$20.00
Recommend
8 
 Thumb up
 Hide
7 Posts

Pocket Imperium» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Pocket Imperium: A four-sided game review rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Chris Marling
United Kingdom
Cambridge
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
For more of my reviews visit:

Four-sided reviews subscription thread

Review originally posted here:

http://goplaylisten.com/games/pocket-imperium-a-four-sided-g...

---

Pocket Imperium* is a sci-fi-themed abstract area control game using programmed, simultaneous action selection to plan and carry out your moves. It’s a microgame that attempts to pack the idea of a 4X game (expand, explore, exterminate, exploit) into a tiny package – and does so with aplomb. It was originally released on Brett Gilbert’s fantastic Good Little Games website and if you want to try it out it’s still downloadable there in its basic form – but the boxed copy adds plenty to the original.

Pocket Imperium plays in under an hour and says two-to-four players on the box; but I’d say anyone looking specifically for a two-player game should look elsewhere (more on that later). In the small box are seven cardboard tiles and 50 tokens; 50 wooden ships, and 14 linen finish cards. You can find it for about £20, which is solid value for what’s in the box – all the components are of a high standard and are well designed.



Teaching

Pocket Imperium is, on one level, a very straightforward game – but it can take people a few rounds to get to grips with some of the specifics. During the game players will vie for control of ‘systems’ (which I’ll call planets) and ‘sectors’ (which I’ll call hexes); by each round placing new ships (expanding), moving them (exploring) and attacking with them (exterminating). At the end of the round they will score points (exploit); and they do this for six or eight rounds, depending on player count. Each player has 12 ships (destroyed ships return to your stock and can be used again) and three cards that represent the three available actions. The ships and actions are identical for each player – hence the game’s abstract nature, despite the theme. At the start of each round all players simultaneously decide in which order they’ll do their three actions, placing the cards face down in front of them.

The order matters in terms of tactics (you may bolster your forces before moving or attacking; or perhaps you’re at full strength, so want to attack first to have ships to reintroduce later in the round); but also in terms of how powerful the actions will be. Once all players have chosen their action order, everyone turns over their first card at once. If you’re the only player to choose an action in a position, you do it three times – but just twice if two of you pick it, and only once if three pick it in the same slot. This adds a nice bluff and reading element to the game, as sometimes it may be obvious what particular opponents should do while you may have less obvious options. Once each player has completed their first card you reveal your second cards and complete those; and then the last cards are completed (all actions are optional, in full or in part).

The ‘exploit’ part of the round sees each player choose a different one of the hexes to score (this is compulsory). Players score points for any planets they control on that hex – but other players will also score ones they control on the same hex. This means you often have to give points to other players, making your decision a little trickier than it could be. Then whoever controls the largest planet chooses a second (unscored) hex to score. Finally, at the end of each round every space can only sustain a certain amount of ships: any extras on a space are lost, which stops you building lots of ships on a single space.

The four sides

These are me, plus three fictitious players drawn from observing my friends and their respective quirks and play styles.

The writer:
I was a fan of the original print and play version of Pocket Imperium, but this is a definite improvement in all departments. The great old three-player original is largely intact and plays the same way, but moving from cards to hexes allows for different layouts; while some different planet setups on the reverse of the hexes also add to the replayability possibilities.
The thinker: This is an impressive abstract strategy game in a small package, with even the random element that some may be wary of having a tactical element. It’s important to emphasise how important initial placement can be. You get to place two ships on each of two planets before play begins and depending on how the hexes are randomly laid, there can be some real advantages to be had. But as in all area control games its up to the players to real back in the leaders and not let someone grab a clear lead; which can be a great leveller versus more skilled players.
The trasher: While I like a good area control game, I’m on the fence about this one. While you do get a good ebb and flow as powers rise and fall, the euro-style components make it a bit of a personality vacuum. On the flip of that I like the simplicity of the combat, with ships simply neutralising/obliterating each other in a fight. But I’d have loved to have seen some individual player powers, or scenarios, rather than just the different map set ups that – while looking like they add variety – don’t do anything to change the core elements of the game.
The dabbler: This isn’t my kind of game at all, but it’s not as bad as some and is quite short! One plus point is the fact the points you score are kept face-down. This gives an opportunity for the talkers in your group to persuade the others of how their plight is doomed – even if they may actually be right in contention. It’s also nice that the ships of different colours are also different shapes; but there is no attempt within the rules to give the game any added personality. This may be a ‘pocket’ parody of big brother Twilight Imperium, but don’t expect to get into character.



