Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
6 Posts

War of the Ring (Second Edition)» Forums » General

Subject: similar battle mechanic in other games? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
vagelis
Greece
Πειραιάς
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm a huge fan of war of the ring because i love the theame and for another reason .....his battle system!!!
DICE units siege towns heroes all these make each battle unique.
I wonder if there is any other(s) game(s) with similar battle system??Does anyone know?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew Poulter
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
You are probably aware of the The Battle of Five Armies

It uses the War of the ring combat mechanics as a starting point and then adds more.

As for something closer to the original, I am not aware of anything.
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Daniel Blumentritt
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
What part of the battle system? Every single component of it was done somewhere else first (not a bad thing), although it's the only one I can think of that uses all those same elements together.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Atanasije Stojkovic
Serbia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
The Battle of Five Armies is the game with the best combat system I've seen so far and it is very innovative, unlike the WoR.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Aron
Netherlands
flag msg tools
Life is game, you gotta enjoy the journey.
badge
Life may knock you down sometimes. Its up to you if you stand up and live your life to the fullest.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sargeras777 wrote:
The Battle of Five Armies is the game with the best combat system I've seen so far and it is very innovative, unlike the WoR.


How does it work?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Atanasije Stojkovic
Serbia
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Arontje wrote:
Sargeras777 wrote:
The Battle of Five Armies is the game with the best combat system I've seen so far and it is very innovative, unlike the WoR.


How does it work?


An army doesn't directly suffer losses as a result of a round of combat or by some form of a calamity, but rather endures strikes which are in-game represented through damage tokens. The amount of hits an army can endure equals the number of units that comprise it, which necessarily means that the bigger an army is the more damage it can sustain, representing the injured within the army (let's say sent into the back and replaced with the reserves), broken ranks and and an overall morale penalty at the same time.

Hits are actually suffered with mass casualties and desertions only if the number of damage tokens exceeds the number of figures in the army, after which damage has got to be resolved by removing 1 of the army's figures from play and discarding 2 damage tokens from the army's current stack.

Aside from recruitment, the Muster Action Die can be used for the Rally action. Rally works, in terms of gameplay, in a pretty much the same way as attacking during combat, but with the result being the other way around (discarding damage); that sort of represents regrouping the broken ranks, restoring morale to the forces, healing the wounded and rallying back survivors from the previous fights in the vicinity.

This creates an incredibly interesting and tense gameplay mechanic in which a huge army composed of strong units with quite a number of hits taken is a potential disaster, as just a few hits can inflict tremendous casualties. This brings forth the incentive to retreat when suffering serious hits on one hand and chase down battered troops, as crashing down on them with full impact may simply just almost wipe out the entire army like a knife cleaving through butter. On the other hand, a fresh force with no zero hits can, realistically, fight to full capacity (with no impact on combat dice) for quite a bit of rounds before they even feel the first scratch.

That way, an army with a lot of hits can stay out of combat for a while in order to recover; if it manages to do that with a few musters and perhaps some cards that remove damage tokens or boost rallying a big army can return to full capacity it was a turn or two ago (without actually drawing in any reinforcements to the front lines as fresh recruits), in a manner of saying quite realistically. This also raises the importance of Leadership in this game, as Leader re-rolls aren't just being used for fighting, since they are just as important for rallying.

The whole system opens up for a number of very interesting strategies that may be taken, including intentionally resolving damage for a strategic purpose, or maybe even "devour" friendlies. You're disbanding some weak troops in order to protect stronger units. I've done that playing as the Shadow Player once; there was a big army filled with strong units and my opponent just kept throwing down everything at it in an attempt to destroy it. In the end I've had 5 damage tokens and, surrounded by enemies, it was just about the time I got swarmed since I was overstretched and the Free People's Forces were strong and ready to attack. So, without some good cards to restore hit points and no remaining Musters available, I just brought the army into a neighboring army of Goblins (which was also at minimal health, so potentially not quite useful; also those mountain cave-Orcs are just about the weakest unit type in the entire game so no major loss there). It instantly healed my entire army my opponent had used so much effort to hit and the look on his face when I did that (ordinarily not useful, so unexpected) move. It also made quite a thematic scene, with the mighty great Orcs of Gundobad devouring those puny, probably mortally-wounded Goblins for supper in order to get back their much-needed strength.

In the end, I'll just add, as if I hadn't ranted about the damage system enough already, the damage is also important during retreating. An ordinary retreat is only possible if the "regroup" card is played at the start of the round of combat (a card that both players always have) which yields for that round of fighting no effect in itself. In any other ordinary situation, the army is considered routing, which means that it must resolve all but one single damage token. This means that unless you've forfeited playing some other (if there were any available) cards for that round, you're gonna have the hard choice of either going on to fight into the next round (and possibly play the "Regroup" combat card then), since you didn't order your forces to execute a tactical withdrawal, or decide to run away cowardly anyway, leading them to their deaths while flee the battlefield in a disorganized manner probably getting trampled by their own more then the pursuing enemy forces. The game also limits the potential targets of the retreat: you cannot retreat across a river, nor to a territory neighboring the enemy. This creates a rather interesting tactic of a way of "flanking" the enemy forces, ultimately preventing their retreat into that direction. In case there is no legal territory to retreat to possible, the winner of the combat then chooses where the losing army retreats to (i.e. next to a neighboring hostile force / across a ford) and places one additional damage token onto it in order to represent the extra losses they had endured due to their retreat being actually dictated by the charging victors. None of the retreat restrictions are valid as long as the target region includes friendlies, however, which are considering to be rushing to the help of their comrades and covering their fallback (i.e. helping them cross the river or positioning themselves to cover the withdrawal).

And here's the fun part: that may be just the tip of the iceberg. That is in no way the entirety of the combat system, which includes factors such as terrain superiority and tactical maneuvers (both players each round have got to play a card, no choice like in WoR) - e.g. the Warg Riders, whose maneuver is basically the same as causing a Rout, as it represents cavalry trampling down the foe (+ the ghastly wolves biting down the already-wounded and tearing them apart, with their howls making the demoralized poor Lake-Men of Esgaroth practically piss their pants from) and forcing the FPP army resolve all damage tokens, or bringing in the Giant Bats from Mirkwood to fly down onto the poor Free Peoples' combatants. There are many ways to add or remove damage tokens by way of playing various Cards and like I've already inclined, Leadership makes an overall much, much more important segment in battles. You really want to destroy your opponent's leadership in this game (there are cards that allow that) as it offers re-rolls for multiple purposes, allows for the playing of some mighty cards and grants fast(er) movement, not to mention that sometimes it can be used for defensive purposes to negate some inflicted damage.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

TLDR: BoFA tremendously expands WoR's combat system (I really, really love that incredible game, but after BoFA winning the Battle at the Fords of Isen seemed just so...hollow in comparison) that it cannot be underlined, also proportionally broadening the thematic odor. Despite the fact that we're talking about a few clashes next to some hill or on the banks of a river between maybe not even a hundred soldiers, the effect is just as epic as the Battle of The Pelennor Fields. I may have not played through a big number of similar games, but I have never seen such a blend of cards (maneuvers and special tactics), rounds, retreat rules, unit variation, terrain factors and dice, along with the (I think?) original damage system.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.