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Subject: Wie sagt man 'bicycle kick' auf deutsch? rss

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Deb Wentworth
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Liebe Spielfreunde -

How do you say 'bicycle kick' in German? (like Klaus Fischer 1982 World Cup). I haven't been able to find it in a quick look at the internet.

Vielen dank!
Deb
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Fallrückzieher
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Deb Wentworth
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Thank you! The 'Fallrück' part makes sense to me - but I wouldn't have guessed 'Zieher'.

(Sorry to post a non-game related question.)
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Leon
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Next time try leo.org or dict.cc

Very good dictionaries
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Florian Woo
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debwentworth wrote:
Thank you! The 'Fallrück' part makes sense to me - but I wouldn't have guessed 'Zieher'.

(Sorry to post a non-game related question.)

You separated it wrongly: it is "Fall" and "Rückzieher". Which means doing something which is drawing backwards ("zurück ziehen" or "nach hinten ziehen") while falling.
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Peter W.
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Just learned, that Fallrückzieher is "bicycle kick" in english!
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Deb Wentworth
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Wolle_Petterson wrote:
debwentworth wrote:
Thank you! The 'Fallrück' part makes sense to me - but I wouldn't have guessed 'Zieher'.

(Sorry to post a non-game related question.)

You separated it wrongly: it is "Fall" and "Rückzieher". Which means doing something which is drawing backwards ("zurück ziehen" or "nach hinten ziehen") while falling.


Just seeing this - thanks, that makes more sense.
 
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Deb Wentworth
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papadjango wrote:
Just learned, that Fallrückzieher is "bicycle kick" in english!


And I just learned what a 'scorpion kick' is. Very impressive thing to watch....
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Tim Tix
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debwentworth wrote:
Wolle_Petterson wrote:
You separated it wrongly: it is "Fall" and "Rückzieher". Which means doing something which is drawing backwards ("zurück ziehen" or "nach hinten ziehen") while falling.


Just seeing this - thanks, that makes more sense.


Now the funny part is that - when it's done sideways - it's called a "Seitfallzieher". What does that tell us a) about its semantics and b) what is it called in English? "Horizontal bicycle kick"?
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Florian Woo
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TimTix wrote:
debwentworth wrote:
Wolle_Petterson wrote:
You separated it wrongly: it is "Fall" and "Rückzieher". Which means doing something which is drawing backwards ("zurück ziehen" or "nach hinten ziehen") while falling.


Just seeing this - thanks, that makes more sense.


Now the funny part is that - when it's done sideways - it's called a "Seitfallzieher". What does that tell us a) about its semantics and b) what is it called in English? "Horizontal bicycle kick"?
I never thought about "Seitfallzieher" but the semantics don't seem to make sense. Fallrückzieher has "(zu)rückziehen" in its word, at least the online dictionaries say so. While Seitfallzieher has "zur Seite fallen" in its word. But then there is "zieher" left, which is not really a word on its own.

They should have called it "Fallseitzieher" oder "Seitfallrückzieher".
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Tim Tix
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Wolle_Petterson wrote:
I never thought about "Seitfallzieher" but the semantics don't seem to make sense. Fallrückzieher has "(zu)rückziehen" in its word, at least the online dictionaries say so. While Seitfallzieher has "zur Seite fallen" in its word. But then there is "zieher" left, which is not really a word on its own.

They should have called it "Fallseitzieher" oder "Seitfallrückzieher".


Hm, it's a while since I studied linguistics and I was never really good at it.

But why shouldn't "Zieher" be a word on its own? It's a noun derrived from "ziehen" and would describe the person doing it or the act itself.

Also, "Seitfallzieher" seems fine to me. Its structure would be Seit-fallzieher - with a "Fallzieher" decribing the act and the movement.

However, these aren't words that people use very often - so that any conventional use could be established. I guess these terms were rather coined by sports journalists - who didn't care too much.

Also I don't think, one could argue that any of those terms is more "right" than others.

Fallseitzieher would have worked along Fallrückzieher, and Rückfallzieher along Seitfallzieher, I guess.
 
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Christian Gienger
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But Rückfall is a word in its own rights and people associate something different then. Maybe something to "zieh Rückfälle"
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Deb Wentworth
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My activities with soccer are limited to managing my fantasy team and cheering/yelling at the tv. I don't know a term for Zeitfallzieher in English. I asked a couple of friends who actually play soccer, and they don't know of one either. I guess we just say side kick.

Interesting discussion! I love those long German compound nouns.
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Seba J
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debwentworth wrote:
Zeitfallzieher in English


time-case-puller?

scnr
 
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Florian Woo
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debwentworth wrote:
Zeitfallzieher
You need a DeLorean for that

Speaking of compound nouns: if you actually score using a bicycle kick, it is a "Fallrückziehertor". Our language is great
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Deb Wentworth
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Your language is great indeed! I have a photo of a shop with a sign "Fussbodenschleifmaschinenverleih" on my Facebook page and the caption "this is why Germans don't play Scrabble".

