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Subject: Waterproof Gaming Material? rss

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Derek H
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I'm looking for ideas from the community for a gaming material that can be used instead of wood or cardboard for playing games outdoors (especially on the beach). I'd like to make home-brew versions of some games that are adaptable to this format e.g. tile-laying games.

The ideal material would be:
* easy to cut/carve
* easy to paint on or mark
* not too light (small pieces could blow away)
* not too expensive
* available in different thicknesses

Any ideas?! (apart from the "water proof your wooden pieces" option)

 
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jesus vasquez
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You ever think of white 1x1 tiles and then you could paint them and seal them in. That way you could play whereever, they would be weatherproof, and look really nice. It doesn't take much to work with tile as lon as you have the right tools. Tile doesn't really meet all of yor needs but to me is a easy solution. Tile can be purchased at a relatively cheap price.
 
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FullContactGEEK
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Sculpy or Fimo clay can be used to make a large variety of bits.
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robin h.
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a few ideas, neither of which meets all of your requirements, but which might be a jumping off point:

Printable Magnet sheets would work, but the surface to stick them too might be too awkward to bring.

"craft foam sheets" are available in stickers also, are waterproof, and cheap enough, but lightweight.

Fimo and Sculpey clay are bakeable plastic clay, and can be molded to pretty much any shape/color you need. I've used them to replace random lost bits to games. You could roll them to thickness and cut. Moderately expensive, but can be purchased for a buck or so per package on sale (or cheaper in multi-color packs), you might get 6-8 Carcassonne size/thickness tiles per package. Durable, and can be further shaped after baking with power tools or by sanding. You can make multicolor tiles, or carve/texture them before baking too. This would be my first choice for a game I knew I would use frequently.

"Linoleum" tiles

ceramic tiles (available in rectangles, hexes, etc) Heavy.

If you want rectangles, consider "repurposing" Rummykub or Dominoes, or if you have access to appropriate tools, cut them in half to make squares.

Hmmm. I've never tried this, but I know that Formica laminate is available in sheet form to make custom countertops. It might be possible to get offcuts from a fabricator. Pergo flooring is similar.

I found some fantastic stuff at a recycling store near me, it was plastic used to make outdoor signs, so signmaking shops might have offcuts. I've had good luck getting matboard offcuts from framing shops for (indoor) tile games.

Good luck.




 
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Olivier Lamontagne
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In 1$ stores, there are waterproof puzzles for kids. Using a permanent marker on the back can make a board.
 
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Born To Lose, Live To Win
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I'm just finishing up making King of the Tabletop on 1" wood tiles. I painted them with exterior grade paint I had left over from house projects and am going to print the counters onto weatherproof mailing labels (they come two to a page, so there is little reformatting in order to miss the lines). I made counter trays from wood and polyurethaned them. The only thing I haven't redone is the player charts where you actually place your lands, standing army and fortifications. I am kicking ideas around for it though.

My intent wasn't to play outside, but to make the game last longer when used by the wing-eating, pepsi-spilling, chain-smoking neanderthals I game with. Though, I think they (the counters) would stand up well to the elements in any case (probably better than standing up to the clods abuse).

I wouldn't give up on wood, using exterior paints or polyurethane would make them virtually indestructible to moisture. Wood is relatively easy to work with and relatively cheap. It also gets cheaper as you scale up. If you plan to make a few games waterproof, the extra materials left over from the first game are easily reused.

(I know you said apart from waterproofing wood pieces, but I wanted to give my 2 cents anyway, it is a viable solution!)
 
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J. Green
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lsamadi wrote:
Sculpy or Fimo clay can be used to make a large variety of bits.


This is a good idea that meets all your requirements. After you bake the clay it's hard, and would be a great material for making for instance a hive set or travel settlers.
 
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Derek H
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the_juice101 wrote:
You ever think of white 1x1 tiles and then you could paint them and seal them in. That way you could play whereever, they would be weatherproof, and look really nice. It doesn't take much to work with tile as lon as you have the right tools. Tile doesn't really meet all of yor needs but to me is a easy solution. Tile can be purchased at a relatively cheap price.

jesus
I am not sure what you mean by "1x1" tiles? What material are these made from and what are they usually used for? Do you mean like bathroom tiles made from ceramic?
 
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Derek H
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robinh wrote:
a few ideas, neither of which meets all of your requirements, but which might be a jumping off point:

Robyn - thanks for these ideas.

