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Viper .
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I know it would be expensive but if the components (and gameplay) were top notch, I bet if would sell really well!!
 
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Jacob Schoberg
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Viper5121 wrote:
it would be expensive


This is the answer.
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James Lautermilch
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Boy you think Scythe is expensive! Yipes
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Kevin C.
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I think you are underestimating the cost to do something like this right.

"3D" terrain can be a lot of different things with all different pricepoints. I remember Mordheim had cheap cardboard and plastic things you would put together to make the city included in the box, with other terrain available.

It was OK, but not great for the price. (It is GW, so it was more expensive than it needed to be.)

So, I think including terrain in the box that will be pleasing to enough people at the chosen pricepoint is a difficult thing.

Plus, I think the publishers know there is a ton of aftermarket 3D terrain available for people that want this sort of thing. I think it is easier for them to set a price for just the game and then people can do what they want.

People are complaining about games reaching the $100 plateau now. Really good terrain with minis in meaningful quantities would push it beyond this I think.

I don't think something like this would sell very well. Either you cut corners on the terrain or some other component to get it to a reasonable pricepoint and then, why include the terrain at all?

Kevin
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Jeffery Hudson
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Mage Knight had a 3-d dungeon set and it didn't go over well. It's pretty to look at but the cost was high....about as high as the cost for their really cool castle. I still have both in my collection and someday they may see use again...but it would be expensive for very little change in gameplay.

And as other's have said, there are already tons of after market products that have this niche covered.
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Jerry Martin
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Heroscape had 3D terrain. It wasn't a dungeon crawl, but it was close. It did have a number of sets, but overall I think the only reason was because Hasbro was backing it and it never really got huge until after it went out of print.
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Freelance Police
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Good question. I know back in ye olden days, we didn't have dungeon terrain, but stuff like treasure chests and doors are becoming more common, at least as KS miniatures. Miniature wargames, like Mage Knight and HeroScape had castles, though no dungeons.

ObPlug: Secret Weapon Miniatures is finishing their dungeon and mines game tile KS. $75 for 89 pieces!
 
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Michael Russell
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You could buy Dwarven Forge tiles and use them instead of the cardboard dungeon tiles that come with games. I've done this for Heroquest.
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James Arias
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Yeah near as I can tell it's that it would be too expensive. I'm macguyvering a lego-and-cardstock solution for walls and multi-level buildings.

Kickstarter has some cool projects that are chipboard-based terrain, and several companies have papercraft and chipboard solutions. Most of these are for skirmish gaming and RPG's.

And...there's always foamboard and laser printed cardstock to practice your crafting skills!
 
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Stephen Williams
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Viper5121 wrote:
I know it would be expensive but if the components (and gameplay) were top notch, I bet if would sell really well!!


If the components are truly going to be "top notch," as you suggest, then the "expensive" angle cannot be overstated as a limiting factor in sales. It seems to me that most of the "big meaty dungeon crawlers" out there right now are selling for around $100 - and that's just for the 2D version base game. Expansions extra.

IIRC, the 3D version of Settlers of Catan originally went for $300 when it first came out. Were you imagining a game bigger or smaller than Catan by way of components? If the board pieces (and bits?) are all going to be 3D, I would expect that to quickly rise up to $1000, or more.

I can only speak for myself here, but I'm NOT dropping $1000 on a single game (especially not something prone to expansionism like a dungeon crawler.) I don't care how awesome it looks or how fantastic the rules are, that's just too much money on one game, for me. I expect there would be others who feel the same, so "selling well" very quickly becomes a relative term. I'm sure that there ARE some people who would buy it, but it's not going to move enough copies to justify retail distribution nationwide. More likely it would be a KS-only project; printing off only enough copies to meet backer demand, and even that only assuming it could make its funding goal.

Speaking of KS-only, you know how some mini-heavy games are YEARS late due to manufacturing delays, etc, etc? Imagine a game where EVERY TILE, possibly every TOKEN is effectively another mini to be produced. Even if it does fund, you can probably expect it to take the better part of a decade to be delivered.

Other problems I could foresee:
- storage: This thing would take up a TON of space.

