Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
9 Posts

Myth» Forums » General

Subject: Slaughterfield rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
David Griffin
United States
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
I did act 2 of No Rest for the Weary. I didn't play the special "you're really tired" rules because as a new player I was having enough trouble with the basic rules without those.

I'm not sure it's my favorite mode of Myth. It's kind of like a video game (Galaga maybe) with waves and waves of monsters. It seems more a grind than a fun tactical challenge. I used the Razorfiend for the mini boss. It took me 3 nights of playing to do just this act. I'd REALLY rather do tiles. But I think it was a good experience to try once.

It was definitely different! I just don't think it should be in story quests. I suspect the folks that like Slaughterfield are looking for a different kind of game. Or am I wrong?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Judy Krauss
United States
Pittsburgh
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
but I'm not the only one
badge
My hands are small, I know, but they're not yours, they are my own
mbmbmbmbmb
carbon_dragon wrote:
I did act 2 of No Rest for the Weary. I didn't play the special "you're really tired" rules because as a new player I was having enough trouble with the basic rules without those.

I'm not sure it's my favorite mode of Myth. It's kind of like a video game (Galaga maybe) with waves and waves of monsters. It seems more a grind than a fun tactical challenge. I used the Razorfiend for the mini boss. It took me 3 nights of playing to do just this act. I'd REALLY rather do tiles. But I think it was a good experience to try once.

It was definitely different! I just don't think it should be in story quests. I suspect the folks that like Slaughterfield are looking for a different kind of game. Or am I wrong?


Aren't you playing with the 2.0 rules and cards? Slaughterfield was removed from all quests (although it is still in the rules as an alternate mode of playing the game, and IMHO, it is useful when just learning how to play Myth and also for getting used to new heroes and monsters).
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Thorsten Schröder
Germany
Bonn
flag msg tools
Loser at the 'Pursuit of Happiness Contest'
mbmbmbmbmb
'No rest for the weary' is a 1.0 Storyquest though. I don't have it in front of me but I think the OP is refering to the 2nd Act that has some rounds of slaughterfield.

This storyquest is not ideal for a first experience with Myth. The tired effect can really get to your nerves (although for experienced players it's a good challenge)... good thing you left it out.

Just play a bit more... slaughterfield does not appear on a regular basis. Less so in 2.0.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Griffin
United States
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
First off, thanks for responding.

Ok, I can see that I have a misunderstanding. Let me explain what I did. I have the 2.0 rules, but there were no story quests in the manual (though there were additional story quests in a accompanying book which I thought were more advanced ones).

There WERE story quests in the 1.0 manual though. Also I went on BGG (here) and found a rewrite of the story quests that I thought were the 2.0 versions of them. Apparently they were just a very nice player written rewrite (which it's great to have) but which still had slaughterfield in there.

So I'm glad they're taking them out of the main game. I think they're cool for a different mode of play but it's not a mode I like much. I also have the "new" I think card for the story quest but it's just a card and there's no real information to speak of in there.

It's only recently I realized that the chapter quests and the act quests are obsolete, but I didn't know the story quests were obsolete too (at least in the form I have them).

So what ARE the quests you're supposed to play at this point? Are there starter story quests you can play to teach the game? That is what I was trying to use this quest for, to learn game play. I had to ignore the special rules in some cases in order not to get slaughtered on the first tile (tough game to learn solo).

So what do you recommend for "intro" play and/or quests?

EDIT: One P.S. is that trying to "come up to speed" on a game can be tough in ANY game. It took me months to get reasonably competent in Star Trek Attack Wing which is, on the surface a much less complex game. So I mean no criticism here. I'm coming to the game late, so there's a lot I don't know about this one yet, but it seems like a great game, if I can figure it out.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
zee ogre
msg tools
mbmb
carbon_dragon wrote:
First off, thanks for responding.

Ok, I can see that I have a misunderstanding. Let me explain what I did. I have the 2.0 rules, but there were no story quests in the manual (though there were additional story quests in a accompanying book which I thought were more advanced ones).


With 2.0, the original story quests have evolved into Modules, which is why the 2.0 book doesn't have those quests anymore. However, if you want to dive into Journeyman content right away, you're probably going to want to have a few deck manipulations and at least one title so that you can take advantage of the Journeyman cards right away. Myth 1.X Story quests are the probably the best way to get those before the 3rd wave shipping of Modules arrives sometime in 2017, if you don't want to grind Bosses.

It's my belief that 1.X content is totally forward compatible to 2.0, but there will be some ambiguities that you have to houserule. The number and contentiousness of those ambiguities are the among the reasons we have a Myth 2.0 in the first place.

I've said in the past that I feel like the 1.X rules were more like a public beta, but since I like the game so much, I feel like I should be more charitable. Let's instead say that the 2.0 rules are MCG responding quickly to the demands of their player base, making changes to try to improve the experience for new players. At the same time 2.0 provides more for experienced players that want more guided/directed content, and they've also added more clear rules and advancement for players that prefer the free-form "Adventure" model.


carbon_dragon wrote:
So what do you recommend for "intro" play and/or quests?