Key observations

Player count is a definite issue here. While Pocket Imperium is great with three I’ve found it very zero-sum with two and I wish they hadn’t put that number on the box at all. The game is fine with four, but strangely they’ve added two rounds – presumably so that each player goes first twice. The problem is it makes the game drag on too long for what it is, while six rounds feels about right with three. We’ve started playing just four rounds in a four-player game and for us this works just fine: there’s enough ebb and flow in this shorter variant of the game to make you feel you’ve got your money’s worth.

I also have a small issue with some of the choices in wording – a common bugbear with rulebooks. Using phrases such as ‘sector’ and ‘system’ just confuses people – and what’s the point when so little else has been done to add theme elsewhere? All it does is serve to make explaining the game a little more difficult. Replayability is a common issue that comes up in reviews and comments from others, but taken as a quick filler you play occasionally this won’t be an issue – although I can see why people see it as more than a filler if trying to play the full-length four-player game. But no, this is not a game you should be picking up if you want to play it every week! But then how many games really are?

Conclusion

Pocket Imperium is an impressive microgame. But despite the artwork and pasted on theme, this is very much an abstract game in a small package. If you like abstract games that have a random element, as well as area control, it is definitely worth taking a long look at. Games tend to be very close and once you’re familiar with the rules it should only take about 30 minutes for three players – and both setup and pack-down are quick and easy. There are even a couple of small expansions available. I would never play it with two players (I'd suggest taking a look at The Rose King) and would only play our shortened version with four. But it's great to have another really good microgame on the market (you might also want to check out - self-promotion alert - Empire Engine). Overall then, an impressive achievement.

* I would like to thank designer David J Mortimer for providing a copy for review.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David desJardins
United States
Burlingame
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
hairyarsenal wrote:
Player count is a definite issue here. While Pocket Imperium is great with three I’ve found it very zero-sum with two and I wish they hadn’t put that number on the box at all.


Aren't all two-player games zero-sum? Anything you do that hurts your opponent is just as good as helping yourself. You don't really explain WHY you don't like it as a two-player game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Marling
United Kingdom
Cambridge
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
DaviddesJ wrote:
hairyarsenal wrote:
Player count is a definite issue here. While Pocket Imperium is great with three I’ve found it very zero-sum with two and I wish they hadn’t put that number on the box at all.


Aren't all two-player games zero-sum? Anything you do that hurts your opponent is just as good as helping yourself. You don't really explain WHY you don't like it as a two-player game.


I think a look at the nature of the available actions will make it clear. Games tend to peter out very quickly as each action one player takes is countered by the other.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David desJardins
United States
Burlingame
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
hairyarsenal wrote:
I think a look at the nature of the available actions will make it clear. Games tend to peter out very quickly as each action one player takes is countered by the other.


That's certainly clearer.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David J. Mortimer
United Kingdom
Melksham
Wiltshire
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for taking the time to review thoroughly Chris.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrzej Kaczor
Poland
Chorzów
INTL
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I agree with the fact that game is too long.

6 rounds in three player game and 4 rounds in 4 players game sounds very fair I am not sure how many turns we should take in 2 player games
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Deep Fish
msg tools
Thanks for the well-written review which expressed your summised thoughts so clearly. In particular the use of the "ficticious writers" such as:

Quote:
While I like a good area control game, I’m on the fence about this one. While you do get a good ebb and flow as powers rise and fall, the euro-style components make it a bit of a personality vacuum.


On combat. I am interested in a mini-4x which is solid on all the 4X's.

It is interesting to see if they can continue with expansions to add layers such as diplomacy and tactical combat options and so forth at the same time as keeping time down and play up!!

I think I will purchase this one based off your review:-

Quote:
Pocket Imperium is an impressive microgame. But despite the artwork and pasted on theme, this is very much an abstract game in a small package. If you like abstract games that have a random element, as well as area control, it is definitely worth taking a long look at.


2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.