Quote:
Printable Magnet sheets would work, but the surface to stick them too might be too awkward to bring.

I have not seen any of this available locally? I guess I would need to import it.

Quote:
"craft foam sheets" are available in stickers also, are waterproof, and cheap enough, but lightweight.

They are lightweight, but as you say fairly cheap. Maybe if I found some way to weigh down the underside...

Quote:
Fimo and Sculpey clay are bakeable plastic clay, and can be molded to pretty much any shape/color you need. ... This would be my first choice for a game I knew I would use frequently.

Fimo and Sculpey clay are *expensive* in my local hobby store (all imports, unfortunately) but maybe for smaller pieces these would work.

Quote:
"Linoleum" tiles

Good idea - I have seen this mentioned elsewhere to be used for boards.

Quote:
ceramic tiles (available in rectangles, hexes, etc) Heavy.

I just came across hexagonal tiles (about 1.5") across the other day. I must find out costs and see if they come in larger sizes (make a great outdoor Settlers game!)

Quote:
If you want rectangles, consider "repurposing" Rummykub or Dominoes, or if you have access to appropriate tools, cut them in half to make squares.

Might also be expensive....

Quote:
Hmmm. I've never tried this, but I know that Formica laminate is available in sheet form to make custom countertops. It might be possible to get offcuts from a fabricator.

We have Formica laminate from a current DIY project! I think this would make a good substitute for cards as its quite thin and fairly non-bendable in small sizes. I just need to figure out how to cut it properly.

Quote:
I found some fantastic stuff at a recycling store near me, it was plastic used to make outdoor signs, so signmaking shops might have offcuts. I've had good luck getting matboard offcuts from framing shops for (indoor) tile games.

I need to find out if we have such a store anywhere...
 
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Derek H
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TheChin! wrote:
I wouldn't give up on wood, using exterior paints or polyurethane would make them virtually indestructible to moisture. Wood is relatively easy to work with and relatively cheap. It also gets cheaper as you scale up. If you plan to make a few games waterproof, the extra materials left over from the first game are easily reused.

(I know you said apart from waterproofing wood pieces, but I wanted to give my 2 cents anyway, it is a viable solution!)

Joe
Good points; np, I won't give up on wood - although its harder to work with at smaller sizes (for me at least, as I do not have "high resolution" tools). Any suggestions as to the best wood to use - supawood and plywood are both cheap and easy to cut but are very vulnerable to moisture; what alternatives are there?
 
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Born To Lose, Live To Win
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Quote:
Joe
Good points; np, I won't give up on wood - although its harder to work with at smaller sizes (for me at least, as I do not have "high resolution" tools). Any suggestions as to the best wood to use - supawood and plywood are both cheap and easy to cut but are very vulnerable to moisture; what alternatives are there?


Yeah cutting one inch squares on a table saw was fun! Me and a buddy cut plywood into 1 inch strips and then attempted to cut the strips (6 at a time) into squares. Those squares came flying out of the tablesaw at VERY high speedssurprise. We had to build a little jig that would hold all the squares/strips down so they wouldn't move on each pass, otherwise we were afraid of busting out lights in his workshop. It worked out pretty well in the end and we got about 350 usable squares from the 1/4" piece I got for about $5.

Conversely, depending on what you want there are some decent deals on the internet to buy precut pieces.

http://www.craftparts.com/mall/Geometrics3.asp
http://www.caseyswood.com/shoppingcart/zen-cart/index.php?ma...
Ebay has some also.


The problem, as I see it, is that buying external grade paint (to properly ensure moisture protection) is only economical in large scale applications. The smallest you can usually buy it is 1 quart cans. I was lucky, I had a nice range of 1 quart cans from some painting we did in my daughters room (you, know trees, flowers birds and stuff). Yes it was interior paint, but my thought was, if you can wash on the walls without harm than it it will protect the wood.

Polyurethane works pretty good too, pretty d@mn good in fact. I had a bunch left over from redoing my floors and it's only downside is that softer or thirstier woods soak it up and you need multiple coats. But, if you take a tile paint your piece art (or apply a label or whatever) and then polyurethane it, it should be well protected.

On another persons recommendation, I haven't worked with ceramic tiles, other than redoing bathroom floors, but I wonder what kind of paint you might need for that kind of application? But those small octagon tiles I've seen at Lowes (a U.S. Home Improvement store) might be cool for some games. I can't ever remember seeing hexes though. If you find any, drop me a link. That would be cool

 
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