- assembly time: Assuming walls detach from floors to provide a modicum of storage relief, it would take FOREVER to set things up. I mean, traditional DCs are known to take time setting up, so multiply that by ten for setting up an entire 3D dungeon.

- issues seeing board state: As pretty as may look in pictures, a 3D board does have some drawbacks. Namely, it becomes difficult to assess the state of the game when a player's view of trinkets on the ground is obscured by walls as such. A few plastic minis is one thing, but a full 3D dungeon would block a lot. You'd spend that much more time leaning around to make sure you've seen everything before taking a turn.

As has been mentioned, there are plenty of aftermarket solutions for making your own 3D terrain. And those projects will only get easier to do as 3D printers become more and more commonplace. People who want 3D terrain can have it - why should publishers exclude potential sales to those who don't care as much?
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Neil Edmonds
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They do this already - it's called video games. laugh
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Marc Nelson Jr.
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Watch DM Scotty and make your own.
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Stuart
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It would all just look like a dolls house for monsters.
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Trent DePonte
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jamesl59 wrote:
Boy you think Scythe is expensive! Yipes


I was under the impression is was already being sold in bargain bins.
 
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James Arias
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[q="pawnvsdice"]It would all just look like a dolls house for monsters.[/q

LOL.

"Are you playing with that dollhouse again?"
"It's not a dollhouse, it's a DUNGEON!"
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fambans `
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Full size 3D terrain is impractical for actual play. Reaching over the walls to move your character slows down play.
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Ryan Buerger
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As an example, I use dwarven forge for zombicide black plague and the larger scenarios easily require $500+ of dwarven forge. Can you imagine paying that for just one game? At least this way I can reuse the dwarven forge for several different games.
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I would say a 3D dungeon would work better as a deluxe expansion, there would be no point in owning an expensive gorgeous looking game that nobody wants to play.
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A. B. West
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I could see one with a cardboard punch out 3D dungeon. A clever designer could make that part of the mechanics in the game too - i.e. levels, stairs, pits, etc.
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quinn ortmeyer
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as others have said, cost is the limiting factor, and to have such a cost sunk into one game is not a financially viable model. however there is quite a bit of terrain available to do your own set ups.
check out this kickstarter that is in the final days, and for what you get is quite reasonable and looks perty too.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1084069684/tablescapes-...


this set is flexible enough to use in a variety of settings ( fantasy rpg, brimstone, decscent etc...)

 
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Drake Coker
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I disagree with the cost objection, at least in one aspect. If the sales volume were high enough, then the cost could be made reasonable by using injected plastic (like Heroscape did). But, you would need Hasbro-like sales to make it work.

To get that kind of sales volume, you would need a pretty simple game as it would need to sell through Target and similar outlets.
 
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Ray
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This makes me think that it would be cool if a company made a full 3D dungeon set and then other game companies made games that would use it.
 
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Stephen Williams
Canada
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Olvenskol wrote:
I disagree with the cost objection, at least in one aspect. If the sales volume were high enough, then the cost could be made reasonable by using injected plastic (like Heroscape did). But, you would need Hasbro-like sales to make it work.

To get that kind of sales volume, you would need a pretty simple game as it would need to sell through Target and similar outlets.


This is sort of like saying "World Peace is totally possible, if enough people around the world would just forgive past transgressions and start trusting one another."

Yes, IF you could achieve your preposition, THEN the outcome is feasible. The problem is actually achieving that preposition in the first place.

A board game that carries a retail price somewhere between $500 and $1000 is not going to sell enough copies to achieve the kind of volume it would need to make this theory work in practice. People don't go to Target to buy solid gold wristwatches, after all, and merely convincing upper management at Target to put the game on shelves does not guarantee they will be sold.
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Ryan Buerger
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fambans wrote:
Full size 3D terrain is impractical for actual play. Reaching over the walls to move your character slows down play.


Honestly never seen much of an impact, though I am sure there is a slight one. On the opposite end of the spectrum walls and doors as well as their state are much easier to see in 3D so I have had people say zombicide was easier without using the cardboard tiles as the walls were all very obvious.
 
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