EDIT: One P.S. is that trying to "come up to speed" on a game can be tough in ANY game. It took me months to get reasonably competent in Star Trek Attack Wing which is, on the surface a much less complex game. So I mean no criticism here. I'm coming to the game late, so there's a lot I don't know about this one yet, but it seems like a great game, if I can figure it out.


To introduce new people to the game, I stack the quest and Darkness deck and run some basic tiles, I've done this a few times.

Stacking the quest deck: "The Just-OK Hunt" goes on top of the quest deck, and what is under it depends on what I know about the people playing. If they're mercenary types, the quest where you have to get poisoned for the apothecary comes second; if they're more classic good-guys "Rescue my Daughter" is good to get people invested. Both the second quest possibles overlap safely with Just-OK hunt and allow me to introduce the idea of doing multiple quests at once.

Stacking the darkness deck: I make sure that the first Darkness deck run-through won't introduce captains to the table until the 3rd Darkness cycle. I try to assemble the Darkness deck to build some tension on the first two short tiles; usually by the end of the second tile I've gone through all 10 cards and had to reshuffle.

The first tile I place is the 6x6 campfire. Do a little patter about sitting around the fire shooting the breeze, read the text of the Just-OK hunt, then place the hunting pack as the group gets "ambushed". Kill some bugs, meeting the potion merchant is nice for a quick spend of gold, and it ensures that antidote is available, even if the Brigand or Acolyte are not.

Second tile is a 4x6 or 4x12, depending on how well they did with the first pack of bugs. The second tile introduces traps, I explain that usually we'd roll for a trap, but for the introduction I'm going to run the floor spikes trap as it's probably the least fiddly. More hunting packs keep the quest moving.

Third tile is a 12x12 and we draw our second quest, lairs are introduced. Usually just place one lair, but if everyone's really into it I'll place 2 lairs and/or make one of the hunting packs a captain. By the end of the third tile, Just-OK hunt should be done as well as whatever quest we got on the 12x12; a good place to wrap-up.

After those introductory tiles, we've usually spent about 2 hours learning the game, and people know if they want to play more. If they do want more, I'll start them on No Rest for the Weary, it's kind of a dark story but the challenge is fun and the Harbinger title is a really nice starter.

It seems like you're past introductions, though I hope that helps.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Thorsten Schröder
Germany
Bonn
flag msg tools
Loser at the 'Pursuit of Happiness Contest'
mbmbmbmbmb
The only real way to start completely in 2.0 is adventuring.
In my opinion that's the biggest draw back at the moment though it can be mitigated by playing the 1.0 Story Quests.

There are 2 official PDF-Modules as free DLC. But the first (Fury of the Fireborn) I don't want to play right now because it is being reworked in Journeyman.
The Second (Rise of the Revenants) states that you shoul play it when your Characters have at least 2 deckmanipulations and 1 title (or something like that).
Sadly that's not possible to get right now with the official 2.0 content.

There's a quest chain that leads to a bossfight that grants you a title.

I hope they are going to get the 1.0 Story reworked to modules soon cause this question comes up a lot.
Also for new buyers, buying the Box with 2.0 rulebook, reading about modules and then there are no available... not great.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Griffin
United States
Georgia
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
It seems to me that Slaughterfield mode is more like something the creators invented to showcase their skill at managing the mechanisms of fighting under pressure of a never ending series of enemies. In other words, practice, but it seems to warp the Myth mechanism of not ALWAYS attacking in order to manage the threat. In this mode, you still have to manage threat but it seems hard to sit out a round because the enemies build up and up.

Not my favorite mode though.

I don't have the skill to do it by a long shot, but I like the way it looks when it's played right by the creators, almost a poetry in motion (or occasionally a poetry in delay)

For me, I'm still not managing threat well with my Acolyte (too high) or my soldier (too low) so I'm never able to use your mother is a crawler effectively.

Which is another problem really. If I look at a quest or a story or an adventure/module, I'm never really sure not only how hard the quest is, but how much skill you need as a player -- how much experience before you can handle the threat effectively. If ever there was a game that needs videos on how to play hero X effectively (beyond a few lines on a card) this game is it.

As I said, I used the Razorfiend as a mini-boss and it went OK I think. I had husbanded my cards for high attacks and when he appeared both my heroes hit him with everything they had. He got one attack which would have killed one of my heroes. It seemed like he got 4 D10s (or 5 I can't remember) but it seemed like according to the card it would have done 15 points or something would would have been a one hit kill, but I had an interrupt that negated a single attack. That was chance more than planning. Maybe I played it wrong but even though I killed it, I could have lost a character in one round which seems excessive. So either I played him wrong, or he was a bit too much for the group I had.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.