By the way, a soccer-playing friend just told me that we call it "scissors kick". That's very descriptive, I think.

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Tim Tix
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debwentworth wrote:
Your language is great indeed! I have a photo of a shop with a sign "Fussbodenschleifmaschinenverleih" on my Facebook page and the caption "this is why Germans don't play Scrabble".


While I don't like playing scrabble at all (because I want to create the coolest words and not four-letter-words with triple score), I guess German is a great language to play Scrabble. With all those grammatical features you can score a ton by adding just one letter to a word several times, e.g.:

lauf - run (noun or imperative form)
laufe - run (inflected form)
laufen - run
laufend - running (also: ongoing)
laufende - running (inflected form)
laufender - running (inflected form), also: running person


debwentworth wrote:
By the way, a soccer-playing friend just told me that we call it "scissors kick". That's very descriptive, I think.


It is. Much more so than bicycle kick I'd say. If you execute a Rückfallzieher as if you were pedalling, that'll be ridiculous...
 
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Alain Baum
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debwentworth wrote:
Your language is great indeed! I have a photo of a shop with a sign "Fussbodenschleifmaschinenverleih" on my Facebook page and the caption "this is why Germans don't play Scrabble".

Actually, Scrabble in German works pretty well (like Tim mentioned).

However, Word on the Street is broken in German unless you add some house rules (e.g. no more than 5 syllables).
 
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Tim Tix
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I'd love to try Paperback, but word games really need a language-specific edition.

Y for example is much more common in English than in German - so it's odd that there are a couple of them (as cards or tiles) and you only score a few points for them - while the opposite is true for K.
 
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Deb Wentworth
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I had Paperback for a while but traded it. I got tired of people playing a group of letters and saying 'is this a word?'.

I actually have a German version of Scrabble, jokes aside. I find it really hard to play, though - too difficult to switch the brain over to the 2nd, less fluent language. Likewise, I made it through only one game of Words with Friends in German.

At least your language is more phonetic. Try pronouncing these quickly:

Tough
Though
Trough
Through
Thorough
Thought

Then again, at least we only have one word for THE rather than six.
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Christian Gienger
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debwentworth wrote:

Then again, at least we only have one word for THE rather than six.


It's three, not six
 
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Deb Wentworth
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Des, dem, den...

Can you imagine how hard it is for us English speakers? Let's say I want to say 'the skunk' in German. I have to do a mental lookup in my 2x3x4 memorized table (singular vs pleural, gender, case) to find the correct word For THE.

And if that wasn't bad enough, if there is an adjective after THE (e.g. The angry skunk) I have to do a mental lookup in another 2x3x4 table to pick the right ending for the adjective.

How do you do it?!
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Christian Gienger
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debwentworth wrote:
Des, dem, den...

Can you imagine how hard it is for us English speakers? Let's say I want to say 'the skunk' in German. I have to do a mental lookup in my 2x3x4 memorized table (singular vs pleural, gender, case) to find the correct word For THE.

And if that wasn't bad enough, if there is an adjective after THE (e.g. The angry skunk) I have to do a mental lookup in another 2x3x4 table to pick the right ending for the adjective.

How do you do it?!


That's just declination. Still the same word.

How we do it? Growing up with that shit. I mean I don't mind the gendering at all (except when translating rules...), but the inconsistency with the natural gender of something and the genus of the word is pretty annoying. On top is the girl which uses it, but the boy uses he.

And I learned Latin in school which has some more cases. But when wie say Stinktier, everyone knows that it's nothing cute like you might think with the name skunk even if you never heard anything about it.

Edit:
Oh, and if you want to annoy your German teacher, write an article about yogurt, using Der Joghurt, die Joghurt and das Joghurt all over the text and explain that all three versions are allowed (though you should be consistent in a single text).
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Marius Stein
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debwentworth wrote:
Des, dem, den...

Can you imagine how hard it is for us English speakers? Let's say I want to say 'the skunk' in German. I have to do a mental lookup in my 2x3x4 memorized table (singular vs pleural, gender, case) to find the correct word For THE.

And if that wasn't bad enough, if there is an adjective after THE (e.g. The angry skunk) I have to do a mental lookup in another 2x3x4 table to pick the right ending for the adjective.

How do you do it?!


Well said. But have you ever had a look at an "grammar table" for Hungarian?! 2x3x4 is a joke compared to it... :-D

And they (the Hungarians) do it like this: We just take the suffix that sounds best...
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Tim Tix
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Locu wrote:
That's just declination. Still the same word.


Oh, inflected forms can be counted as words, too, depending on definition, of course. In fact, there - to my knowledge - no widely accepted definition of what a word is. Not to talk about the comparison of different languages.

I'd struggle to give the answer myself, but you can argue about the number of "words" in the following sentence:

"Wenn hinter Fliegen Fliegen fliegen, fliegen Fliegen Fliegen hinterher."

Is it 9? Is it 6? 5? 4?
 
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