, cursing any encounter card that gets revealed as it creates fireworks of deck preparation ideas flood unbridled, threatening to prevent the excitement exploring the unknown.

12. Draw off the relevant encounter decks to mix in with the quest encounter deck, remembering all the dastardly encounter cards that caused so much despair returning again to hound my poor heroes with new and uncertain interactions.

13. Revise a new hero and player deck, flip-flopping between just using the last deck played and incorporate new cards just obtained. Become paralysed by indecision, sift through cards so much I cant remember exactly what was in my previous quest player deck. Start from scratch with heroes I want to use. Build deck around them, realise cards working with the heroes don't synergise well. Rebuild again into something remarkably similar to before I even started building with less cards from the new cards than planned.

14. Set up the play surface, reorder the heroes so they look comfortable with each other, realise they never will, consider briefly rebuilding deck again before laughing at my foolishness.

15. Read quest 1a out loud and follow starting instructions.

16. Read quest 1b out loud, follow any instructions.

17. Play with an intensity that consumes minutes rapidly with little care for your ageing body - stooped over characters and monsters locked in an elegant ballet of cause and effect.

18. Realise that the neutral cards had not been shuffled in and Gandalf will never be coming to the rescue. Deal with this loss by taking wild risks with shadow cards that seem to keep going in my favour.

19. Become overwhelmed by the encounter through death or threat, lost in the wilderness of Middle Earth.

20. Return to the weighty collection of cards, dream of a universal storage solution and consider how in the world to make this quest work.

21. Decide it was just bad luck and play the same deck again this time including neutral cards.

22. Scratch head and rethink a deck properly considering cards on mechanical merit rather than theme.

23. Gain palpable progress that is beaten back by the quest progressing further and rules changing again.

24. Slowly tune a deck to victory. Consider how different heroes and spheres would fare before...

1. Glance longingly at a box of unopened quests sitting pregnant with dark promise.


Clearly between each step some time can pass.
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Joe
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I'm a newer player...have played through several old scenarios as well as some newer content. At first I liked the idea of being surprised but I think now I prefer to research the encounter deck and quest cards first, at least to some extent. I enjoy building a deck for a specific scenario anyway, and I'd rather know ahead of time if I/we can no longer do a fundamental game-framework thing. That said, even with research there was a small surprise in a recent 2P play-through of a scenario, that was kind-of fun I guess.
 
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Dudeman Blarg
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I like to read the encounter cards as I sleeve them. Just to get an idea of what to expect and enjoyment seeing all the new cards. But I forget 99% of them 5 seconds later haha. And then when I do finally play the quest (sometimes months after the fact), I'm effectively playing blind. laugh
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David Ainsworth
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I go in blind, and use one of my thematic decks that matches the scenario. I usually play three games with those decks. If I haven't beaten it after three plays I might swap my decks out for a different deck and then go with that, unless it's been really close and then I'll play a couple more games.

I don't tweak decks based on scenario other than bringing in other preconstructed decks, and haven't really found I needed to.
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Dr Johnson
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Play blind and then tweak deck.

I also have a bunch of thematic decks - my current favourite is a Treebeard, Merry, Pippin combo with just Hobbits, Ents & related events/attachments in the deck. Lot of fun to play, but doesn't win all the time though.
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Daniel Merrill
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I look at the scenario cards and maybe glance through the encounter deck so that I am clear on the various triggers that come up. Otherwise, I tend to miss a trigger or two.

Then I start. So the scenario is mostly a surprise.
 
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